Read by QxMD icon Read

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Sarah E Ali-Khan, Antoine Jean, Emily MacDonald, E Richard Gold
Mounting evidence indicates that worldwide, innovation systems are increasing unsustainable. Equally, concerns about inequities in the science and innovation process, and in access to its benefits, continue. Against a backdrop of growing health, economic and scientific challenges global stakeholders are urgently seeking to spur innovation and maximize the just distribution of benefits for all. Open Science collaboration (OS) - comprising a variety of approaches to increase open, public, and rapid mobilization of scientific knowledge - is seen to be one of the most promising ways forward...
2018: MNI Open Res
Firdausi Qadri, Mohammad Ali, Julia Lynch, Fahima Chowdhury, Ashraful Islam Khan, Thomas F Wierzba, Jean-Louis Excler, Amit Saha, Md Taufiqul Islam, Yasmin A Begum, Taufiqur R Bhuiyan, Farhana Khanam, Mohiul I Chowdhury, Iqbal Ansary Khan, Alamgir Kabir, Baizid Khoorshid Riaz, Afroza Akter, Arifuzzaman Khan, Muhammad Asaduzzaman, Deok Ryun Kim, Ashraf U Siddik, Nirod C Saha, Alejandro Cravioto, Ajit P Singh, John D Clemens
BACKGROUND: A single-dose regimen of inactivated whole-cell oral cholera vaccine (OCV) is attractive because it reduces logistical challenges for vaccination and could enable more people to be vaccinated. Previously, we reported the efficacy of a single dose of an OCV vaccine during the 6 months following dosing. Herein, we report the results of 2 years of follow-up. METHODS: In this placebo-controlled, double-blind trial done in Dhaka, Bangladesh, individuals aged 1 year or older with no history of receipt of OCV were randomly assigned to receive a single dose of inactivated OCV or oral placebo...
March 14, 2018: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Justin Lessler, Sean M Moore, Francisco J Luquero, Heather S McKay, Rebecca Grais, Myriam Henkens, Martin Mengel, Jessica Dunoyer, Maurice M'bangombe, Elizabeth C Lee, Mamoudou Harouna Djingarey, Bertrand Sudre, Didier Bompangue, Robert S M Fraser, Abdinasir Abubakar, William Perea, Dominique Legros, Andrew S Azman
BACKGROUND: Cholera remains a persistent health problem in sub-Saharan Africa and worldwide. Cholera can be controlled through appropriate water and sanitation, or by oral cholera vaccination, which provides transient (∼3 years) protection, although vaccine supplies remain scarce. We aimed to map cholera burden in sub-Saharan Africa and assess how geographical targeting could lead to more efficient interventions. METHODS: We combined information on cholera incidence in sub-Saharan Africa (excluding Djibouti and Eritrea) from 2010 to 2016 from datasets from WHO, Médecins Sans Frontières, ProMED, ReliefWeb, ministries of health, and the scientific literature...
March 1, 2018: Lancet
Joao Paulo Souza, Olufemi T Oladapo, Bukola Fawole, Kidza Mugerwa, Rodrigo Reis, Francisco Barbosa-Junior, Livia Oliveira-Ciabati, Domingos Alves, A Metin Gülmezoglu
OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of the WHO partograph alert line and other candidate predictors in the identification of women at risk of developing severe adverse birth outcomes DESIGN: a facility-based, multicentre, prospective cohort study. SETTING: 13 maternity hospitals located in Nigeria and Uganda. POPULATION: 9,995 women with spontaneous onset of labour presenting at cervical dilatation of ≤6 cm or undergoing induction of labour...
March 2, 2018: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Oluwasolape Olawore, Aaron A R Tobian, Joseph Kagaayi, Jeremiah M Bazaale, Betty Nantume, Grace Kigozi, Justine Nankinga, Fred Nalugoda, Gertrude Nakigozi, Godfrey Kigozi, Ronald H Gray, Maria J Wawer, Robert Ssekubugu, John S Santelli, Steven J Reynolds, Larry W Chang, David Serwadda, Mary K Grabowski
BACKGROUND: In sub-Saharan Africa, migrants typically have higher HIV prevalence than non-migrants; however, whether HIV acquisition typically precedes or follows migration is unknown. We aimed to investigate the risk of HIV after migration in Rakai District, Uganda. METHODS: In a prospective population-based cohort of HIV-negative participants aged 15-49 years in Rakai, Uganda, between April 6, 1999, and Jan 30, 2015, we assessed the association between migration and HIV acquisition...
February 23, 2018: Lancet HIV
Joshua N Sampson, Allan Hildesheim, Rolando Herrero, Paula Gonzalez, Aimee Kreimer, Mitchell H Gail
Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 cause about 70% of all cervical cancers. Clinical trials have demonstrated that three doses of either commercially available HPV vaccine, Cervarix or Gardasil, prevent most new HPV 16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions. Based on evidence of immunological non-inferiority, 2-dose regimens have been licensed for adolescents in the United States, European Union, and elsewhere. However, if a single dose were effective, vaccine costs would be reduced substantially and the logistics of vaccination would be greatly simplified, enabling vaccination programs in developing countries...
February 20, 2018: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Julie E Bines, Jarir At Thobari, Cahya Dewi Satria, Amanda Handley, Emma Watts, Daniel Cowley, Hera Nirwati, James Ackland, Jane Standish, Frances Justice, Gabrielle Byars, Katherine J Lee, Graeme L Barnes, Novilia S Bachtiar, Ajeng Viska Icanervilia, Karen Boniface, Nada Bogdanovic-Sakran, Daniel Pavlic, Ruth F Bishop, Carl D Kirkwood, Jim P Buttery, Yati Soenarto
BACKGROUND: A strategy of administering a neonatal rotavirus vaccine at birth to target early prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis may address some of the barriers to global implementation of a rotavirus vaccine. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in Indonesia to evaluate the efficacy of an oral human neonatal rotavirus vaccine (RV3-BB) in preventing rotavirus gastroenteritis. Healthy newborns received three doses of RV3-BB, administered according to a neonatal schedule (0 to 5 days, 8 weeks, and 14 weeks of age) or an infant schedule (8 weeks, 14 weeks, and 18 weeks of age), or placebo...
February 22, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
Mark M Janko, Seth R Irish, Brian J Reich, Marc Peterson, Stephanie M Doctor, Melchior Kashamuka Mwandagalirwa, Joris L Likwela, Antoinette K Tshefu, Steven R Meshnick, Michael E Emch
Background: The relationship between agriculture, Anopheles mosquitoes, and malaria in Africa is not fully understood, but it is important for malaria control as countries consider expanding agricultural projects to address population growth and food demand. Therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of agriculture on Anopheles biting behaviour and malaria risk in children in rural areas of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DR Congo). Methods: We did a population-based, cross-sectional, spatial study of rural children (<5 years) in the DR Congo...
February 2018: Lancet. Planetary Health
Leonardo Martinez, David M le Roux, Whitney Barnett, Attie Stadler, Mark P Nicol, Heather J Zar
Background: Tuberculosis is a leading cause of global childhood mortality. However, the epidemiology and burden of tuberculosis in infancy is not well understood. We aimed to investigate tuberculin skin test conversion and tuberculosis in the Drakenstein Child Health study, a South African birth cohort in a community in which tuberculosis incidence is hyperendemic. Methods: In this prospective birth cohort study, we enrolled pregnant women older than 18 years who were between 20 and 28 weeks' gestation and who were attending antenatal care in a peri-urban, impoverished South African setting...
January 2018: Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Alec Morton, Ashwin Arulselvan, Ranjeeta Thomas
In recent years, donors such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have made an enormous contribution to the reduction of the global burden of disease. It has been argued that such donors should prioritise interventions based on their cost-effectiveness, that is to say, the ratio of costs to benefits. Against this, we argue that the donor should fund not the most cost-effective interventions, but rather interventions which are just cost-ineffective for the country, thus encouraging the country to contribute its own domestic resources to the fight against disease...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Health Economics
Christopher Troeger, Danny V Colombara, Puja C Rao, Ibrahim A Khalil, Alexandria Brown, Thomas G Brewer, Richard L Guerrant, Eric R Houpt, Karen L Kotloff, Kavita Misra, William A Petri, James Platts-Mills, Mark S Riddle, Scott J Swartz, Mohammad H Forouzanfar, Robert C Reiner, Simon I Hay, Ali H Mokdad
BACKGROUND: Diarrhoea is a leading cause of death and illness globally among children younger than 5 years. Mortality and short-term morbidity cause substantial burden of disease but probably underestimate the true effect of diarrhoea on population health. This underestimation is because diarrhoeal diseases can negatively affect early childhood growth, probably through enteric dysfunction and impaired uptake of macronutrients and micronutrients. We attempt to quantify the long-term sequelae associated with childhood growth impairment due to diarrhoea...
March 2018: Lancet Global Health
Alassane Dicko, Michelle E Roh, Halimatou Diawara, Almahamoudou Mahamar, Harouna M Soumare, Kjerstin Lanke, John Bradley, Koualy Sanogo, Daouda T Kone, Kalifa Diarra, Sekouba Keita, Djibrilla Issiaka, Sekou F Traore, Charles McCulloch, Will J R Stone, Jimee Hwang, Olaf Müller, Joelle M Brown, Vinay Srinivasan, Chris Drakeley, Roly Gosling, Ingrid Chen, Teun Bousema
BACKGROUND: Primaquine and methylene blue are gametocytocidal compounds that could prevent Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of primaquine and methylene blue in preventing human to mosquito transmission of P falciparum among glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-normal, gametocytaemic male participants. METHODS: This was a phase 2, single-blind, randomised controlled trial done at the Clinical Research Centre of the Malaria Research and Training Centre (MRTC) of the University of Bamako (Bamako, Mali)...
February 5, 2018: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Freya M Shearer, Joshua Longbottom, Annie J Browne, David M Pigott, Oliver J Brady, Moritz U G Kraemer, Fatima Marinho, Sergio Yactayo, Valdelaine E M de Araújo, Aglaêr A da Nóbrega, Nancy Fullman, Sarah E Ray, Jonathan F Mosser, Jeffrey D Stanaway, Stephen S Lim, Robert C Reiner, Catherine L Moyes, Simon I Hay, Nick Golding
BACKGROUND: Yellow fever cases are under-reported and the exact distribution of the disease is unknown. An effective vaccine is available but more information is needed about which populations within risk zones should be targeted to implement interventions. Substantial outbreaks of yellow fever in Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Brazil, coupled with the global expansion of the range of its main urban vector, Aedes aegypti, suggest that yellow fever has the propensity to spread further internationally...
February 1, 2018: Lancet Global Health
Roberto Amato, Richard D Pearson, Jacob Almagro-Garcia, Chanaki Amaratunga, Pharath Lim, Seila Suon, Sokunthea Sreng, Eleanor Drury, Jim Stalker, Olivo Miotto, Rick M Fairhurst, Dominic P Kwiatkowski
BACKGROUND: Antimalarial resistance is rapidly spreading across parts of southeast Asia where dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine is used as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The first published reports about resistance to antimalarial drugs came from western Cambodia in 2013. Here, we analyse genetic changes in the P falciparum population of western Cambodia in the 6 years before those reports. METHODS: We analysed genome sequence data on 1492 P falciparum samples from 11 locations across southeast Asia, including 464 samples collected in western Cambodia between 2007 and 2013...
February 1, 2018: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Thuy-Nhien Nguyen, Lorenz von Seidlein, Tuong-Vy Nguyen, Phuc-Nhi Truong, Son Do Hung, Huong-Thu Pham, Tam-Uyen Nguyen, Thanh Dong Le, Van Hue Dao, Mavuto Mukaka, Nicholas Pj Day, Nicholas J White, Arjen M Dondorp, Guy E Thwaites, Tran Tinh Hien
BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of Plasmodium species infections are asymptomatic with densities too low to be detectable with standard diagnostic techniques. The importance of such asymptomatic plasmodium infections in malaria transmission is probably related to their duration and density. To explore the duration of asymptomatic plasmodium infections and changes in parasite densities over time, a cohort of participants who were infected with Plasmodium parasites was observed over a 2-year follow-up period...
February 1, 2018: Lancet Infectious Diseases
Clair Null, Christine P Stewart, Amy J Pickering, Holly N Dentz, Benjamin F Arnold, Charles D Arnold, Jade Benjamin-Chung, Thomas Clasen, Kathryn G Dewey, Lia C H Fernald, Alan E Hubbard, Patricia Kariger, Audrie Lin, Stephen P Luby, Andrew Mertens, Sammy M Njenga, Geoffrey Nyambane, Pavani K Ram, John M Colford
BACKGROUND: Poor nutrition and exposure to faecal contamination are associated with diarrhoea and growth faltering, both of which have long-term consequences for child health. We aimed to assess whether water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition interventions reduced diarrhoea or growth faltering. METHODS: The WASH Benefits cluster-randomised trial enrolled pregnant women from villages in rural Kenya and evaluated outcomes at 1 year and 2 years of follow-up. Geographically-adjacent clusters were block-randomised to active control (household visits to measure mid-upper-arm circumference), passive control (data collection only), or compound-level interventions including household visits to promote target behaviours: drinking chlorinated water (water); safe sanitation consisting of disposing faeces in an improved latrine (sanitation); handwashing with soap (handwashing); combined water, sanitation, and handwashing; counselling on appropriate maternal, infant, and young child feeding plus small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements from 6-24 months (nutrition); and combined water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition...
January 29, 2018: Lancet Global Health
Stephen P Luby, Mahbubur Rahman, Benjamin F Arnold, Leanne Unicomb, Sania Ashraf, Peter J Winch, Christine P Stewart, Farzana Begum, Faruqe Hussain, Jade Benjamin-Chung, Elli Leontsini, Abu M Naser, Sarker M Parvez, Alan E Hubbard, Audrie Lin, Fosiul A Nizame, Kaniz Jannat, Ayse Ercumen, Pavani K Ram, Kishor K Das, Jaynal Abedin, Thomas F Clasen, Kathryn G Dewey, Lia C Fernald, Clair Null, Tahmeed Ahmed, John M Colford
BACKGROUND: Diarrhoea and growth faltering in early childhood are associated with subsequent adverse outcomes. We aimed to assess whether water quality, sanitation, and handwashing interventions alone or combined with nutrition interventions reduced diarrhoea or growth faltering. METHODS: The WASH Benefits Bangladesh cluster-randomised trial enrolled pregnant women from villages in rural Bangladesh and evaluated outcomes at 1-year and 2-years' follow-up. Pregnant women in geographically adjacent clusters were block-randomised to one of seven clusters: chlorinated drinking water (water); upgraded sanitation (sanitation); promotion of handwashing with soap (handwashing); combined water, sanitation, and handwashing; counselling on appropriate child nutrition plus lipid-based nutrient supplements (nutrition); combined water, sanitation, handwashing, and nutrition; and control (data collection only)...
January 29, 2018: Lancet Global Health
Katharine A Collins, Claire Yt Wang, Matthew Adams, Hayley Mitchell, Melanie Rampton, Suzanne Elliott, Isaie J Reuling, Teun Bousema, Robert Sauerwein, Stephan Chalon, Jörg J Möhrle, James S McCarthy
BACKGROUND: Drugs and vaccines that can interrupt the transmission of Plasmodium falciparum will be important for malaria control and elimination. However, models for early clinical evaluation of candidate transmission-blocking interventions are currently unavailable. Here we describe a new model for evaluating malaria transmission from humans to Anopheles mosquitoes using controlled human malaria infection (CHMI). METHODS: Seventeen healthy malaria-naïve volunteers underwent CHMI by intravenous inoculation of P...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Bernadette Li, Alec Miners, Haleema Shakur, Ian Roberts
BACKGROUND: Sub-Saharan Africa and southern Asia account for almost 85% of global maternal deaths from post-partum haemorrhage. Early administration of tranexamic acid, within 3 h of giving birth, was shown to reduce the risk of death due to bleeding in women with post-partum haemorrhage in the World Maternal Antifibrinolytic (WOMAN) trial. We aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of early administration of tranexamic acid for treatment of post-partum haemorrhage. METHODS: For this economic evaluation we developed a decision model to assess the cost-effectiveness of the addition of tranexamic acid to usual care for treatment of women with post-partum haemorrhage in Nigeria and Pakistan...
February 2018: Lancet Global Health
Andrew Q Ford, Nancy Touchette, B Fenton Hall, Angela Hwang, Joachim Hombach
Building on the success of the first Global Vaccine and Immunization Research Forum (GVIRF), the World Health Organization, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health in the United States of America, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation convened the second GVIRF in March 2016. Leading scientists, vaccine developers, and public health officials from around the world discussed scientific advances and innovative technologies to design and deliver vaccines as well as novel tools and approaches to increase the uptake of vaccines throughout the world...
January 12, 2018: Vaccine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"