keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Athlete paradox

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29110300/dissociation-of-intramyocellular-lipid-storage-and-insulin-resistance-in-trained-athletes-and-type-2-diabetes-patients-involvement-of-perilipin-5
#1
Anne Gemmink, Sabine Daemen, Bram Brouwers, Peter R Huntjens, Gert Schaart, Esther Moonen-Kornips, Johanna Jörgensen, Joris Hoeks, Patrick Schrauwen, Matthijs K C Hesselink
Intramyocellular lipids (IMCL) hamper insulin sensitivity albeit not in endurance-trained athletes (Trained). Compared to type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM), Trained subjects have high levels of Perilipin 5 (PLIN5). Here, we tested if the fraction of PLIN5 coated LDs is a determinant of skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and contributes to the athlete's paradox. Muscle biopsies were taken from 8 Trained, Lean sedentary, Obese and T2DM subjects. Trained, Obese and T2DM subjects were matched for total IMCL content...
November 7, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29050661/the-olin-eilobi-breathing-techniques-description-and-initial-case-series-of-novel-respiratory-retraining-strategies-for-athletes-with-exercise-induced-laryngeal-obstruction
#2
Kristina L Johnston, Hannah Bradford, Heather Hodges, Camille M Moore, Emily Nauman, J Tod Olin
INTRODUCTION: Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO), the condition previously known as paradoxical vocal fold motion and vocal cord dysfunction, is characterized by inappropriate glottic or supraglottic obstruction during high-intensity exercise, causing exertional dyspnea, frequently with stridor. EILO is definitively diagnosed through upper-airway visualization during a characteristic episode. Although respiratory retraining is a primary therapy for EILO, many patients report symptom persistence despite adequate performance of traditional techniques...
October 11, 2017: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29050660/the-fortuitous-discovery-of-the-olin-eilobi-breathing-techniques-a-case-study
#3
Sarah Graham, Emily Deardorff, Kristina Johnston, J Tod Olin
Exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) is the term for the condition previously named vocal cord dysfunction and paradoxical vocal fold motion. It is defined by glottic or supraglottic obstruction during periods of intense exercise. Not all patients respond to conventional therapy with speech-language pathology, behavioral health interventions, and treatment of contributing conditions. In this edition of Journal of Voice, the authors describe a novel series of respiratory retraining techniques, now called Olin EILOBI (EILO biphasic inspiratory) breathing techniques, specifically designed for athletes with EILO...
October 11, 2017: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28978544/intramuscular-triglyceride-synthesis-importance-in-partitioning-muscle-lipids-in-humans
#4
Bryan C Bergman, Leigh Perreault, Allison Strauss, Samantha D Bacon, Anna A Kerege, Kathleen Harrison, Joseph T Brozinick, Devon M Hunerdosse, Mary C Playdon, William Holmes, Hai Hoang Bui, Phil Sanders, Parker Siddall, Tao Wei, Melissa K Thomas, Ming Shang Kuo, Robert H Eckel
Intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) concentration is elevated in insulin resistant individuals, and was once thought to promote insulin resistance. However, endurance trained athletes have equivalent concentration of IMTG compared to individuals with type 2 diabetes, and have very low risk of diabetes, termed the "athlete's paradox". We now know that IMTG synthesis is positively related to insulin sensitivity, but the exact mechanisms for this are unclear. To understand the relationship between IMTG synthesis and insulin sensitivity, we measured IMTG synthesis in obese control subjects, endurance trained athletes, and individuals with type 2 diabetes during rest, exercise, and recovery...
October 3, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28941236/using-plin-proteins-to-explain-the-athlete-s-paradox
#5
Logan K Townsend, Greg L McKie
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28913725/exercise-and-competitive-sport-physiology-adaptations-and-uncertain-long-term-risks
#6
REVIEW
Patrick T Gleason, Jonathan H Kim
The benefits of regular and moderate exercise training on cardiovascular outcomes have been well established. In addition, strenuous exercise training leads to corollary cardiac structural and functional adaptations that are sport-specific and facilitate athletic performance. In this review, the normal physiologic and hemodynamic changes that occur during exercise and the subsequent differential exercise-induced cardiac remodeling patterns that develop will be discussed. Paradoxically, recent data have raised concern about the long-term impact of higher doses of physical activity and exercise on mortality and cardiovascular health outcomes...
September 14, 2017: Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28767321/does-elite-success-trigger-mass-participation-in-table-tennis-an-analysis-of-trickle-down-effects-in-germany-france-and-austria
#7
Jan Haut, Christian Gaum
There is a widespread belief that success at the elite level leads to increasing mass participation in sports. However, this assumption is merely supported by empirical evidence and is analyzed here for the case of table tennis. Therefore long-term data (1964-2014) on participation in Germany, France and Austria is statistically tested for effects of success by the countries' athletes at international competitions. Results indicate that no general trickle-down effect can be confirmed for table tennis in the countries observed...
August 2, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577561/cameroonian-professional-soccer-players-and-risk-of-atherosclerosis
#8
Jobert Richie Nansseu, Vicky Jocelyne Ama Moor, Ruth Danielle M Takam, Bertrand Zing-Awona, Marcel Azabji-Kenfack, Francine Tankeu, Corinne M Tchoula, Bruno M Moukette, Jeanne Y Ngogang
BACKGROUND: Elevated titers of antibodies against oxidized low-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (ox-LDL-Ab) have been reported among professional athletes, paradoxically reflecting an increased risk of developing atherogenic and/or cardiovascular events. This study aimed to determine titers of ox-LDL-Ab in a group of Cameroonian professional soccer players, and evaluate their evolution during part of a competition season as well as the plasmatic antioxidant status to find out if this latter correlates with ox-LDL-Ab ...
June 2, 2017: BMC Research Notes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303472/chronic-exertional-compartment-syndrome-in-the-forearm-of-a-collegiate-softball-pitcher
#9
REVIEW
Austin Cole, John L Hiatt, Christopher Arnold, Terry Sites, Ramon Ylanon
BACKGROUND: Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is a recognized condition in the lower limb, with many reports in the literature. However, very few instances include CECS of the upper limb. This article presents the case of a collegiate softball pitcher presenting with CECS in her right forearm. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a softball player with CECS, with only one similar incident in a major league baseball player. PURPOSE: The rarity of this condition normally places it low on the differential diagnosis...
December 2017: Sports Medicine—Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28148461/measuring-quality-of-life-in-pediatric-paradoxical-vocal-fold-motion-using-the-sf-36v2
#10
Kershena S Liao, Paul E Kwak, Hazel Hewitt, Sarah Hollas, Julina Ongkasuwan
OBJECTIVES: Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) consists of intermittent adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration, resulting in stridor and worsened by anxiety and stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of PVFM on quality of life in our pediatric patient population. STUDY DESIGN: This is a prospective, descriptive survey study. METHODS: Thirty-nine consecutive patients (ages 12-17 years) presenting with a PVFM diagnosis for respiratory retraining sessions with speech-language pathology were recruited...
January 30, 2017: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139319/paradoxical-vocal-fold-motion-pvfm-in-pediatric-otolaryngology
#11
Blake Smith, Claudio Milstein, Bryan Rolfes, Samantha Anne
INTRODUCTION: Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) is a condition in which the vocal cords exhibit inappropriate inspiratory adduction, and it has been poorly studied in the pediatric population. METHODS: Pediatric patients diagnosed with PVCM by a pediatric otolaryngologist and doctor of speech pathology from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients in whom another cause for their respiratory disturbance was eventually identified were excluded. Patient demographics, characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were reviewed...
March 2017: American Journal of Otolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28049727/allosteric-transmission-along-a-loosely-structured-backbone-allows-a-cardiac-troponin-c-mutant-to-function-with-only-one-ca-2-ion
#12
Mayra de A Marques, Jose Renato Pinto, Adolfo H Moraes, Anwar Iqbal, Mariana T Q de Magalhães, Jamila Monteiro, Murilo M Pedrote, Martha M Sorenson, Jerson L Silva, Guilherme A P de Oliveira
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common cardiomyopathies and a major cause of sudden death in young athletes. The Ca(2+) sensor of the sarcomere, cardiac troponin C (cTnC), plays an important role in regulating muscle contraction. Although several cardiomyopathy-causing mutations have been identified in cTnC, the limited information about their structural defects has been mapped to the HCM phenotype. Here, we used high-resolution electron-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion (CPMG-RD), and affinity measurements of cTnC for the thin filament in reconstituted papillary muscles to provide evidence of an allosteric mechanism in mutant cTnC that may play a role to the HCM phenotype...
February 10, 2017: Journal of Biological Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792003/exercise-induced-changes-in-hematocrit-and-hematocrit-viscosity-ratio-in-male-rugby-players
#13
Emmanuelle Varlet-Marie, Jean-Frédéric Brun, Eric Raynaud de Mauverger, Christine Fédou
We investigated whether the concept of hematocrit/viscosity (h/η) ratio explains the "paradox of hematocrit in athletes", by calculating a "theoretical optimal hematocrit" (i.e., associated with the higher h/η value predicted with Quemada's equation from plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte rigidity index) before and after exercise. 14 rugby players (19-31 yr; weight 65.8-109.2 kg; height 1.7-1.96 m; BMI 21.7-33.1 kg/m2) underwent a standardized submaximal exercise session on cycloergometer corresponding to 225 kjoules over 30 min...
2016: Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27669445/triathletes-lose-their-advantageous-pain-modulation-under-acute-psychosocial-stress
#14
Nirit Geva, Jens Pruessner, Ruth Defrin
INTRODUCTION: Triathletes, who constantly engage in intensely stressful sport, were recently found to exhibit greater pain tolerance and more efficient pain inhibition capabilities than nonathletes. However, pain inhibition correlated negatively with retrospective reports of mental stress during training and competition. The aim of the current study was to test pain inhibition capabilities of triathletes under acute, controlled psychological stress manipulation. METHODS: Participants were 25 triathletes and ironman triathletes who underwent the measurement of pain threshold, pain intolerance, tonic suprathreshold pain, and conditioned pain modulation before and during exposure to the Montreal Imaging Stress Task (MIST)...
February 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27515336/when-an-increase-in-central-systolic-pressure-overrides-the%C3%A2-benefits-of%C3%A2-heart%C3%A2-rate-lowering
#15
REVIEW
Franz H Messerli, Stefano F Rimoldi, Sripal Bangalore, Chirag Bavishi, Stephane Laurent
An elevated resting heart rate has been unequivocally linked to adverse cardiovascular events. Conversely, a physiologically low heart rate may confer longevity benefits. Moreover, pharmacological heart rate lowering reduces cardiovascular outcomes in patients with heart failure, with the magnitude of the reduction associated with survival benefit. In contrast, pharmacological heart rate lowering paradoxically increases cardiovascular events in hypertension, possibly because it elicits a ventricular-vascular mismatch, leading to increased central systolic blood pressure (BP)...
August 16, 2016: Journal of the American College of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27445983/exercise-increases-and-browns-muscle-lipid-in-high-fat-diet-fed-mice
#16
Tiffany L Morton, Kornelia Galior, Cody McGrath, Xin Wu, Gunes Uzer, Guniz Bas Uzer, Buer Sen, Zhihui Xie, David Tyson, Janet Rubin, Maya Styner
Muscle lipid increases with high-fat feeding and diabetes. In trained athletes, increased muscle lipid is not associated with insulin resistance, a phenomenon known as the athlete's paradox. To understand if exercise altered the phenotype of muscle lipid, female C57BL/6 mice fed CTL or high-fat diet (HFD for 6 or 18 weeks) were further divided into sedentary or exercising groups (CTL-E or HFD-E) with voluntary access to running wheels for the last 6 weeks of experiments, running 6 h/night. Diet did not affect running time or distance...
2016: Frontiers in Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27418321/how-do-training-and-competition-workloads-relate-to-injury-the-workload-injury-aetiology-model
#17
REVIEW
Johann Windt, Tim J Gabbett
Injury aetiology models that have evolved over the previous two decades highlight a number of factors which contribute to the causal mechanisms for athletic injuries. These models highlight the pathway to injury, including (1) internal risk factors (eg, age, neuromuscular control) which predispose athletes to injury, (2) exposure to external risk factors (eg, playing surface, equipment), and finally (3) an inciting event, wherein biomechanical breakdown and injury occurs. The most recent aetiological model proposed in 2007 was the first to detail the dynamic nature of injury risk, whereby participation may or may not result in injury, and participation itself alters injury risk through adaptation...
March 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27408630/dysfunctional-breathing-and-reaching-one-s-physiological-limit-as-causes-of-exercise-induced-dyspnoea
#18
REVIEW
Julie Depiazzi, Mark L Everard
Excessive exercise-induced shortness of breath is a common complaint. For some, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is the primary cause and for a small minority there may be an alternative organic pathology. However for many, the cause will be simply reaching their physiological limit or be due to a functional form of dysfunctional breathing, neither of which require drug therapy.The physiological limit category includes deconditioned individuals, such as those who have been through intensive care and require rehabilitation, as well as the unfit and the fit competitive athlete who has reached their limit with both of these latter groups requiring explanation and advice...
June 2016: Breathe
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27218140/vitamin-d-deficiency-and-exercise-induced-laryngospasm-in-young-competitive-rowers
#19
Enrico Heffler, Matteo Bonini, Luisa Brussino, Paolo Solidoro, Giuseppe Guida, Monica Boita, Giuliana Nicolosi, Caterina Bucca
Exercise-induced dyspnea is common among adolescents and young adults and often originates from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Sometimes, dyspnea corresponds to exercise-induced laryngospasm (EILO), which is a paradoxical decrease in supraglottic/glottic area. Vitamin D deficiency, which occurs frequently at northern latitudes, might favor laryngospasm by impairing calcium transport and slowing striate muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vitamin D status has an influence on bronchial and laryngeal responses to exercise in young, healthy athletes...
July 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27159282/the-discovery-of-slowness-time-to-deconstruct-gretzky-s-and-messi-s-predictive-brains
#20
Thomas C Erren, Liz Kuffer, Andreas Pinger, J Valérie Groß
Jafari and Smith hypothesized that time during games may pass slower for the world's best football player, Lionel Messi, from Argentina. This hypothesis leads to two questions: How can we explain such temporal paradox and how could this explain his dominant performances? Remarkably, the Argentinian's case was preceded by the equally astonishing case of Wayne Gretzky: The Canadian considered ice hockey as a rather slow game and was the best player in the sport's history. Whether Messi's and Gretzky's motor neurons fire faster, (inter)act differently or whether other mechanisms are at (inter)play warrants targeted research...
2016: Chronobiology International
keyword
keyword
10794
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"