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hemolytic anemia treatment

Valentina Talarico, Monica Aloe, Alice Monzani, Roberto Miniero, Gianni Bona
Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy defined by thrombocytopenia, non-immune microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure. HUS is typically classified into two primary types: 1) HUS due to infections, often associated with diarrhea (D+HUS, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia Coli-HUS), with the rare exception of HUS due to a severe disseminated infection caused by Streptococcus; 2) HUS related to complement, such HUS is also known as "atypical HUS" and is not diarrhea associated (D-HUS, aHUS); but recent studies have shown other forms of HUS, that can occur in the course of systemic diseases or physiopathological conditions such as pregnancy, after transplantation or after drug assumption...
December 2016: Minerva Pediatrica
Yu-Min Shen
Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defective complement regulation resulting in thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Patients can present as children or adults. The syndrome consists of hemolytic anemia with schistocytosis, thrombocytopenia, significant renal damage, and/or other organ system dysfunction(s). Patients with aHUS may succumb to the complications of the disease with the very first manifestation; surviving patients often suffer from progressive organ dysfunction with significant morbidity and mortality despite plasma infusion or plasma exchange...
2016: Thrombosis Journal
Daniel W Abbott, Kenneth D Friedman, Matthew S Karafin
BACKGROUND: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia that requires emergent treatment with plasma exchange and is one of the most important conditions for which apheresis service professionals are consulted. Careful interpretation of initial laboratory values and the peripheral blood smear is a critical first step to determining the need for plasma exchange because other conditions can show deceptively similar red cell morphology, and ADAMTS13 levels are often not rapidly available...
September 28, 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Ivanka S Nenova, Mariana Y Valcheva, Elina A Beleva, Dora Y Tumbeva, Marianna P Yaneva, Emilia L Rancheva, Zhanet G Grudeva-Popova
INTRODUCTION: Autoimmune disorders have been documented in solid tumors and malignant hematological disorders. They are very common and well studied in lymphomas which are associated with immune imbalance. They are less common in solid tumors and are categorized as paraneoplastic syndromes with unclear pathogenesis. AIM: The aim of the present study was to find the frequency of autoimmune phenomena in solid tumors of various origin, location and status of the tumor...
September 1, 2016: Folia Medica
Andre Paixao, Mehmet Cilingiroglu
Paravalvular leak (PVL) remains as uncommon but serious complication after surgical prosthetic valve implantation. PVL when associated which congestive heart failure, hemolytic anemia, or infective endocarditis may require percutaneous treatment. High-surgical risk is common in this population. Dedicated PVL devices are lacking often limiting optimal treatment.
October 2016: Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions
Kobina Dufu, Josh Lehrer-Graiwer, Eleanor Ramos, Donna Oksenberg
In sickle cell trait (SCT), hemoglobin A (HbA) and S (HbS) are co-expressed in each red blood cell (RBC). While homozygous expression of HbS (HbSS) leads to polymerization and sickling of RBCs resulting in sickle cell disease (SCD) characterized by hemolytic anemia, painful vaso-occlusive episodes and shortened life-span, SCT is considered a benign condition usually with minor or no complications related to sickling. However, physical activities that cause increased tissue oxygen demand, dehydration and/or metabolic acidosis leads to increased HbS polymerization and life-threatening complications including death...
September 28, 2016: Hematology Reports
Filiz Kizilirmak, Gultekin Gunhan Demir, Beytullah Cakal, Hüseyin Saffet Bekoz, Fatih Erkam Olgun
Evans syndrome (ES) is a rare hematological disease characterized by autoimmune hemolytic anemia, immune thrombocytopenia, and/or neutropenia, all of which may be seen simultaneously or subsequently. Thrombotic events in ES are uncommon. Furthermore, non-ST segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) during ES is a very rare condition. Here, we describe a case of a 69-year-old female patient presenting with NSTEMI and ES. Revascularization via percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was scheduled and performed...
September 2016: Indian Heart Journal
Daniel Croom, Heather Tracy
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) syndromes represent a spectrum of illnesses that share common clinical and pathologic features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ injury from pathologic small-vessel thrombosis. At least nine primary TMA syndromes have been described and classified based on common probable etiologies, diagnostic criteria, and treatments. The most recognized of the TMA syndromes include thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS)...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Shouichi Ohga
Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome...
2016: [Rinshō Ketsueki] the Japanese Journal of Clinical Hematology
Harriët M Loovers, Nienke Tamminga, André B Mulder, Rienk Y J Tamminga
Case reports on the effect of hydroxyurea (HU) therapy for unstable hemoglobins (Hbs) are sparse; only three adult cases have been reported. We report for the first time on the effect of HU therapy in children carrying unstable Hbs. The first case concerns a female child with a familial history of chronic hemolytic anemia. She was diagnosed with Hb Volga (HBB: c.83C>A) at the age of 7 months. At age 6, treatment options were reconsidered due to increasing fatigue and decreasing Hb concentration. The second case also concerns a female child with chronic hemolytic anemia and icterus since the age of 5...
September 30, 2016: Hemoglobin
Clemence Deville, Cyril Garrouste, Paul Coppo, Bertrand Evrard, Alexandre Lautrette, Anne Elisabeth Heng
Antifactor H antibody (anti-CFHAb) is found in 6% to 25% cases of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in children, but has been only exceptionally reported in adults. There is no consensus about the best treatment for this type of aHUS. We report the case of an adult patient treated successfully with plasma exchange (PE), steroids, and rituximab.A 27-year-old Caucasian male presented to hospital with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. One week earlier, he had digestive problems with diarrhea...
September 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Shahrzad Bakhtiar, Frank Ruemmele, Fabienne Charbit-Henrion, Eva Lévy, Frédéric Rieux-Laucat, Nadine Cerf-Bensussan, Peter Bader, Ulrich Paetow
Monogenic primary immunodeficiency syndromes can affect one or more endocrine organs by autoimmunity during childhood. Clinical manifestations include type 1 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency, and vitiligo. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive beige-like anchor protein (LRBA) deficiency was described in 2012 as a novel primary immunodeficiency, predominantly causing immune dysregulation and early onset enteropathy. We describe the heterogeneous clinical course of LRBA deficiency in two siblings, mimicking an autoimmune polyendocrine disorder in one of them in presence of the same underlying genetic mutation...
2016: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Marta Subías Hidalgo, Hector Martin Merinero, Alicia López, Jaouad Anter, Sheila Pinto García, Fernando Ataúlfo Gonzalez-Fernández, Rafael Forés, Margarita Lopez-Trascasa, Ana Villegas, Emilio Ojeda, Santiago Rodríguez de Córdoba
Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hemolytic anemia characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis that is effectively treated with eculizumab. However, treatment responses are reported heterogeneous with some patients presenting residual hemolysis and requiring RBC transfusions. Recent reports have shown that both extravascular hemolysis and incomplete C5 blockade can explain these suboptimal hematological responses. Here we have tested our eculizumab-treated PNH patients (n=12) for signs of hemolysis and assessed complement biomarkers...
September 13, 2016: Immunobiology
Aliou Thiongane, Aliou Abdoulaye Ndongo, Idrissa Demba Ba, Djibril Boiro, Papa Moctar Faye, Younoussa Keita, Aïssatou Ba, Djeynaba Fafa Cissé, Idrissa Basse, Lamine Thiam, Indou Déme Ly, Babacar Niang, Abou Ba, Amadou Lamine Fall, Saliou Diouf, Ousmane Ndiaye, Mamadou Ba, Mamadou Sarr
Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a common cause of organic acute renal failure (ARF) in children. It is a progressive complication of acute gastroenteritis (AGE), especially caused by Escherichia coli in children. This study aimed to describe the clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of this affection in four children. We collected four cases of HUS. The average age was 10,5 months (5-15mois), exclusively boys. Clinical examination revealed a hemolytic anemia (pallor and jaundice), oligoanuria and edematous syndrome (2 cases), arterial hypertension (1 patient), AGE associated with severe dehydration and hypovolemic shock (2 patients), consciousness disorders...
2016: Pan African Medical Journal
Tsukasa Oshima, Masayasu Ikutomi, Hiroki Shinohara, Jumpei Ishiwata, Keiko Fukino, Toshihiro Amaki, Fumitaka Nakamura
Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare but lethal multisystem disease characterized by peripheral thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, fever, and various stages of renal and neurological dysfunctions.(1,2)) The causes of TMA are mainly thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) or hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), and cases of TMA related to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are quite rare. Herein, we report a case of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) caused by TMA which is strongly suspected to have a relationship to MDS, and discuss the treatment of our patient who needed antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy after AMI, while on the other hand, had pancytopenia and a bleeding event due to MDS...
September 28, 2016: International Heart Journal
Arun Panigrahi, Amy Clark, John Myers, Ashok Raj
BACKGROUND: Successful treatment of both pediatric autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), specifically those that are refractory to first-line therapies, remains unsatisfactory in terms of long-term remission and medication side effects. Here, we propose a novel combination therapy of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an adjunct immunosuppressive, and short-term corticosteroids for the treatment of persistent or chronic autoimmune cytopenias in children...
September 12, 2016: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Uroosa Ibrahim, Muhammad N Siddique, Gautam Valecha, Masoud Asgari, Edhan Isaac, Meekoo Dhar
A 46‑year‑old obese male with a medical history of thalassemia minor presented to the emergency room with complaints of severe fatigue and jaundice worsening over two weeks. On further evaluation, the patient was found to have significant hyperbilirubinemia and transaminitis. The hospital course was further complicated by pancytopenia requiring multiple transfusions, worsening hyperbilirubinemia, severe hyperferritinemia, hypofibrinogenemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. He was also found to have splenomegaly and evidence of hemophagocytosis on bone marrow biopsy...
2016: Curēus
Christian Brendel, Swaroopa Guda, Raffaele Renella, Daniel E Bauer, Matthew C Canver, Young-Jo Kim, Matthew M Heeney, Denise Klatt, Jonathan Fogel, Michael D Milsom, Stuart H Orkin, Richard I Gregory, David A Williams
Reducing expression of the fetal hemoglobin (HbF) repressor BCL11A leads to a simultaneous increase in γ-globin expression and reduction in β-globin expression. Thus, there is interest in targeting BCL11A as a treatment for β-hemoglobinopathies, including sickle cell disease (SCD) and β-thalassemia. Here, we found that using optimized shRNAs embedded within an miRNA (shRNAmiR) architecture to achieve ubiquitous knockdown of BCL11A profoundly impaired long-term engraftment of both human and mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) despite a reduction in nonspecific cellular toxicities...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Suzie A Noronha, S Christy Sadreameli, John J Strouse
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a heterogeneous inherited disorder of hemoglobin that causes chronic hemolytic anemia, vaso-occlusion, and endothelial dysfunction. These physiologic derangements often lead to multiorgan damage in infancy and throughout childhood. The most common types of SCD are homozygous hemoglobin S (HbSS disease), hemoglobin SC disease, and sickle β thalassemia. HbSS disease and sickle β(0) thalassemia often are referred to as sickle cell anemia because they have similar severity. Screening and preventive measures, including infection prophylaxis and vaccination, have significantly improved outcomes for children with SCD...
September 2016: Southern Medical Journal
Isabelle Signolet, Rachel Chenouard, Florine Oca, Magalie Barth, Pascal Reynier, Marie-Christine Denis, Gilles Simard
Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline...
September 2016: Pediatrics
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