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"Blood flow restriction"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29448855/acute-effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-exercise-induced-free-radical-production-in-young-and-healthy-subjects
#1
Christoph Centner, Denise Zdzieblik, Patrick Dressler, Bruno Fink, Albert Gollhofer, Daniel König
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the acute local and systemic effects of low-load resistance exercise (30% 1RM) with partial vascular occlusion on exercise-induced free radical production and to compare these effects with other established training methods. Fifteen young and healthy males (25 ± 3 years) performed the following four sessions in a counterbalanced order on separate days: low-load resistance exercise (LI: 30% 1RM), low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (LIBR: 30% 1RM), high-load resistance exercise (HI: 80% 1RM) and an additional session without exercise but blood flow restriction only (BR)...
February 16, 2018: Free Radical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446524/impact-of-blood-flow-restricted-bodyweight-exercise-on-skeletal-muscle-adaptations
#2
J E Jakobsgaard, M Christiansen, P Sieljacks, J Wang, T Groennebaek, F de Paoli, K Vissing
This study ascertains the ability of bodyweight blood flow-restricted (BFR) exercise training to promote skeletal muscle adaptations of significance for muscle accretion and metabolism. Six healthy young individuals (three males and three females) performed six weeks of bodyweight BFR training. Each session consisted of five sets of sit-to-stand BFR exercise to volitional failure with 30-second inter-set recovery. Prior to, and at least 72 h after training, muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis to assess changes in fibre type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell (SC) and myonuclei content and capillarization, as well as mitochondrial protein expression...
February 15, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29415981/acute-exertional-compartment-syndrome-with-rhabdomyolysis-case-report-and-review-of-literature
#3
Brandon McKinney, Christopher Gaunder, Ross Schumer
BACKGROUND Acute exertional compartment syndrome (AECS) is a rare cause of leg pain often associated with a delay in diagnosis and potentially leading to irreversible muscle and nerve damage. CASE REPORT We present the case of a previously healthy, high-level athlete who presented with the acute onset of unilateral anterior leg pain and foot drop the day after a strenuous workout. He was diagnosed with compartment syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. His management included emergent fluid resuscitation, fasciotomies, debridement of necrotic muscle from his anterior compartment, and delayed primary closure...
February 8, 2018: American Journal of Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29393688/systematic-review-of-high-level-mobility-training-in-people-with-a-neurological-impairment
#4
Tanja Spencer, Sara Aldous, Gavin Williams, Michael Fahey
AIM: The objective of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of interventions targeting high-level mobility skills in people with a neurological impairment. METHODS: A comprehensive electronic database search was conducted. Study designs were graded using the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) system and methodological quality was described using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. RESULTS: Twelve exploratory studies (AACPDM levels IV/V), of limited methodological quality (PEDro scores of 2-3 out of 10), were included...
February 2, 2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29389691/the-effect-of-ischemic-preconditioning-on-maximal-swimming-performance
#5
N Williams, M Russell, C J Cook, L P Kilduff
The effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on swimming performance was examined. Using a randomized, crossover design, National-and International-level swimmers (n=20; 14 males, 6 females) participated in three trials (Con, IPC-2h, IPC-24h). Lower-body IPC (4 x 5 min bi-lateral blood-flow restriction at 160-228 mmHg, and 5 min reperfusion) was used 2- (IPC-2h) or 24-h (IPC-24h) before a self-selected (100 m, n=15; 200 m, n=5) swimming time-trial (TT). The Con trial used a sham intervention (15 mmHg) 2h prior to exercise...
January 30, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29383885/increased-fxyd1-and-pgc-1%C3%AE-mrna-after-blood-flow-restricted-running-is-related-to-fibre-type-specific-ampk-signalling-and-oxidative-stress-in-human-muscle
#6
Danny Christiansen, Robyn M Murphy, Jens Bangsbo, Christos G Stathis, David J Bishop
AIM: This study explored the effects of blood flow restriction (BFR) on mRNA responses of PGC-1α (total, 1α1, and 1α4) and Na+ ,K+ -ATPase isoforms (NKA; α1-3 , β1-3 , and FXYD1) to an interval running session, and determined if these effects were related to increased oxidative stress, hypoxia, and fibre type-specific AMPK and CaMKII signalling, in human skeletal muscle. METHODS: In a randomised, crossover fashion, eight healthy men (26 ± 5 y and 57.4 ± 6...
January 31, 2018: Acta Physiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29356291/blood-flow-restriction-and-cuff-width-effect-on-blood-flow-in-the-legs
#7
J Grant Mouser, Scott J Dankel, Kevin T Mattocks, Matthew B Jessee, Samuel L Buckner, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P Loenneke
Much of the literature examining blood flow restriction in the lower body uses cuffs of differing widths. It is currently unknown whether similar relative pressures using cuffs of differing widths elicit the same blood flow response. PURPOSE: To examine the hemodynamic responses to relative pressures using two commonly used cuffs (10 and 12 cm). METHODS: In a random order over two laboratory visits, one cuff was applied to the right proximal thigh of the participant (men = 17, women = 14), and arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) was measured...
January 21, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29350278/lower-body-blood-flow-restriction-training-may-induce-remote-muscle-strength-adaptations-in-an-active-unrestricted-arm
#8
Anthony K May, Aaron P Russell, Stuart A Warmington
PURPOSE: We examined the concurrent characteristics of the remote development of strength and cross-sectional area (CSA) of upper body skeletal muscle in response to lower body resistance training performed with an applied blood flow restriction (BFR). METHODS: Males allocated to an experimental BFR group (EXP; n = 12) or a non-BFR control group (CON; n = 12) completed 7-weeks of resistance training comprising three sets of unilateral bicep curls [50% 1-repetition maximum (1-RM)], then four sets of bilateral knee extension and flexion exercises (30% 1-RM)...
January 19, 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29349721/effects-of-load-on-the-acute-response-of-muscles-proximal-and-distal-to-blood-flow-restriction
#9
Matthew B Jessee, J Grant Mouser, Samuel L Buckner, Scott J Dankel, Kevin T Mattocks, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P Loenneke
To determine the effects of load and blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscular responses, we asked 12 participants to perform chest presses under four different conditions [30/0, 30/40, 50/0, and 50/40, presented as percentage one-repetition maximum (1RM)/percentage arterial occlusion pressure (AOP)]. Muscle thickness increased pre- to post-exercise [chest: mean 0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21, 0.37 cm; triceps: mean 0.44, 95% CI 0.34, 0.54 cm], remaining elevated for 15 min post-exercise. Electromyography amplitude was greater with 50% 1RM and increased over time for the first three repetitions of each set of chest presses...
January 18, 2018: Journal of Physiological Sciences: JPS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29343183/the-acute-angiogenic-signalling-response-to-low-load-resistance-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction
#10
Richard A Ferguson, Julie E A Hunt, Mark P Lewis, Neil R W Martin, Darren J Player, Carolin Stangier, Conor W Taylor, Mark C Turner
This study investigated protein kinase activation and gene expression of angiogenic factors in response to low-load resistance exercise with or without blood flow restriction (BFR). In a repeated measures cross-over design, six males performed four sets of bilateral knee extension exercise at 20% 1RM (reps per set = 30:15:15:continued to fatigue) with BFR (110 mmHg) and without (CON). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis before, 2 and 4 h post-exercise. mRNA expression was determined using real-time RT-PCR...
January 17, 2018: European Journal of Sport Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29317069/blood-flow-restriction-training-as-a-prehabilitation-concept-in-total-knee-arthroplasty-a-narrative-review-about-current-preoperative-interventions-and-the-potential-impact-of-bfr
#11
Alexander Franz, Fina Pauline Queitsch, Michael Behringer, Constantin Mayer, Rüdiger Krauspe, Christoph Zilkens
Osteoarthritis of the knee is one of the most commonly diagnosed joint ailments and responsible for increased rates of total knee arthroplasty surgeries worldwide. Whereas the surgical approach is able to diminish the perceived knee pain of concerned patients', the postoperative recovery is often accompanied by persistent skeletal muscle dysfunctions and atrophy, which is responsible for functional deficits for up to several years. Recent findings indicate that surgery induced adverse effects on skeletal muscles are largely associated with the use of pneumatic tourniquets, wherefore several studies try to reduce tourniquet use in orthopedic surgery...
January 2018: Medical Hypotheses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237062/rumpel-leede-phenomenon-associated-with-blood-flow-restriction-training
#12
Takeshi Kondo
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 11, 2017: QJM: Monthly Journal of the Association of Physicians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29234504/the-effects-of-low-intensity-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-compared-with-conventional-resistance-training-on-the-clinical-outcomes-of-active-uk-military-personnel-following-a-3-week-in-patient-rehabilitation-programme-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-feasibility
#13
Peter Ladlow, Russell J Coppack, Shreshth Dharm-Datta, Dean Conway, Edward Sellon, Stephen D Patterson, Alexander N Bennett
Background: A challenge for rehabilitation practitioners lies in designing optimal exercise programmes that facilitate musculoskeletal (MSK) adaptations whilst simultaneously accommodating biological healing and the safe loading of an injured limb. A growing body of evidence supports the use of resistance training at a reduced load in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) to enhance hypertrophic and strength responses in skeletal muscle. In-patient rehabilitation has a long tradition in the UK Military, however, the efficacy of low intensity (LI) BFR training has not been tested in this rehabilitation setting...
2017: Pilot and Feasibility Studies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29214460/blood-flow-restriction-late-in-recovery-after-heavy-resistance-exercise-hampers-muscle-recuperation
#14
Kestutis Bunevicius, Albinas Grunovas, Tomas Venckunas, Kristina Poderiene, Eugenijus Trinkunas, Jonas Poderys
PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the effect of acute blood flow restriction during the late recovery phase between two resistance exercise bouts on muscular endurance and oxygenation. METHODS: Amateur male middle- and long-distance runners performed two bouts of one-leg dynamic plantar flexion exercise to failure with the load equivalent to 75% of maximum. Subjects were randomly assigned into two experimental groups with thigh occlusion pressure between bouts at either 120 or 200 mmHg with 20 min of passive rest in between, and two control groups without any blood flow restriction separated by either 5 or 20 min of rest...
February 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196847/body-position-influences-arterial-occlusion-pressure-implications-for-the-standardization-of-pressure-during-blood-flow-restricted-exercise
#15
Peter Sieljacks, Louise Knudsen, Mathias Wernbom, Kristian Vissing
PURPOSE: Arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) measured in a supine position is often used to set cuff pressures for blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE). However, supine AOP may not reflect seated or standing AOP, thus potentially influencing the degree of occlusion. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effect of body position on AOP. A secondary aim was to investigate predictors of AOP using wide and narrow cuffs. METHODS: Twenty-four subjects underwent measurements of thigh circumference, skinfold and blood pressure, followed by assessments of thigh AOP in supine and seated positions with a wide and a narrow cuff, respectively, using Doppler ultrasound...
February 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29184265/long-term-low-intensity-endurance-exercise-along-with-blood-flow-restriction-improves-muscle-mass-and-neuromuscular-junction-compartments-in-old-rats
#16
Mohammad-Ali Bahreini Pour, Siyavash Joukar, Fariborz Hovanloo, Hamid Najafipour
Background: During the aging process, muscle atrophy and neuromuscular junction remodeling are inevitable. The present study aimed to clarify whether low-intensity aerobic exercise along with limb blood-flow restriction (BFR) could improve aging-induced muscle atrophy and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Methods: Forty-eight male Wistar rats, aged 23-24 months, were randomly divided into control, sham (Sh: subjected to surgery without BFR), BFR (subjected to BFR), exercise (Ex: subjected to 10 weeks of low-intensity exercise), Sh+Ex, and BFR+Ex groups...
November 2017: Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29121681/concurrent-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-does-not-decrease-inflammatory-markers
#17
Thiago Mattos Frota de Souza, Cleiton Augusto Libardi, Cláudia Regina Cavaglieri, Arthur Fernandes Gáspari, Diego Trevisan Brunelli, Giovana Vergínia de Souza, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Li Min Li, Mara Patricia Traina Chacon-Mikahil
The aging process is associated with several changes in the elderly such as the decrease in cardiorespiratory fitness, strength and muscle mass, in addition to chronic low-grade inflammation. Concurrent training with blood flow restriction can be an interesting alternative to improve functional capacity with low mechanical stress in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to compare the inflammatory effects in older individuals submitted to two different protocols of concurrent training. Twenty-two healthy older adults (63...
January 2018: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29112627/impact-of-blood-flow-restriction-exercise-on-muscle-fatigue-development-and-recovery
#18
Florian Husmann, Thomas Mittlmeier, Sven Bruhn, Volker Zschorlich, Martin Behrens
PURPOSE: The present study was designed to provide mechanistic insight into the time-course and etiology of muscle fatigue development and recovery during and after low-intensity exercise when it is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR). METHODS: Seventeen resistance-trained males completed four sets of low-intensity isotonic resistance exercise under two experimental conditions: knee extension exercise combined with (i) BFR and (ii) without BFR (CON). Neuromuscular tests were performed before, during (immediately after each set of knee extension exercise) and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min after each experimental condition...
November 6, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084094/the-effects-of-practical-blood-flow-restriction-training-on-adolescent-lower-body-strength
#19
Paul E Luebbers, Emily V Witte, Johnathan Q Oshel
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a practical blood flow restriction (BFR) training program on lower-body strength of high school weightlifters. Twenty-five students were divided into three groups. For six weeks, each group completed the same resistance training program with the exception of the parallel back squat exercise (2 days/week), which was different for each group. One group (HI) completed a traditional high load (≥65% 1RM) back squat protocol with three sets of low repetitions (≤10)...
October 27, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084035/risks-of-exertional-rhabdomyolysis-with-blood-flow-restricted-training-beyond-the-case-report
#20
Kyle M A Thompson, Joshua T Slysz, Jamie F Burr
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 26, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
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