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"Blood flow restriction"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29650336/acute-physiological-responses-to-low-intensity-blood-flow-restriction-cycling
#1
H J Thomas, B R Scott, J J Peiffer
OBJECTIVES: Blood flow restriction (BFR) during interval cycling may stimulate aerobic and anaerobic adaptations. However, acute physiological responses to BFR interval cycling have not been extensively investigated. DESIGN: Eighteen males completed low-intensity (LI), low-intensity with BFR (LIBFR ) and high-intensity (HI) interval cycling sessions in randomised and counterbalanced order. These included a standardised warm-up and three two-min intervals interspersed with two-min recovery...
April 9, 2018: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29629973/the-application-of-blood-flow-restriction-lessons-from-the-laboratory
#2
Kevin T Mattocks, Matthew B Jessee, J Grant Mouser, Scott J Dankel, Samuel L Buckner, Zachary W Bell, Johnny G Owens, Takashi Abe, Jeremy P Loenneke
Blood flow restriction by itself or in combination with exercise has been shown to produce beneficial adaptations to skeletal muscle. These adaptations have been observed across a range of populations, and this technique has become an attractive possibility for use in rehabilitation. Although there are concerns that applying blood flow restriction during exercise makes exercise inherently more dangerous, these concerns appear largely unfounded. Nevertheless, we have advocated that practitioners could minimize many of the risks associated with blood flow-restricted exercise by accounting for methodological factors, such as cuff width, cuff type, and the individual to which blood flow restriction is being applied...
April 2018: Current Sports Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29629970/blood-flow-restriction-training-for-postoperative-lower-extremity-weakness-a-report-of-three-cases
#3
David J Tennent, Travis C Burns, Anthony E Johnson, Johnny G Owens, Christina M Hylden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Current Sports Medicine Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29618165/small-arteries-stay-stiff-for-a-longer-period-following-vibration-exercises-in-combination-with-blood-flow-restriction
#4
Ulku Karabulut, Murat Karabulut, Eric G James
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of isometric exercises performed during whole-body vibration (WBV) with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on arterial elasticity and hemodynamic variables. METHODS: Eight male subjects performed static upper body (UB) and lower body (LB) exercises on a vibration platform with and without BFR. During BFR sessions, BFR cuffs were placed on the arms or legs and inflated to a target pressure. Exercises consisted of eight 45-s sets for UB, and ten 1-min sets for LB...
April 4, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29604268/mild-aerobic-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-increases-the-hypertrophy-index-and-musk-in-both-slow-and-fast-muscles-of-old-rats-role-of-pgc-1%C3%AE
#5
Mohammad-Ali Bahreini Pour, Siyavash Joukar, Fariborz Hovanloo, Hamid Najafipour, Vida Naderi, Alireza Raji, Saeed Esmaeili-Mahani
AIMS: Existing evidence emphasize the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in sarcopenia which is revealed as loss of skeletal muscle mass and neuromuscular junction remodeling. We assessed the effect of low-intensity aerobic training along with blood flow restriction on muscle hypertrophy index, muscle-specific kinase (MuSK), a pivotal protein of the neuromuscular junction and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) in aged male rats. MAIN METHODS: Animals groups were control (CTL), sham (Sh), leg blood flow restriction (BFR), exercise (Ex), sham + exercise (Sh + Ex), and BFR plus exercise (BFR + Ex) groups...
March 28, 2018: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29596452/anaerobic-metabolism-induces-greater-total-energy-expenditure-during-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction
#6
Miguel S Conceição, Arthur F Gáspari, Ana P B Ramkrapes, Edson M M Junior, Romulo Bertuzzi, Cláudia R Cavaglieri, Mara Patrícia T Chacon-Mikahil
PURPOSE: We investigated the energy system contributions and total energy expenditure during low intensity endurance exercise associated with blood flow restriction (LIE-BFR) and without blood flow restriction (LIE). METHODS: Twelve males participated in a contra-balanced, cross-over design in which subjects completed a bout of low-intensity endurance exercise (30min cycling at 40% of [Formula: see text]) with or without BFR, separated by at least 72 hours of recovery...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29575714/blood-flow-restricted-exercise-providing-more-bang-for-buck-in-trained-athletes
#7
EDITORIAL
Richard A Ferguson
Blood flow restriction (BFR) has been utilised in physiology for centuries; from William Harvey's (1578-1657) initial use of a tourniquet to describe in detail the systemic circulation of blood, to the use in the last 40 years in the investigation of cardiovascular reflex responses, angiogenesis, skeletal muscle metabolism and fatigue. Recent investigation has largely focussed on the adaptive potential of BFR exercise training, with particular reference to skeletal muscle strength and hypertrophy and its use in the rehabilitation process...
March 25, 2018: Acta Physiologica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29570594/acute-neuromuscular-adaptations-in-response-to-low-intensity-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-and-high-intensity-resistance-exercise-are-there-any-differences
#8
Pedro Fatela, Joana F Reis, Goncalo V Mendonca, Tomás Freitas, Maria J Valamatos, Janne Avela, Pedro Mil-Homens
Fatela, P, Reis, JF, Mendonca, GV, Freitas, T, Valamatos, MJ, Avela, J, and Mil-Homens, P. Acute neuromuscular adaptations in response to low-intensity blood flow restricted exercise and high-intensity resistance exercise: are there any differences? J Strength Cond Res 32(4): 902-910, 2018-Numerous studies have reported similar neuromuscular adaptations between low-intensity (LI) blood-flow restricted exercise (BFRE) and high-intensity (HI) resistance training. Unfortunately, none of these experimental designs individualized blood flow restriction (BFR) levels to each participant...
April 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29570573/sexual-dimorphism-in-the-estimation-of-upper-limb-blood-flow-restriction-in-the-seated-position
#9
Afonso Borges, Carolina Teodósio, Pedro Matos, Pedro Mil-Homens, Pedro Pezarat-Correia, Christopher Fahs, Goncalo V Mendonca
Arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) is typically used to normalize blood flow restriction (BFR) during low intensity BFR exercise. Despite strong evidence for sexual dimorphism in muscle blood flow, sex-related differences in AOP estimation remain a controversial topic. We aimed at determining whether the relationship of upper-limb AOP with arm circumference and systolic blood pressure (BP) differs between men and women resting in the seated position. Sixty-two healthy young participants (31 men: 21.7 ± 2.3; 31 women: 22...
March 22, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29565774/muscle-hypertrophy-following-blood-flow-restricted-low-force-isometric-electrical-stimulation-in-rat-tibialis-anterior-role-for-muscle-hypoxia
#10
Toshiaki Nakajima, Seiichiro Koide, Tomohiro Yasuda, Takaaki Hasegawa, Tatsuya Yamasoba, Syotaro Obi, Shigeru Toyoda, Fumitaka Nakamura, Teruo Inoue, David C Poole, Yutaka Kano
Low force exercise training with blood flow restriction (BFR) elicits muscle hypertrophy. We investigated the effects of microvascular hypoxia (i.e., low microvascular O2 partial pressures, PmvO2 ) during contractions on hypertrophic signaling, growth response and key muscle adaptations for increasing exercise capacity. Wistar rats were fitted with a cuff placed around the upper thigh and inflated to restrict limb blood flow. Low force isometric contractions (30 Hz) were evoked via electrical stimulation of the tibialis anterior (TA) nerve...
March 22, 2018: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29535579/neuromuscular-adaptations-to-low-load-blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training
#11
Summer B Cook, Brendan R Scott, Katherine L Hayes, Bethany G Murphy
Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance exercise has been suggested to be as effective as moderate and high-load resistance training for increasing muscle size and strength. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of 6 weeks of HL or low-load BFR resistance training on neuromuscular function, strength, and hypertrophy of the knee extensors. Eighteen participants aged 18-22 years old were randomized to one of three training groups: moderate load (ML: 70% of 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]); BFR (20% 1-RM with a vascular restriction set to ~180 mmHg); and a control group (CON) that did not exercise...
March 2018: Journal of Sports Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29498531/clinical-translation-of-myocardial-conditioning
#12
Hans Erik Botker, Thomas Ravn Lassen, Nichlas Riise Jespersen
Rapid admission and acute interventional treatment combined with modern antithrombotic pharmacologic therapy have improved outcome in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The next major target to further improve outcome, seems to be ischemia reperfusion injury, which may contribute significantly to the final infarct size and hence mortality and post-infarction heart failure. Mechanical conditioning strategies including local and remote ischemic pre-, per- and postconditioning have demonstrated consistent cardioprotective capacities in experimental models of acute IR injury...
March 2, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29498472/effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-exercises-on-bone-metabolism-a-systematic-review
#13
REVIEW
S T Bittar, P S Pfeiffer, H H Santos, M S Cirilo-Sousa
This study analysed the effect of low-intensity (LI) exercises with blood flow restriction (BFR) on bone metabolism compared with high-intensity (HI) exercises without BFR. The following databases were searched using the keywords therapeutic occlusion training OR BFR training OR vascular occlusion training OR KAATSU training OR ischaemia training AND osteogenesis OR bone biomarkers OR bone metabolic marker OR bone mass OR bone turnover OR osteoporosis OR osteopenia: PubMed, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, Science Direct, Cochrane and Google Scholar...
March 2, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29477554/blood-flow-restriction-training-after-achilles-tendon-rupture
#14
Bobby G Yow, David J Tennent, Thomas C Dowd, Jeremy P Loenneke, Johnny G Owens
Blood flow restriction (BFR) training is a technique shown to be safe and effective at increasing muscular strength and endurance in healthy fitness populations and is under study for its use in postinjury rehabilitation. BFR stimulates muscular strength and hypertrophy gains at much lower loads than traditional methods, allowing patients to begin the rehabilitation process much sooner. We report on 2 patients who incorporated BFR training into their traditional rehabilitation program after Achilles tendon ruptures...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Foot and Ankle Surgery: Official Publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29448855/acute-effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-exercise-induced-free-radical-production-in-young-and-healthy-subjects
#15
Christoph Centner, Denise Zdzieblik, Patrick Dressler, Bruno Fink, Albert Gollhofer, Daniel König
The main purpose of this study was to investigate the acute local and systemic effects of low-load resistance exercise (30% 1RM) with partial vascular occlusion on exercise-induced free radical production and to compare these effects with other established training methods. Fifteen young and healthy males (25 ± 3 years) performed the following four sessions in a counterbalanced order on separate days: low-load resistance exercise (LI: 30% 1RM), low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (LIBR: 30% 1RM), high-load resistance exercise (HI: 80% 1RM) and an additional session without exercise but blood flow restriction only (BR)...
February 16, 2018: Free Radical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446524/impact-of-blood-flow-restricted-bodyweight-exercise-on-skeletal-muscle-adaptations
#16
J E Jakobsgaard, M Christiansen, P Sieljacks, J Wang, T Groennebaek, F de Paoli, K Vissing
This study ascertains the ability of bodyweight blood flow-restricted (BFR) exercise training to promote skeletal muscle adaptations of significance for muscle accretion and metabolism. Six healthy young individuals (three males and three females) performed six weeks of bodyweight BFR training. Each session consisted of five sets of sit-to-stand BFR exercise to volitional failure with 30-second inter-set recovery. Prior to, and at least 72 h after training, muscle biopsies were taken from m. vastus lateralis to assess changes in fibre type-specific cross-sectional area (CSA), satellite cell (SC) and myonuclei content and capillarization, as well as mitochondrial protein expression...
February 15, 2018: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29415981/acute-exertional-compartment-syndrome-with-rhabdomyolysis-case-report-and-review-of-literature
#17
Brandon McKinney, Christopher Gaunder, Ross Schumer
BACKGROUND Acute exertional compartment syndrome (AECS) is a rare cause of leg pain often associated with a delay in diagnosis and potentially leading to irreversible muscle and nerve damage. CASE REPORT We present the case of a previously healthy, high-level athlete who presented with the acute onset of unilateral anterior leg pain and foot drop the day after a strenuous workout. He was diagnosed with compartment syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. His management included emergent fluid resuscitation, fasciotomies, debridement of necrotic muscle from his anterior compartment, and delayed primary closure...
February 8, 2018: American Journal of Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29393688/systematic-review-of-high-level-mobility-training-in-people-with-a-neurological-impairment
#18
Tanja Spencer, Sara Aldous, Gavin Williams, Michael Fahey
AIM: The objective of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of interventions targeting high-level mobility skills in people with a neurological impairment. METHODS: A comprehensive electronic database search was conducted. Study designs were graded using the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) system and methodological quality was described using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. RESULTS: Twelve exploratory studies (AACPDM levels IV/V), of limited methodological quality (PEDro scores of 2-3 out of 10), were included...
2018: Brain Injury: [BI]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29389691/the-effect-of-ischemic-preconditioning-on-maximal-swimming-performance
#19
N Williams, M Russell, C J Cook, L P Kilduff
The effect of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) on swimming performance was examined. Using a randomized, crossover design, National-and International-level swimmers (n=20; 14 males, 6 females) participated in three trials (Con, IPC-2h, IPC-24h). Lower-body IPC (4 x 5 min bi-lateral blood-flow restriction at 160-228 mmHg, and 5 min reperfusion) was used 2- (IPC-2h) or 24-h (IPC-24h) before a self-selected (100 m, n=15; 200 m, n=5) swimming time-trial (TT). The Con trial used a sham intervention (15 mmHg) 2h prior to exercise...
January 30, 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29383885/increased-fxyd1-and-pgc-1%C3%AE-mrna-after-blood-flow-restricted-running-is-related-to-fibre-type-specific-ampk-signalling-and-oxidative-stress-in-human-muscle
#20
Danny Christiansen, Robyn M Murphy, Jens Bangsbo, Christos G Stathis, David J Bishop
AIM: This study explored the effects of blood flow restriction (BFR) on mRNA responses of PGC-1α (total, 1α1, and 1α4) and Na+ ,K+ -ATPase isoforms (NKA; α1-3 , β1-3 , and FXYD1) to an interval running session, and determined if these effects were related to increased oxidative stress, hypoxia, and fibre type-specific AMPK and CaMKII signalling, in human skeletal muscle. METHODS: In a randomised, crossover fashion, eight healthy men (26 ± 5 y and 57.4 ± 6...
January 31, 2018: Acta Physiologica
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