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Risk aversion

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318343/enduring-consequences-from-the-war-on-drugs-how-policing-practices-impact-hiv-risk-among-people-who-inject-drugs-in-baltimore-city
#1
Natalie Flath, Karin Tobin, Kelly King, Alexandra Lee, Carl Latkin
BACKGROUND: Neighborhood-level characteristics, including police activity, are associated with HIV and Hepatitis C injection risk-behaviors among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, the pathways through which these neighborhood perceptions shape individual-level HIV risk behaviors are unclear. This study helps to explain perceived behaviors between perceived neighborhood police activity and HIV injection risk behavior (i.e., injection syringe/tool sharing in the previous 6 months)...
March 20, 2017: Substance Use & Misuse
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315885/advancement-in-texture-in-early-complementary-feeding-and-the-relevance-to-developmental-outcomes
#2
Jordan R Green, Meg Simione, Benjamin Le Révérend, Erin M Wilson, Brian Richburg, Marc Alder, Mirna Del Valle, Chrystel Loret
A child's transition to independent eating is a protracted process that progresses over the course of many years. Although major health agencies, such as the World Health Organization, now offer clear guidance when to begin introducing solids, advice about how to safely transition to progressively challenging foods is varied and comes from a staggering number of sources. The resulting conflicting views have promoted parental confusion and anxiety about what foods are appropriate and when to advance to new textures...
2017: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314059/deterrence-and-risk-preferences-in-sequential-attacker-defender-games-with-continuous-efforts
#3
Vineet M Payappalli, Jun Zhuang, Victor Richmond R Jose
Most attacker-defender games consider players as risk neutral, whereas in reality attackers and defenders may be risk seeking or risk averse. This article studies the impact of players' risk preferences on their equilibrium behavior and its effect on the notion of deterrence. In particular, we study the effects of risk preferences in a single-period, sequential game where a defender has a continuous range of investment levels that could be strategically chosen to potentially deter an attack. This article presents analytic results related to the effect of attacker and defender risk preferences on the optimal defense effort level and their impact on the deterrence level...
March 17, 2017: Risk Analysis: An Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28301828/steeper-discounting-of-delayed-rewards-in-schizophrenia-but-not-first-degree-relatives
#4
Linda Q Yu, Sangil Lee, Natalie Katchmar, Theodore D Satterthwaite, Joseph W Kable, Daniel H Wolf
Excessive discounting of future rewards has been related to a variety of risky behaviors and adverse clinical conditions. Prior work examining delay discounting in schizophrenia suggests an elevated discount rate. However, it remains uncertain whether this reflects the disease process itself or an underlying genetic vulnerability, whether it is selective for delay discounting or reflects pervasive changes in decision-making, and whether it is driven by specific clinical dimensions such as cognitive impairment...
March 7, 2017: Psychiatry Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298899/decision-making-in-multiple-sclerosis-the-role-of-aversion-to-ambiguity-for-therapeutic-inertia-among-neurologists-discutir-ms
#5
Gustavo Saposnik, Angel P Sempere, Daniel Prefasi, Daniel Selchen, Christian C Ruff, Jorge Maurino, Philippe N Tobler
OBJECTIVES: Limited information is available on physician-related factors influencing therapeutic inertia (TI) in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our aim was to evaluate whether physicians' risk preferences are associated with TI in MS care, by applying concepts from behavioral economics. DESIGN: In this cross-sectional study, participants answered questions regarding the management of 20 MS case scenarios, completed 3 surveys, and 4 experimental paradigms based on behavioral economics...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28296515/risk-preferences-and-attitudes-to-surgery-in-decision-making
#6
Andreas Meunier, Kinga Posadzy, Gustav Tinghög, Per Aspenberg
Background and purpose - There is increasing evidence that several commonly performed surgical procedures provide little advantage over nonoperative treatment, suggesting that doctors may sometimes be inappropriately optimistic about surgical benefit when suggesting treatment for individual patients. We investigated whether attitudes to risk influenced the choice of operative treatment and nonoperative treatment. Methods - 946 Swedish orthopedic surgeons were invited to participate in an online survey. A radiograph of a 4-fragment proximal humeral fracture was presented together with 5 different patient characteristics, and the surgeons could choose between 3 different operative treatments and 1 nonoperative treatment...
March 15, 2017: Acta Orthopaedica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28293672/student-characteristics-professional-preferences-and-admission-to-medical-school
#7
Iris Kesternich, Heiner Schumacher, Joachim Winter, Martin R Fischer, Matthias Holzer
Objectives: A potential new avenue to address the shortage of country doctors is to change the rules for admission to medical school. We therefore study the link between high-school grade point average and prospective physicians' choice to work in rural areas. To further inform the discussion about rules for admission, we also study the effects of other predictors: a measure of students' attitudes towards risk; whether they waited for their place of study (Wartesemester); whether their parents worked as medical doctors; and whether they have some practical experience in the medical sector...
2017: GMS Journal for Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290504/disease-dynamics-in-a-stochastic-network-game-a-little-empathy-goes-a-long-way-in-averting-outbreaks
#8
Ceyhun Eksin, Jeff S Shamma, Joshua S Weitz
Individuals change their behavior during an epidemic in response to whether they and/or those they interact with are healthy or sick. Healthy individuals may utilize protective measures to avoid contracting a disease. Sick individuals may utilize preemptive measures to avoid spreading a disease. Yet, in practice both protective and preemptive changes in behavior come with costs. This paper proposes a stochastic network disease game model that captures the self-interests of individuals during the spread of a susceptible-infected-susceptible disease...
March 14, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28289888/value-based-decision-making-battery-a-bayesian-adaptive-approach-to-assess-impulsive-and-risky-behavior
#9
Shakoor Pooseh, Nadine Bernhardt, Alvaro Guevara, Quentin J M Huys, Michael N Smolka
Using simple mathematical models of choice behavior, we present a Bayesian adaptive algorithm to assess measures of impulsive and risky decision making. Practically, these measures are characterized by discounting rates and are used to classify individuals or population groups, to distinguish unhealthy behavior, and to predict developmental courses. However, a constant demand for improved tools to assess these constructs remains unanswered. The algorithm is based on trial-by-trial observations. At each step, a choice is made between immediate (certain) and delayed (risky) options...
March 13, 2017: Behavior Research Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279877/a-model-based-analysis-of-decision-making-under-risk-in-obsessive-compulsive-and-hoarding-disorders
#10
Gabriel J Aranovich, Daniel R Cavagnaro, Mark A Pitt, Jay I Myung, Carol A Mathews
Attitudes towards risk are highly consequential in clinical disorders thought to be prone to "risky behavior", such as substance dependence, as well as those commonly associated with excessive risk aversion, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and hoarding disorder (HD). Moreover, it has recently been suggested that attitudes towards risk may serve as a behavioral biomarker for OCD. We investigated the risk preferences of participants with OCD and HD using a novel adaptive task and a quantitative model from behavioral economics that decomposes risk preferences into outcome sensitivity and probability sensitivity...
February 21, 2017: Journal of Psychiatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28276063/perceived-warmth-and-competence-of-others-shape-voluntary-deceptive-behaviour-in-a-morally-relevant-setting
#11
Ruben T Azevedo, Maria Serena Panasiti, Rosita Maglio, Salvatore Maria Aglioti
The temptation to deceive others compares to a moral dilemma: it involves a conflict between the temptation to obtain some benefit and the desire to conform to personal and social moral norms or avoid aversive social consequences. Thus, people might feel different levels of emotional and moral conflict depending on the target of the deception. Here we explored, in a morally relevant setting, how social judgements based on two fundamental dimensions of human social cognition - 'warmth' and 'competence' - impact on the decision to deceive others...
March 9, 2017: British Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264981/reason-s-enemy-is-not-emotion-engagement-of-cognitive-control-networks-explains-biases-in-gain-loss-framing
#12
Rosa Li, David V Smith, John A Clithero, Vinod Venkatraman, R McKell Carter, Scott A Huettel
In the classic gain/loss framing effect, describing a gamble as a potential gain or loss biases people to make risk-averse or risk-seeking decisions, respectively. The canonical explanation for this effect is that frames differentially modulate emotional processes - which in turn leads to irrational choice behavior. Here, we evaluate the source of framing biases by integrating functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 143 human participants performing a gain/loss framing task with meta-analytic data from over 8000 neuroimaging studies...
March 6, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221086/cassandra-s-regret-the-psychology-of-not-wanting-to-know
#13
Gerd Gigerenzer, Rocio Garcia-Retamero
Ignorance is generally pictured as an unwanted state of mind, and the act of willful ignorance may raise eyebrows. Yet people do not always want to know, demonstrating a lack of curiosity at odds with theories postulating a general need for certainty, ambiguity aversion, or the Bayesian principle of total evidence. We propose a regret theory of deliberate ignorance that covers both negative feelings that may arise from foreknowledge of negative events, such as death and divorce, and positive feelings of surprise and suspense that may arise from foreknowledge of positive events, such as knowing the sex of an unborn child...
March 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214730/risk-aversion-and-religious-behaviour-analysis-using-a-sample-of-danish-twins
#14
Jytte Seested Nielsen, Mickael Bech, Kaare Christensen, Astrid Kiil, Niels Christian Hvidt
Economics offers an analytical framework to consider human behaviour including religious behaviour. Within the realm of Expected Utility Theory, religious belief and activity could be interpreted as an insurance both for current life events and for afterlife rewards. Based on that framework, we would expect that risk averse individuals would demand a more generous protection plan which they may do by devoting more effort and resources into religious activities such as church attendance and prayer, which seems to be in accordance with previous empirical results...
February 12, 2017: Economics and Human Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214544/can-functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging-studies-help-with-the-optimization-of-health-messaging-for-lifestyle-behavior-change-a-systematic-review
#15
REVIEW
Maxine E Whelan, Paul S Morgan, Lauren B Sherar, Mark W Orme, Dale W Esliger
Unhealthy behaviors, including smoking, poor nutrition, excessive alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and sedentary lifestyles, are global risk factors for non-communicable diseases and premature death. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers a unique approach to optimize health messages by examining how the brain responds to information relating to health. Our aim was to systematically review fMRI studies that have investigated variations in brain activation in response to health messages relating to (i) smoking; (ii) alcohol consumption; (iii) physical activity; (iv) diet; and (v) sedentary behavior...
February 16, 2017: Preventive Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201943/risk-versus-benefit-or-risk-versus-risk-risk-aversion-in-the-medical-decision-making-process
#16
Elias Oussedik, Michael S Anderson, Steven R Feldman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Journal of Dermatological Treatment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28189037/how-the-twain-can-meet-prospect-theory-and-models-of-heuristics-in-risky-choice
#17
Thorsten Pachur, Renata S Suter, Ralph Hertwig
Two influential approaches to modeling choice between risky options are algebraic models (which focus on predicting the overt decisions) and models of heuristics (which are also concerned with capturing the underlying cognitive process). Because they rest on fundamentally different assumptions and algorithms, the two approaches are usually treated as antithetical, or even incommensurable. Drawing on cumulative prospect theory (CPT; Tversky & Kahneman, 1992) as the currently most influential instance of a descriptive algebraic model, we demonstrate how the two modeling traditions can be linked...
February 8, 2017: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182906/ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex-encodes-a-latent-estimate-of-cumulative-reward
#18
Keno Juechems, Jan Balaguer, Maria Ruz, Christopher Summerfield
Humans and other animals accumulate resources, or wealth, by making successive risky decisions. If and how risk attitudes vary with wealth remains an open question. Here humans accumulated reward by accepting or rejecting successive monetary gambles within arbitrarily defined temporal contexts. Risk preferences changed substantially toward risk aversion as reward accumulated within a context, and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) tracked the latent growth of cumulative economic outcomes...
February 8, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28180142/discounting-the-distant-future-data-on-australian-discount-rates-estimated-by-a-stochastic-interest-rate-model
#19
Chi Truong, Stefan Trück
Data on certainty equivalent discount factors and discount rates for stochastic interest rates in Australia are provided in this paper. The data has been used for the analysis of investments into climate adaptation projects in ׳It׳s not now or never: Implications of investment timing and risk aversion on climate adaptation to extreme events׳ (Truong and Trück, 2016) [3] and can be used for other cost-benefit analysis studies in Australia. The data is of particular interest for the discounting of projects that create monetary costs and benefits in the distant future...
April 2017: Data in Brief
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174549/activation-of-the-dlpfc-reveals-an-asymmetric-effect-in-risky-decision-making-evidence-from-a-tdcs-study
#20
Daqiang Huang, Shu Chen, Siqi Wang, Jinchuan Shi, Hang Ye, Jun Luo, Haoli Zheng
The phenomenon of loss aversion (the tendency for losses to have a greater impact than comparable gains) has long been observed in daily life. Neurocognitive studies and brain imaging studies have shed light on the correlation between the phenomenon of loss aversion and the brain region of the prefrontal cortex. Recent brain stimulation studies using bilateral transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have obtained various results showing the causal relationship between brain regions and decision making...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
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