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alzheimer AND communication

Horrolein Arab, Soleiman Mahjoub, Karimollah Hajian-Tilaki, Mehdi Moghadasi
BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent degenerative disorder of the brain among elderly individuals. Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is an important pathogenic factor which involves oxidizing macromolecules such as DNA, lipids, and proteins in AD. Green tea is a rich source of antioxidant compounds that can remove radical oxygen species. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of green tea consumption on markers of oxidative stress in AD...
2016: Caspian Journal of Internal Medicine
(no author information available yet)
BACKGROUND: Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1980 to 2015. These results informed an in-depth investigation of observed and expected mortality patterns based on sociodemographic measures. METHODS: We estimated all-cause mortality by age, sex, geography, and year using an improved analytical approach originally developed for GBD 2013 and GBD 2010...
October 8, 2016: Lancet
Walter J Lukiw
The human microbiome consists of ~3.8 × 10(13) symbiotic microorganisms that form a highly complex and dynamic ecosystem: the gastrointestinal (GI) tract constitutes the largest repository of the human microbiome by far, and its impact on human neurological health and disease is becoming increasingly appreciated. Bacteroidetes, the largest phylum of Gram-negative bacteria in the GI tract microbiome, while generally beneficial to the host when confined to the GI tract, have potential to secrete a remarkably complex array of pro-inflammatory neurotoxins that include surface lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and toxic proteolytic peptides...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Seon Joo Park, Seung Hwan Lee, Heehong Yang, Chul Soon Park, Chang-Soo Lee, Oh Seok Kwon, Tai Hyun Park, Jyongsik Jang
In the brain and central nervous system, dopamine plays a crucial function as a neurotransmitter or a local chemical messenger for interneuronal communication. Dopamine is associated with renal, hormonal, and cardiovascular systems. Additionally, dopamine dysfunction is known to cause serious illnesses, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, dopamine detection is essential for medical diagnosis and disease prevention, which require a novel strategy with high sensitivity and selectivity, and with a rapid response...
October 7, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Xia Zhang, Wen-Juan Huang, Wei-Wei Chen
Alzheimer's diseases (AD) is the most common type of dementia and a neurodegenerative disease that occurs when the nerve cells in the brain die. The cause and treatment of AD remain unknown. However, AD is a disease that affects the brain, an organ that controls behavior. Accordingly, anything that can interact with the brain may affect this organ positively or negatively, thereby protecting or encouraging AD. In this regard, modern life encompasses microwaves for all issues including industrial, communications, medical and domestic tenders, and among all applications, the cell phone wave, which directly exposes the brain, continues to be the most used...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Marion Castera, Véronique Kuhn, Franck Medina
OBJECTIVE: Anomia is the second most common disorder after episodic memory loss in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Our objective was to develop a speech therapy protocol for patients with Alzheimer's disease (Mini-Mental State Examination or MMSE≥15) and suffering from a lack of words, in order to improve access to words. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: We stimulated the three stages in the men: - stimulation of lexical selection involved working on the multiple meanings of a word, searching for the relevant and specific features of a word in order to make a guess, and bringing to mind a target word from specific features; - stimulation of morphological encoding involved extracting the meaning of a morpheme by comparing two words, one of which is derived from the other, and then identifying the meaning of an affix by slipping it into a sentence; - phonological encoding was stimulated by the isolation of the initial two-syllable words and merging them to form a third word...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Saurabh Kumar Jha, Niraj Kumar Jha, Dhiraj Kumar, Renu Sharma, Abhishek Shrivastava, Rashmi K Ambasta, Pravir Kumar
The communication between neurons at synaptic junctions is an intriguing process that monitors the transmission of various electro-chemical signals in the central nervous system. Albeit any aberration in the mechanisms associated with transmission of these signals leads to loss of synaptic contacts in both the neocortex and hippocampus thereby causing insidious cognitive decline and memory dysfunction. Compelling evidence suggests that soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau serve as toxins in the dysfunction of synaptic plasticity and aberrant neurotransmitter (NT) release at synapses consequently causing a cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD)...
September 23, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Camelia Quek, Andrew F Hill
Extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, are small membranous vesicles released from many biotypes, contributing to the disease progression and spreading. These extracellular vesicles provide an important mode of cell-to-cell communication by delivering proteins, lipids and RNA to target cells. Exosomes are found associated with neurodegenerative diseases, which are characterised by progressive degeneration of neurons and often associated with misfolded protein. The common diseases include Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's diseases (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and the prion diseases...
September 19, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
M Ishwarya, R T Narendhirakannan
Neurological disorders are diseases of the brain, the spine, and the nerves that connect them. There are more than 600 diseases of the nervous system, such as brain tumors, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, and stroke as well as less familiar ones such as frontotemporal dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and other dementias; cerebrovascular diseases including stroke, migraine, and other headache disorders; multiple sclerosis; neuroinfections; brain tumors; traumatic disorders of the nervous system such as brain trauma; and neurological disorders as a result of malnutrition...
2016: Advances in Neurobiology
Mutlay Sayan, Brooke T Mossman
The concept of the inflammasome, a macromolecular complex sensing cell stress or danger signals and initiating inflammation, was first introduced approximately a decade ago. Priming and activation of these intracellular protein platforms trigger the maturation of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, most notably, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18, to promulgate innate immune defenses. Although classically studied in models of gout, Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis, the importance and mechanisms of action of inflammasome priming and activation have recently been elucidated in cells of the respiratory tract where they modulate the responses to a number of inhaled pathogenic particles and fibres...
2016: Particle and Fibre Toxicology
Peifen Chang, Xin Li, Chao Ma, Sisi Zhang, Zhen Liu, Kewei Chen, Lin Ai, Jingling Chang, Zhanjun Zhang
Polymorphisms of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) promoter rs405509 are related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The T/T allele of rs405509 decreases the transcription of the APOE gene and leads to impairments in a specific brain structural network in aged individuals; thus, it is an important risk factor for AD. However, it remains unknown whether rs405509 affects white matter networks during aging. Here, we investigated the effect of the rs405509 genotype (T/T versus G-allele) on age-related brain white matter structural networks via construction of the graph theory-based structural connectome using diffusion MRI data in a large cohort...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Sravani Musunuri, Payam Emami Khoonsari, Maria Mikus, Magnus Wetterhall, Anna Häggmark-Mänberg, Lars Lannfelt, Anna Erlandsson, Jonas Bergquist, Martin Ingelsson, Ganna Shevchenko, Peter Nilsson, Kim Kultima
BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of all dementia cases. AD neuropathology is characterized by the formation of extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated amyloid-β and tau, respectively. The disease mechanism has only been partially elucidated and is believed to also involve many other proteins. OBJECTIVE: This study intended to perform a proteomic profiling of post mortem AD brains and compare it with control brains as well as brains from other neurological diseases to gain insight into the disease pathology...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Stefan Sturm, Anton Forsberg, Stephane Nave, Per Stenkrona, Nicholas Seneca, Andrea Varrone, Robert A Comley, Patrik Fazio, Candice Jamois, Ryuji Nakao, Zbigniew Ejduk, Nabil Al-Tawil, Ulrika Akenine, Christer Halldin, Niels Andreasen, Benedicte Ricci
PURPOSE: In Alzheimer's disease (AD), increased metabolism of monoamines by monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) leads to the production of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the MAO-B enzyme may restore brain levels of monoaminergic neurotransmitters, reduce the formation of toxic ROS and reduce neuroinflammation (reactive astrocytosis), potentially leading to neuroprotection. Sembragiline (also referred as RO4602522, RG1577 and EVT 302 in previous communications) is a potent, selective and reversible inhibitor of MAO-B developed as a potential treatment for AD...
September 16, 2016: European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Hyun-Eui Kim, Ana Rodrigues Grant, Milos S Simic, Rebecca A Kohnz, Daniel K Nomura, Jenni Durieux, Celine E Riera, Melissa Sanchez, Erik Kapernick, Suzanne Wolff, Andrew Dillin
Defects in mitochondrial metabolism have been increasingly linked with age-onset protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's. In response to protein-folding stress, compartment-specific unfolded protein responses (UPRs) within the ER, mitochondria, and cytosol work in parallel to ensure cellular protein homeostasis. While perturbation of individual compartments can make other compartments more susceptible to protein stress, the cellular conditions that trigger cross-communication between the individual UPRs remain poorly understood...
September 8, 2016: Cell
Jean Mullins, Donna Z Bliss, Sharon Rolnick, Casey Arntson Henre, Jody Jackson
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine barriers to communicating with healthcare professionals and health literacy about incontinence among different types of informal caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD). DESIGN: Descriptive secondary analysis. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The sample included 48 family/friend adult caregivers of individuals who had AD. Seventy-five percent were female; their mean age was 64 ± 14 years (mean ± SD)...
September 2016: Journal of Wound, Ostomy, and Continence Nursing
Hilaree N Frazier, Shaniya Maimaiti, Katie L Anderson, Lawrence D Brewer, John C Gant, Nada M Porter, Olivier Thibault
Neuroscientists studying normal brain aging, spinal cord injury, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative diseases have focused considerable effort on carefully characterizing intracellular perturbations in calcium dynamics or levels. At the cellular level, calcium is known for controlling life and death and orchestrating most events in between. For many years, intracellular calcium has been recognized as an essential ion associated with nearly all cellular functions from cell growth to degeneration...
August 20, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Fernanda Marques, João Carlos Sousa, Alexandra Brito, Jens Pahnke, Cecilia Santos, Margarida Correia-Neves, Joana Almeida Palha
This article brings the choroid plexus into the context of health and disease. It is remarkable that the choroid plexus, composed by the monolayer of epithelial cells that lie in a highly vascularized stroma, floating within the brain ventricles, gets so little attention in major physiology and medicine text books and in the scientific literature in general. Consider that it is responsible for producing most of the about 150mL of cerebrospinal fluid that fills the brain ventricles and the subarachnoid space and surrounds the spinal cord in the adult human brain, which is renewed approximately 2-3 times daily...
August 18, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Britta Engelhardt, Roxana O Carare, Ingo Bechmann, Alexander Flügel, Jon D Laman, Roy O Weller
Immune privilege of the central nervous system (CNS) has been ascribed to the presence of a blood-brain barrier and the lack of lymphatic vessels within the CNS parenchyma. However, immune reactions occur within the CNS and it is clear that the CNS has a unique relationship with the immune system. Recent developments in high-resolution imaging techniques have prompted a reassessment of the relationships between the CNS and the immune system. This review will take these developments into account in describing our present understanding of the anatomical connections of the CNS fluid drainage pathways towards regional lymph nodes and our current concept of immune cell trafficking into the CNS during immunosurveillance and neuroinflammation...
September 2016: Acta Neuropathologica
Hossein Mahmoudvand, Vahid Sheibani, Khadijeh Esmaeelpour, Seyed Reza Mirbadie, Saeideh Shojaee, Hamid Daneshvar, Ali Reza Keyhani, Naser Ziaali
Here, we hypothesized that in chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection communication among immune cells promotes neuroinflammation through cytokine networks and potentiate cognitive impairments in BALB/c mice with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The animal model of Toxoplasma infection was established by the intraperitoneal inoculation of 20-25 tissue cysts from Tehran strain of T. gondii. We injected amyloid-beta 1-42 peptide (Aβ1-42, 1 and 2 µL) into the hippocampus of BALB/c mice to establish an animal model of AD...
August 11, 2016: Journal of Parasitology
Kaiko Kuwamura, Shuichi Nishio, Shinichi Sato
This work presents a case study on fieldwork in a group home for the elderly with dementia using a teleoperated robot called Telenoid. We compared Telenoid-mediated and face-to-face conditions with three residents with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The result indicates that two of the three residents with moderate AD showed a positive reaction to Telenoid. Both became less nervous while communicating with Telenoid from the time they were first introduced to it. Moreover, they started to use more body gestures in the face-to-face condition and more physical interactions in the Telenoid-mediated condition...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
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