Read by QxMD icon Read

stress, brain

Ernestina Hernández García, Norma Osnaya Brizuela, Armando Valenzuela Peraza, David Calderón Guzmán, Maribel Ortiz Herrera, Hugo Juárez Olguín, Gerardo Barragán Mejía, Daniel Santamaría Del Ángel, Alberto Rojas Ochoa
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of splenda and stevia on dopamine and 5-HIAA levels, and some biomarkers of oxidative stress in the presence of cytarabine. METHODS: Forty-eight young male Wistar rats each with a weight of 80 g (four weeks of age), distributed in six groups of eight animals each, were treated as follows: group 1, control (NaCl 0.9% vehicle); group 2, cytarabine (0.6 g/kg); group 3, stevia (0.6 g/kg); group 4, cytarabine + stevia; group 5, splenda; and group 6, cytarabine + splenda...
February 13, 2018: Nutrición Hospitalaria: Organo Oficial de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Parenteral y Enteral
Viktória Varga, János Németh, Orsolya Oláh, Valéria Tóth-Szűki, Viktória Kovács, Gábor Remzső, Ferenc Domoki
Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has an established role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). In this study we sought to determine whether COX-2 was induced by asphyxia in newborn pigs, and whether neuronal COX-2 levels were affected by H2 treatment. Piglets were subjected to either 8 min of asphyxia or a more severe 20 min of asphyxia followed by H2 treatment (inhaling room air containing 2.1% H2 for 4 h). COX-2 immunohistochemistry was performed on brain samples from surviving piglets 24 h after asphyxia...
March 22, 2018: Acta Pharmacologica Sinica
Shibin Song, Yimin Chen, Feng Han, Minghao Dong, Xin Xiang, Jianmei Sui, Yuming Li, Hua Yang, Jian Liu
Aloperine (ALO) exhibits neuroprotective effects against oxidative stress in vitro ; however, its protective effect in early brain injury (EBI) following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains to be elucidated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of ALO in EBI, and its association with nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 and the antioxidant responsive element (Nrf2-ARE) survival pathway. In the present study, an experimental SAH model was induced in rats following a prechiasmatic cistern injection...
April 2018: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Claudia Cristiano, Adriano Lama, Francesca Lembo, Maria P Mollica, Antonio Calignano, Giuseppina Mattace Raso
Pre- and post-natal factors can affect brain development and function, impacting health outcomes with particular relevance to neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Maternal obesity and its associated complications have been related to the increased risk of ASDs in offspring. Indeed, animals exposed to maternal obesity or high fat diets are prone to social communication impairment and repetitive behavior, the hallmarks of autism. During development, fatty acids and sugars, as well as satiety hormones, like insulin and leptin, and inflammatory factors related to obesity-induced low grade inflammation, could play a role in the impairment of neuroendocrine system and brain neuronal circuits regulating behavior in offspring...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
Lianne Hoeijmakers, Anna Amelianchik, Fleur Verhaag, Janssen Kotah, Paul J Lucassen, A Korosi
Life-time experiences are thought to influence the risk to develop the neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD). In particular, early-life stress (ES) may modulate the onset and progression of AD. There is recent evidence by our group and others that AD-related neuropathological progression and the associated neuroimmune responses are modulated by ES in the classic APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model for AD. We here extend our previous study on ES mediated modulation of neuropathology and neuroinflammation and address in the same cohort of mice whether ES accelerates and/or aggravates AD-induced cognitive decline and alterations in the process of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN), a form of brain plasticity...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Oliver Edenharter, Stephan Schneuwly, Juan A Navarro
Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is the most important recessive ataxia in the Caucasian population. It is caused by a deficit of the mitochondrial protein frataxin. Despite its pivotal effect on biosynthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and mitochondrial energy production, little is known about the influence of frataxin depletion on homeostasis of the cellular mitochondrial network. We have carried out a forward genetic screen to analyze genetic interactions between genes controlling mitochondrial homeostasis and Drosophila frataxin...
2018: Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Kelly S Kimple, Susan M Kansagra
In working to improve the health of North Carolinians, a broader emphasis has been placed on determinants of health, or non-medical drivers of health. Critical examples of health determinants are adverse childhood experiences, or ACEs, that affect early brain development and lifelong health and function. Multiple organizations and communities have come together to acknowledge the importance of prevention, address toxic stress and trauma in childhood, promote resiliency and trauma-informed care, and invest in the future of North Carolina through its children...
March 2018: North Carolina Medical Journal
Lesley Hoyles, Tom Snelling, Umm-Kulthum Umlai, Jeremy K Nicholson, Simon R Carding, Robert C Glen, Simon McArthur
BACKGROUND: Gut microbiota composition and function are symbiotically linked with host health and altered in metabolic, inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Three recognised mechanisms exist by which the microbiome influences the gut-brain axis: modification of autonomic/sensorimotor connections, immune activation, and neuroendocrine pathway regulation. We hypothesised interactions between circulating gut-derived microbial metabolites, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) also contribute to the gut-brain axis...
March 21, 2018: Microbiome
Ewelina Bratek, Apolonia Ziembowicz, Elzbieta Salinska
Hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) at the time of birth may cause neonatal death or lead to persistent brain damage. The search for an effective treatment of asphyxiated infants has not resulted in an effective therapy, and hypothermia remains the only available therapeutic strategy. Among possible experimental therapies, the induction of ischemic tolerance is promising. Recent investigations have shown that activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) can provide neuroprotection against H-I, but the mechanism of this effect is not clear...
March 17, 2018: Brain Sciences
Ralph N Martins, Victor Villemagne, Hamid R Sohrabi, Pratishtha Chatterjee, Tejal M Shah, Giuseppe Verdile, Paul Fraser, Kevin Taddei, Veer B Gupta, Stephanie R Rainey-Smith, Eugene Hone, Steve Pedrini, Wei Ling Lim, Ian Martins, Shaun Frost, Sunil Gupta, Sid O'Bryant, Alan Rembach, David Ames, Kathryn Ellis, Stephanie J Fuller, Belinda Brown, Samantha L Gardener, Binosha Fernando, Prashant Bharadwaj, Samantha Burnham, Simon M Laws, Anna M Barron, Kathryn Goozee, Eka J Wahjoepramono, Prita R Asih, James D Doecke, Olivier Salvado, Ashley I Bush, Christopher C Rowe, Samuel E Gandy, Colin L Masters
Worldwide there are over 46 million people living with dementia, and this number is expected to double every 20 years reaching about 131 million by 2050. The cost to the community and government health systems, as well as the stress on families and carers is incalculable. Over three decades of research into this disease have been undertaken by several research groups in Australia, including work by our original research group in Western Australia which was involved in the discovery and sequencing of the amyloid-β peptide (also known as Aβ or A4 peptide) extracted from cerebral amyloid plaques...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Patrizia Mecocci, Virginia Boccardi, Roberta Cecchetti, Patrizia Bastiani, Michela Scamosci, Carmelinda Ruggiero, Marta Baroni
The Editors of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease invited Professor Patrizia Mecocci to contribute a review article focused on the importance and implications of her research on aging, brain aging, and senile dementias over the last years. This invitation was based on an assessment that she was one of the journal's top authors and a strong supporter of the concept that oxidative stress is a major contributor to several alterations observed in age-related conditions (sarcopenia, osteoporosis) and, more significantly, in brain aging suggesting a pivotal role in the pathogenesis and progression of one of the most dramatic age-related diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD)...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
D Allan Butterfield, Debra Boyd-Kimball
Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its earlier stage, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). One source of oxidative stress in AD and aMCI brains is that associated with amyloid-β peptide, Aβ1-42 oligomers. Our laboratory first showed in AD elevated oxidative stress occurred in brain regions rich in Aβ1-42, but not in Aβ1-42-poor regions, and was among the first to demonstrate Aβ peptides led to lipid peroxidation (indexed by HNE) in AD and aMCI brains...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Julia R Clarke, Felipe C Ribeiro, Rudimar L Frozza, Fernanda G De Felice, Mychael V Lourenco
Clinical trials have extensively failed to find effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) so far. Even after decades of AD research, there are still limited options for treating dementia. Mounting evidence has indicated that AD patients develop central and peripheral metabolic dysfunction, and the underpinnings of such events have recently begun to emerge. Basic and preclinical studies have unveiled key pathophysiological mechanisms that include aberrant brain stress signaling, inflammation, and impaired insulin sensitivity...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Abhishek Ankur Balmik, Subashchandrabose Chinnathambi
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the major age related neurodegenerative diseases whose pathology arises due to the presence of two distinct protein aggregates, viz., amyloid-β plaques in extracellular matrix and tau neurofibrillary tangles in neurons. Multiple factors play a role in AD pathology, which includes familial mutations, oxidative stress, and post-translational modifications. Melatonin is an endocrine hormone, secreted during darkness, derived from tryptophan, and produced mainly by the pineal gland...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Sheila Sharp, Scott J Mitchell, Monique Vallée, Elena Kuzmanova, Michelle Cooper, Delia Belelli, Jeremy J Lambert, Jeffrey T-J Huang
Neurosteroids are brain-derived steroids, capable of rapidly modulating neuronal excitability in a non-genomic manner. Dysregulation of their synthesis, or metabolism has been implicated in many pathological conditions. Here, we describe an isotope dilution based targeted and non-targeted (ID-TNT) profiling of carbonyl neurosteroids/steroids. The method combines stable isotope dilution, hydroxylamine derivatization, high-resolution MS scanning and data dependent MS/MS analysis, allowing absolute quantification of pregnenolone, progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone, 3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone and 3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone, and relative quantification of other carbonyl containing steroids...
March 21, 2018: Analytical Chemistry
Sawsan Aboul-Fotouh, Mohamed Habib, Tarek Asaad, Samar K Kassim, Mohamed H Ghanem
Depression is the disease of the modern era. The lack of response to the available antidepressants, which were developed on the basis of the monoaminergic deficit hypothesis of depression, has encouraged scientists to think about new mechanisms explaining the pathogenesis of depression. In this context, the inflammatory theory has emerged to clarify many aspects of depression that the previous theories have failed to explain. Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) has a regulatory role in the brain's immune response to stress, and its activation is suggested to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of depression...
March 20, 2018: Behavioural Pharmacology
Athena E Theyers, Benjamin I Goldstein, Arron Ws Metcalfe, Andrew D Robertson, Bradley J MacIntosh
Arterial stiffness is linked to cerebral small vessel damage and neurodegeneration, but barriers to accessing deep cerebrovascular anatomy limit our ability to assess the brain. This study describes an adaptation of a cardiac-related scrubbing method as a means of generating blood oxygenation level-dependent pulsatility maps based on the cardiac cycle. We examine BOLD pulsatility at rest, based on the non-parametric deviation from null metric, as well as changes following acute physiological stress from 20 min of moderate-intensity cycling in 45 healthy adolescents...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Joseph Firth, Simon Rosenbaum, Philip B Ward, Jackie Curtis, Scott B Teasdale, Alison R Yung, Jerome Sarris
AIM: The effects of nutrient-based treatments, including adjunctive vitamin or antioxidant supplementation, have been explored extensively in long-term schizophrenia. However, no systematic evaluation of trials in "first-episode psychosis" (FEP) has been conducted, despite the potential benefits of using these treatments during the early stages of illness. Therefore, we aimed to review all studies examining efficacy, tolerability and the biological mechanisms of action, of nutrient supplementation in FEP...
March 21, 2018: Early Intervention in Psychiatry
A R Godunova, A A Rakhimova, O I Leontyeva, I G Talipova, R M Yakhin, Sh G Musin
AIM: To study an effect of submaximal doses of mexidol on the dynamics of biochemical markers of inflammation and damage to brain tissue in the acute period of ischemic stroke. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 60 patients admitted in the first 6h after disease onset with a verified ischemic stroke (7-9 points on the ASPECT scale) were enrolled in the study. Thirty patients in the study group received submaximal doses of mexidol: 750 mg infusion dropwise in 250 ml of 0...
2018: Zhurnal Nevrologii i Psikhiatrii Imeni S.S. Korsakova
Kimberly A Babson, Steven H Woodward, Marie Schaer, Sandra E Sephton, Danny G Kaloupek
BACKGROUND: Human studies have often found that brain regions rich in glucocorticoid receptors exhibit smaller volume in samples with past trauma and ongoing stress; however, relatively little research has addressed the hypothesis that such smaller volumes can be traced to elevated circulating glucocorticoid hormones (GCs). This issue takes on renewed interest in light of recent proposals to treat symptoms of stress disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with exogenous synthetic GCs...
May 2017: Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"