Read by QxMD icon Read

Stroke inflammation

Yuji Kaneko, Colleen Pappas, Naoki Tajiri, Cesar V Borlongan
Oxytocin protects against ischemia-induced inflammation and oxidative stress, and is associated with GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid, an inhibitory neurotransmitter) signaling transduction in neurons. However, the molecular mechanism by which oxytocin affords neuroprotection, especially the interaction between oxytocin receptor and GABAA receptor (GABAAR), remains to be elucidated. Primary rat neural cells were exposed to oxytocin before induction of experimental acute stroke model via oxygen-glucose deprivation-reperfusion (OGD/R) injury...
October 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
Vanessa Di Cataldo, Alain Géloën, Jean-Baptiste Langlois, Fabien Chauveau, Benoît Thézé, Violaine Hubert, Marlène Wiart, Erica N Chirico, Jennifer Rieusset, Hubert Vidal, Vincent Pialoux, Emmanuelle Canet-Soulas
Aim: Advanced atherosclerosis increases inflammation and stroke risk in the cerebral vasculature. Exercise is known to improve cardio-metabolic profiles when associated with a caloric restriction, but it remains debated whether it is still beneficial without the dietary control. The aim of this study was to determine both the peripheral and central effects of exercise training combined with a cholesterol-rich diet given ad libitum in old ApoE(-/-) mice. Methods: Forty-five-weeks old obese ApoE(-/-) mice fed with a high cholesterol diet ad libitum were divided into Exercise-trained (EX; running wheel free access) and Sedentary (SED) groups...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Xianxiu Wan, Jian-Jun Wen, Sue-Jie Koo, Lisa Yi Liang, Nisha Jain Garg
Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is presented by increased oxidative/inflammatory stress and decreased mitochondrial bioenergetics. SIRT1 senses the redox changes and integrates mitochondrial metabolism and inflammation; and SIRT1 deficiency may be a major determinant in CCM. To test this, C57BL/6 mice were infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc), treated with SIRT1 agonists (resveratrol or SRT1720), and monitored during chronic phase (~150 days post-infection). Resveratrol treatment was partially beneficial in controlling the pathologic processes in Chagas disease...
October 2016: PLoS Pathogens
Neila Maria R de Lima, Emerson de O Ferreira, Mara Yone S D Fernandes, Francisco Arnaldo V de Lima, Kelly Rose T Neves, Marta Regina S do Carmo, Geanne M de Andrade
Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of ischemic brain damage. Astrocyte activation promotes the production of several proinflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α and iNOS. Eventually, neuronal death occurs, leading to the development of motor and memory deficits in patients. Boldine is the main alkaloid in the leaves and bark of the Peumus boldus Molina, and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. The aim of this work was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of boldine on neuroinflammation and memory deficits induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in mice...
October 19, 2016: Behavioural Pharmacology
Andrew J Beamish, Torsten Olbers, Aaron S Kelly, Thomas H Inge
Obesity is a major global health problem, and its multisystem effects are inextricably linked with elevated cardiovascular risk and adverse outcomes. The cardiovascular benefits of reversing obesity in adults are well-established. Compared with other weight-loss strategies, programmes that incorporate bariatric surgery for weight loss are beneficial for sustained BMI reduction. A marked improvement in cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia, inflammation, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, has been observed after bariatric surgery...
October 20, 2016: Nature Reviews. Cardiology
Ernesto Schiffrin
For many years we have studied models of hypertension in which endothelin-1 (ET-1) is overexpressed. These include DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, Dahl-salt sensitive rats, and stroke prone SHR, in all of which ET-1-mediated mechanisms play a role in blood pressure elevation and vascular injury. In humans we demonstrated overexpression of ET-1 in the endothelium of small arteries from stage 2 hypertensive patients. We have also produced a mouse that overexpresses human ET-1 in the endothelium using a Tie-2 promoter, which exhibited increased oxidative stress and inflammation, hypertrophic remodeling and endothelial dysfunction of small arteries but only slight blood pressure elevation...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Masatsugu Horiuchi
Hypertensive patients have greater chances of such cardiovascular events as stroke, coronary heart disease, heart or renal failure, peripheral artery disease, and dementia. It is also well recognized that diabetes increases the cardiovascular risks in concert with hypertension. Therefore, main goals for an innovation of anti-hypertensive therapy would be to achieve further risk reduction by targeting the functional, metabolic, and structural alterations associated with hypertension. Professors Dzau and Braunwald et al proposed the concept of "the cardiovascular disease continuum" in 1991, and that hypertension may trigger the chain of events, leading to end-stage heart disease; however, this concept was quite new at that time, and there was some discussion whether "the cardiovascular disease continuum" is true or not...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
M Asunción Barreda-Manso, Natalia Yanguas-Casás, Manuel Nieto-Sampedro, Lorenzo Romero-Ramírez
Following a central nervous system (CNS) injury, restoration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity is essential for recovering homeostasis. When this process is delayed or impeded, blood substances and cells enter the CNS parenchyma, initiating an additional inflammatory process that extends the initial injury and causes so-called secondary neuronal loss. Astrocytes and profibrotic mesenchymal cells react to the injury and migrate to the lesion site, creating a new glia limitans that restores the BBB. This process is beneficial for the resolution of the inflammation, neuronal survival and the initiation of the healing process...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
Yuandong Li, Woo June Choi, Wan Qin, Utku Baran, Lauren M Habenicht, Ruikang K Wang
BACKGROUND: Arteriogenesis describes the active growth of the pre-existing collateral arterioles, which is a crucial tissue-saving process in occlusive vascular diseases. NEW METHOD: We propose to use optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based microangiography (OMAG) to monitor arteriogenesis following artery transection in mouse ear and focal stroke in mouse brain. RESULTS: Our longitudinal mouse ear study shows that the growth phase of arteriogenesis, indicated by changes in collateral vessel diameter and velocity, occurs between 12-24hours after vessel occlusion...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Methods
Bo Liu, Fei Li, Jingshan Shi, Danli Yang, Yuanyuan Deng, Qihai Gong
Gastrodin (GAS), which is extracted from the Chinese herbal medicine Gastrodia elata Blume, has long been used to improve stroke, epilepsy, dizziness and dementia. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of GAS on subacute phase cerebral ischemia‑reperfusion (I/R) injury remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of GAS on cerebral I/R injury in rats. The rats were pretreated with GAS by gavage for 7 days followed by I/R surgery, and were then treated with GAS for 7 days after I/R surgery...
September 26, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Domenico Maurizio Toraldo, Michele De Benedetto, Luana Conte, Francesco De Nuccio
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive interruptions of breathing, causing a Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia (CIH) that can be a key step in the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Nowadays, in fact, there is scientific evidence showing the close relationship between OSA and atherosclerosis, even in those patients who do not show co-morbidities such as hypertension, diabetes, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), cigarette smoking and obesity, which normally are able to activate the endothelium...
October 7, 2016: Current Vascular Pharmacology
Jian-Jun Wen, Xianxiu Wan, John Thacker, Nisha Jain Garg
BACKGROUND: Chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCM) caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc) infection is prevalent in Latin America and recognized as an emerging infectious heart disease in the US. The NO-cGMP-PKG1α pathway maintains cardiac homeostasis and inotropy and may be disturbed due to phosphodiesterase (PDE5) mediated cGMP catabolism in CCM. METHODS AND RESULTS: C57BL/6 mice were infected with Tc, and at the end of acute parasitemia (i.e. 45 days post-infection), treated with sildenafil (SIL, 1 mg/kg) twice per week for 3 weeks...
June 2016: JACC. Basic to Translational Science
Mandip S Dhamoon, Ying-Kuen Cheung, Yeseon P Moon, Clinton B Wright, Joshua Z Willey, Ralph Sacco, Mitchell Sv Elkind
BACKGROUND: high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with cardiovascular events and mortality, but the association of CRP with functional status is not well defined. We hypothesised that serum levels of high-sensitivity CRP are associated with long-term trajectories of functional status independently of vascular risk factors and stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) occurring during follow-up. DESIGN: prospective, population-based. SETTING: northern Manhattan Study...
October 15, 2016: Age and Ageing
Maju Mathew Koola, John D Sorkin, Molly Fargotstein, W Virgil Brown, Bruce Cuthbert, Jeffrey Hollis, Jeffrey K Raines, Erica J Duncan
BACKGROUND: Peripheral arterial compliance (PAC) is a measure of the ability of the vascular tree to dilate in response to a pressure wave. Reduced PAC is seen in patients with psychiatric diagnoses and has been associated with increased risk for stroke, myocardial infarction, and mortality. The objective of this pilot study was to identify predictors of reduced PAC in subjects with psychiatric diagnoses. METHODS: Male psychiatric subjects (N = 77) were studied in a cross-sectional study of medication effects on PAC conducted from August 2005 to February 2010...
2016: Primary Care Companion to CNS Disorders
Sarah Hoffmann, Hendrik Harms, Lena Ulm, Darius G Nabavi, Bruno-Marcel Mackert, Ingo Schmehl, Gerhard J Jungehulsing, Joan Montaner, Alejandro Bustamante, Marcella Hermans, Frank Hamilton, Jos Göhler, Uwe Malzahn, Carolin Malsch, Peter U Heuschmann, Christian Meisel, Andreas Meisel
Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein)...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Josef Anrather, Costantino Iadecola
The immune response to acute cerebral ischemia is a major factor in stroke pathobiology and outcome. While the immune response starts locally in occluded and hypoperfused vessels and the ischemic brain parenchyma, inflammatory mediators generated in situ propagate through the organism as a whole. This "spillover" leads to a systemic inflammatory response first, followed by immunosuppression aimed at dampening the potentially harmful proinflammatory milieu. In this overview we will outline the inflammatory cascade from its starting point in the vasculature of the ischemic brain to the systemic immune response elicited by brain ischemia...
October 11, 2016: Neurotherapeutics: the Journal of the American Society for Experimental NeuroTherapeutics
Paul Owusu Donkor, Ying Chen, Liqin Ding, Feng Qiu
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ligusticum species (Umbelliferae) have been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine, Korean folk medicine and Native American medicine for their medicinal and nutritional value. Decoctions of the rhizomes are used in treatment and prophylaxis of migraine, anaemia and cardiovascular conditions including stroke. AIM OF STUDY: This review is intended to fully compile the constituents of locally and traditionally used Ligusticum species, present their bioactivities and highlight potential leads for future drug design, and thus, provide a reference for further research and application of these species...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Filip K Swirski, Matthias Nahrendorf, Peter Libby
Inflammation furnishes a series of pathogenic pathways that couple the risk factors for atherosclerosis with altered behavior of the intrinsic cells of the arterial wall, endothelium, and smooth muscle and promote the disease and its complications. Myeloid cells participate critically in all phases of atherosclerosis from initiation through progression, and ultimately the thrombotic consequences of this disease. Foam cells, lipid-laden macrophages, constitute the hallmark of atheromata. Much of the recent expansion in knowledge of the roles of myeloid cells in atherosclerosis revolves around the functional contributions of subsets of monocytes, precursors of macrophages, the most abundant myeloid cells in the atheroma...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Amy Geard, Gift D Pule, David Chelo, Valentina Josiane Ngo Bitoungui, Ambroise Wonkam
Sickle cell disease (SCD) vastly impacts the African continent and is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Stroke, kidney disease, and pulmonary hypertension are considered as proxies of severity in SCD with several genomic loci implicated in their heritability. The present expert review examined the current data on epidemiology and genetic risk factors of stroke, pulmonary hypertension, and kidney disease associated with SCD, as indexed in PubMed(®) and Google Scholar(®). Studies collectively show that stroke and kidney disease each affect ∼10% of SCD patients, with pulmonary hypertension displaying a higher prevalence of 30% among adults with SCD...
October 2016: Omics: a Journal of Integrative Biology
Farah Z Dawood, Suzanne Judd, Virginia J Howard, Nita A Limdi, James F Meschia, Mary Cushman, George Howard, David M Herrington, Elsayed Z Soliman
The relation between inflammation and prothrombotic state in atrial fibrillation (AF) is well recognized. This suggests a potential role for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, in improving prediction of stroke in participants with AF. Cox proportional hazard analysis was used to examine the risk of stroke in 25,841 participants (40% black and 55% women) with and without AF who were enrolled in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke study from 2003 to 2007...
September 14, 2016: American Journal of Cardiology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"