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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905926/understanding-clinical-and-non-clinical-decisions-under-uncertainty-a-scenario-based-survey
#1
Vlad V Simianu, Margaret A Grounds, Susan L Joslyn, Jared E LeClerc, Anne P Ehlers, Nidhi Agrawal, Rafael Alfonso-Cristancho, Abraham D Flaxman, David R Flum
BACKGROUND: Prospect theory suggests that when faced with an uncertain outcome, people display loss aversion by preferring to risk a greater loss rather than incurring certain, lesser cost. Providing probability information improves decision making towards the economically optimal choice in these situations. Clinicians frequently make decisions when the outcome is uncertain, and loss aversion may influence choices. This study explores the extent to which prospect theory, loss aversion, and probability information in a non-clinical domain explains clinical decision making under uncertainty...
December 1, 2016: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27905471/evidence-of-genotypic-adaptation-to-the-exposure-to-volcanic-risk-at-the-dopamine-receptor-drd4-locus
#2
Charlotte Faurie, Clement Mettling, Mohamed Ali Bchir, Danang Sri Hadmoko, Carine Heitz, Evi Dwi Lestari, Michel Raymond, Marc Willinger
Humans have colonized and adapted to extremely diverse environments, and the genetic basis of some such adaptations, for example to high altitude, is understood. In some cases, local or regional variation in selection pressure could also cause behavioural adaptations. Numerous genes influence behaviour, such as alleles at the dopamine receptor locus D4 (DRD4), which are associated with attitude toward risk in experimental settings. We demonstrate genetic differentiation for this gene, but not for five unlinked microsatellite loci, between high- and low risk environments around Mount Merapi, an active volcano in Java, Indonesia...
December 1, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903935/impairment-of-decision-making-in-multiple-sclerosis-a-neuroeconomic-approach
#3
Maria Sepúlveda, Begoña Fernández-Diez, Elena H Martínez-Lapiscina, Sara Llufriu, Nuria Sola-Valls, Irati Zubizarreta, Yolanda Blanco, Albert Saiz, Dino Levy, Paul Glimcher, Pablo Villoslada
OBJECTIVE: To assess the decision-making impairment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and how they relate to other cognitive domains. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis in 84 patients with MS, and 21 matched healthy controls using four tasks taken from behavioral economics: (1) risk preferences, (2) choice consistency, (3) delay of gratification, and (4) rate of learning. All tasks were conducted using real-world reward outcomes (food or money) in different real-life conditions...
November 30, 2016: Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical and Laboratory Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898667/does-group-size-matter-for-behavior-in-online-trust-dilemmas
#4
Sabrina Artinger, Nir Vulkan
How does group size influence behavior in online trust dilemmas? We investigate cooperation in groups of 4 to 100 players. While overall levels of cooperation are stable across group sizes, we find significant gender differences: women increase cooperation with group size and cooperate significantly more than men in large groups. These results are robust when controlling for risk aversion, age, and other individual differences. They highlight the importance of studying behavior and gender differences in large groups...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893263/-incidental-fear-cues-increase-monetary-loss-aversion-correction-to-schulreich-gerhardt-and-heekeren-2016
#5
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "Incidental fear cues increase monetary loss aversion" by Stefan Schulreich, Holger Gerhardt and Hauke R. Heekeren (Emotion, 2016[Apr], Vol 16[3], 402-412). In the current article, there was an error in the Study 2 portion of the article. The fourth paragraph of the Results section should read as follows: Performing the same analyses as in Study 1, we found an effect of incidental fear cues on decision behavior. Participants accepted fewer gambles in the fearful-face condition (32.77%) than in the neutral-face condition (33...
December 2016: Emotion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885240/incidence-and-characteristics-of-needlestick-injuries-among-medical-trainees-at-a-community-teaching-hospital-a-cross-sectional-study
#6
Ben Ouyang, Lucy Dx Li, Joanne Mount, Alainna J Jamal, Lauren Berry, Carmine Simone, Marcus Law, R W Melissa Tai
ObjectivesThis field study aimed to determine the incidence and distribution of needlestick injuries among medical trainees at a community teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada.MethodsThe study was performed during the 2013-2015 academic years at Toronto East General Hospital (TEGH), a University of Toronto-affiliated community-teaching hospital during the 2013-2015 academic years. Eight-hundred and forty trainees, including medical students, residents, and post-graduate fellows, were identified and invited via email to participate in an anonymous online fluidsurveys...
November 22, 2016: Journal of Occupational Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885080/importance-of-engaging-in-dialogue-with-the-population-after-a-nuclear-accident
#7
Hans Vanmarcke
Human behaviour is primarily driven by perceptions and this is particularly important in the aftermath of a nuclear accident. One of the main lessons we can draw from the Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents is that once the acute phase of the accident is over, it is important to engage in dialogue with the affected population. Science-based government measures, imposed from above, give rise to much opposition. Examples of this are the aversion of having to live in a contaminated territory, the reluctance of consumers to buy even slightly contaminated food and the opposition of most evacuees to return to their old homes...
November 24, 2016: Radiation Protection Dosimetry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884798/neural-markers-of-loss-aversion-in-resting-state-brain-activity
#8
Nicola Canessa, Chiara Crespi, Gabriel Baud-Bovy, Alessandra Dodich, Andrea Falini, Giulia Antonellis, Stefano F Cappa
Neural responses in striatal, limbic and somatosensory brain regions track individual differences in loss aversion, i.e. the higher sensitivity to potential losses compared with equivalent gains in decision-making under risk. The engagement of structures involved in the processing of aversive stimuli and experiences raises a further question, i.e. whether the tendency to avoid losses rather than acquire gains represents a transient fearful overreaction elicited by choice-related information, or rather a stable component of one's own preference function, reflecting a specific pattern of neural activity...
November 21, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27879412/modeling-individual-patient-preferences-for-colorectal-cancer-screening-based-on-their-tolerance-for-complications-risk
#9
Glen B Taksler, Adam T Perzynski, Michael W Kattan
INTRODUCTION: Recommendations for colorectal cancer screening encourage patients to choose among various screening methods based on individual preferences for benefits, risks, screening frequency, and discomfort. We devised a model to illustrate how individuals with varying tolerance for screening complications risk might decide on their preferred screening strategy. METHODS: We developed a discrete-time Markov mathematical model that allowed hypothetical individuals to maximize expected lifetime utility by selecting screening method, start age, stop age, and frequency...
November 22, 2016: Medical Decision Making: An International Journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27873541/the-relationship-between-suppression-and-subsequent-intrusions-the-mediating-role-of-peritraumatic-dissociation-and-anxiety
#10
Cornelia Măirean, Ciprian Marius Ceobanu
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Although previous studies showed that thought and emotion suppression represent risk factors for intrusions development, the mechanisms that explain these relations were less explored. This study aims to examine the relationships between thought and emotion suppression and the symptoms of intrusion following the exposure to a trauma-related event. Moreover, we explored if these relationships would be mediated by peritraumatic state dissociation and state anxiety...
November 22, 2016: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869198/sub-optimality-in-motor-planning-is-retained-throughout-9-days-practice-of-2250-trials
#11
Keiji Ota, Masahiro Shinya, Kazutoshi Kudo
Optimality in motor planning, as well as accuracy in motor execution, is required to maximize expected gain under risk. In this study, we tested whether humans are able to update their motor planning. Participants performed a coincident timing task with an asymmetric gain function, in which optimal response timing to gain the highest total score depends on response variability. Their behaviours were then compared using a Bayesian optimal decision model. After 9 days of practicing 2250 trials, the total score increased, and temporal variance decreased...
November 21, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862121/designing-graphs-to-communicate-risks-understanding-how-the-choice-of-graphical-format-influences-decision-making
#12
Eric R Stone, Wändi Bruine de Bruin, Abigail M Wilkins, Emily M Boker, Jacqueline MacDonald Gibson
Previous research suggests that the choice of graphical format for communicating risk information affects both understanding of the risk magnitude and the likelihood of acting to decrease risk. However, the mechanisms through which these effects work are poorly understood. To explore these mechanisms using a real-world scenario, we examined the relative impact of two graphical displays for depicting the risk of exposure to unexploded ammunition during potential land redevelopment. One display depicted only the foreground information graphically (a bar graph of the number of people harmed), and a second depicted the foreground and background graphically (a stacked bar graph representing both the number harmed and at risk)...
November 10, 2016: Risk Analysis: An Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843399/on-the-use-of-bayesian-decision-theory-for-issuing-natural-hazard-warnings
#13
T Economou, D B Stephenson, J C Rougier, R A Neal, K R Mylne
Warnings for natural hazards improve societal resilience and are a good example of decision-making under uncertainty. A warning system is only useful if well defined and thus understood by stakeholders. However, most operational warning systems are heuristic: not formally or transparently defined. Bayesian decision theory provides a framework for issuing warnings under uncertainty but has not been fully exploited. Here, a decision theoretic framework is proposed for hazard warnings. The framework allows any number of warning levels and future states of nature, and a mathematical model for constructing the necessary loss functions for both generic and specific end-users is described...
October 2016: Proceedings. Mathematical, Physical, and Engineering Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27829041/cognitive-bias-in-ambiguity-judgements-using-computational-models-to-dissect-the-effects-of-mild-mood-manipulation-in-humans
#14
Kiyohito Iigaya, Aurelie Jolivald, Wittawat Jitkrittum, Iain D Gilchrist, Peter Dayan, Elizabeth Paul, Michael Mendl
Positive and negative moods can be treated as prior expectations over future delivery of rewards and punishments. This provides an inferential foundation for the cognitive (judgement) bias task, now widely-used for assessing affective states in non-human animals. In the task, information about affect is extracted from the optimistic or pessimistic manner in which participants resolve ambiguities in sensory input. Here, we report a novel variant of the task aimed at dissecting the effects of affect manipulations on perceptual and value computations for decision-making under ambiguity in humans...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826731/self-generated-motives-for-not-gambling-among-young-adult-non-gamblers
#15
Christina L Rash, Daniel S McGrath
Motivational models have been shown to usefully describe reasons for engaging in addictive behaviors including gambling disorder. Although most scales designed to measure motives have been derived statistically, self-generated open-ended responses have also shown utility for identifying unique motives for gambling. While the motivational structure for gambling disorder has been extensively explored, there has been a paucity of research examining motives for choosing not to gamble. This is not the case for other addictive behaviors such as alcohol use where motives for abstaining from drinking have been well defined...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Gambling Studies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818610/peer-passenger-norms-and-pressure-experimental-effects-on-simulated-driving-among-teenage-males
#16
C Raymond Bingham, Bruce G Simons-Morton, Anuj K Pradhan, Kaigang Li, Farideh Almani, Emily B Falk, Jean T Shope, Lisa Buckley, Marie Claude Ouimet, Paul S Albert
OBJECTIVE: Serious crashes are more likely when teenage drivers have teenage passengers. One likely source of this increased risk is social influences on driving performance. This driving simulator study experimentally tested the effects of peer influence (i.e., risk-accepting compared to risk-averse peer norms reinforced by pressure) on the driving risk behavior (i.e., risky driving behavior and inattention to hazards) of male teenagers. It was hypothesized that peer presence would result in greater driving risk behavior (i...
August 2016: Transportation Research. Part F, Traffic Psychology and Behaviour
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27816038/evaluations-of-alcohol-consequences-moderate-social-anxiety-risk-for-problematic-drinking
#17
Danit Nitka, Roisin M O'Connor
The link between social anxiety (SA) and problematic drinking is complex; this seems predominantly true among young adults. Individuals high on SA are thought to be particularly sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, which should deter them from drinking. Yet, some evidence suggests that those high on SA continue to drink despite experiencing negative alcohol-related consequences (NACs) (Morris, Stewart, & Ham, 2005). Although traditionally, researchers assume NACs are perceived as averse, emerging evidence suggests these are not categorically viewed as negative by undergraduates...
October 19, 2016: Addictive Behaviors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27809908/cognitive-biases-associated-with-medical-decisions-a-systematic-review
#18
Gustavo Saposnik, Donald Redelmeier, Christian C Ruff, Philippe N Tobler
BACKGROUND: Cognitive biases and personality traits (aversion to risk or ambiguity) may lead to diagnostic inaccuracies and medical errors resulting in mismanagement or inadequate utilization of resources. We conducted a systematic review with four objectives: 1) to identify the most common cognitive biases, 2) to evaluate the influence of cognitive biases on diagnostic accuracy or management errors, 3) to determine their impact on patient outcomes, and 4) to identify literature gaps...
November 3, 2016: BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27794690/neural-substrates-of-overgeneralized-conditioned-fear-in-ptsd
#19
Antonia N Kaczkurkin, Philip C Burton, Shai M Chazin, Adrienne B Manbeck, Tori Espensen-Sturges, Samuel E Cooper, Scott R Sponheim, Shmuel Lissek
OBJECTIVE: Heightened generalization of fear from an aversively reinforced conditioned stimulus (CS+, a conditioned danger cue) to resembling stimuli is widely accepted as a pathogenic marker of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Indeed, a distress response to benign stimuli that "resemble" aspects of the trauma is a central feature of the disorder. To date, the link between overgeneralization of conditioned fear and PTSD derives largely from clinical observations, with limited empirical work on the subject...
October 31, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792902/health-shocks-and-risk-aversion
#20
Simon Decker, Hendrik Schmitz
We empirically assess whether a health shock influences individual risk aversion. We use grip strength data to obtain an objective health shock indicator. In order to account for the non-random nature of our data regression-adjusted matching is employed. Risk preferences are traditionally assumed to be constant. However, we find that a health shock increases individual risk aversion. The finding is robust to a series of sensitivity analyses and persists for at least four years after the shock. Income changes do not seem to be the driving mechanism...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
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