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"Blood flow restriction"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29214460/blood-flow-restriction-late-in-recovery-after-heavy-resistance-exercise-hampers-muscle-recuperation
#1
Kestutis Bunevicius, Albinas Grunovas, Tomas Venckunas, Kristina Poderiene, Eugenijus Trinkunas, Jonas Poderys
PURPOSE: This study aimed to examine the effect of acute blood flow restriction during the late recovery phase between two resistance exercise bouts on muscular endurance and oxygenation. METHODS: Amateur male middle- and long-distance runners performed two bouts of one-leg dynamic plantar flexion exercise to failure with the load equivalent to 75% of maximum. Subjects were randomly assigned into two experimental groups with thigh occlusion pressure between bouts at either 120 or 200 mmHg with 20 min of passive rest in between, and two control groups without any blood flow restriction separated by either 5 or 20 min of rest...
December 6, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29196847/body-position-influences-arterial-occlusion-pressure-implications-for-the-standardization-of-pressure-during-blood-flow-restricted-exercise
#2
Peter Sieljacks, Louise Knudsen, Mathias Wernbom, Kristian Vissing
PURPOSE: Arterial occlusion pressure (AOP) measured in a supine position is often used to set cuff pressures for blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE). However, supine AOP may not reflect seated or standing AOP, thus potentially influencing the degree of occlusion. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the effect of body position on AOP. A secondary aim was to investigate predictors of AOP using wide and narrow cuffs. METHODS: Twenty-four subjects underwent measurements of thigh circumference, skinfold and blood pressure, followed by assessments of thigh AOP in supine and seated positions with a wide and a narrow cuff, respectively, using Doppler ultrasound...
December 1, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29184265/long-term-low-intensity-endurance-exercise-along-with-blood-flow-restriction-improves-muscle-mass-and-neuromuscular-junction-compartments-in-old-rats
#3
Mohammad-Ali Bahreini Pour, Siyavash Joukar, Fariborz Hovanloo, Hamid Najafipour
Background: During the aging process, muscle atrophy and neuromuscular junction remodeling are inevitable. The present study aimed to clarify whether low-intensity aerobic exercise along with limb blood-flow restriction (BFR) could improve aging-induced muscle atrophy and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at the neuromuscular junction. Methods: Forty-eight male Wistar rats, aged 23-24 months, were randomly divided into control, sham (Sh: subjected to surgery without BFR), BFR (subjected to BFR), exercise (Ex: subjected to 10 weeks of low-intensity exercise), Sh+Ex, and BFR+Ex groups...
November 2017: Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29121681/concurrent-training-with-blood-flow-restriction-does-not-decrease-inflammatory-markers
#4
Thiago Mattos Frota de Souza, Cleiton Augusto Libardi, Cláudia Regina Cavaglieri, Arthur Fernandes Gáspari, Diego Trevisan Brunelli, Giovana Vergínia de Souza, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Li Min Li, Mara Patricia Traina Chacon-Mikahil
The aging process is associated with several changes in the elderly such as the decrease in cardiorespiratory fitness, strength and muscle mass, in addition to chronic low-grade inflammation. Concurrent training with blood flow restriction can be an interesting alternative to improve functional capacity with low mechanical stress in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to compare the inflammatory effects in older individuals submitted to two different protocols of concurrent training. Twenty-two healthy older adults (63...
November 9, 2017: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29112627/impact-of-blood-flow-restriction-exercise-on-muscle-fatigue-development-and-recovery
#5
Florian Husmann, Thomas Mittlmeier, Sven Bruhn, Volker Zschorlich, Martin Behrens
PURPOSE: The present study was designed to provide mechanistic insight into the time-course and etiology of muscle fatigue development and recovery during and after low-intensity exercise when it is combined with blood flow restriction (BFR). METHODS: Seventeen resistance-trained males completed four sets of low-intensity isotonic resistance exercise under two experimental conditions: knee extension exercise combined with (i) BFR and (ii) without BFR (CON). Neuromuscular tests were performed before, during (immediately after each set of knee extension exercise) and 1, 2, 4, and 8 min after each experimental condition...
November 6, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084094/the-effects-of-practical-blood-flow-restriction-training-on-adolescent-lower-body-strength
#6
Paul E Luebbers, Emily V Witte, Johnathan Q Oshel
The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a practical blood flow restriction (BFR) training program on lower-body strength of high school weightlifters. Twenty-five students were divided into three groups. For six weeks, each group completed the same resistance training program with the exception of the parallel back squat exercise (2 days/week), which was different for each group. One group (HI) completed a traditional high load (≥65% 1RM) back squat protocol with three sets of low repetitions (≤10)...
October 27, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29084035/risks-of-exertional-rhabdomyolysis-with-blood-flow-restricted-training-beyond-the-case-report
#7
Kyle M A Thompson, Joshua T Slysz, Jamie F Burr
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 26, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29058111/the-effects-of-muscle-blood-flow-restriction-during-running-training-on-measures-of-aerobic-capacity-and-run-time-to-exhaustion
#8
Carl D Paton, Shalako M Addis, Lee-Anne Taylor
PURPOSE: Training with blood flow restriction (BFR) is known to enhance muscle mass and strength during resistance training activities. However, little is known about the BFR effects during aerobic training. This investigation examines the effects of running training performed with or without BFR on physiology and performance. METHOD: Sixteen subjects (age 24.9 ± 6.9 years, height 172.9 ± 7.8 cm, weight 75.1 ± 13.8 kg) were assigned to a BFR or control (CON) group for eight sessions of training...
December 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29049889/early-metabolic-response-after-resistance-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction-in-well-trained-men-a-metabolomics-approach
#9
Denis F Valério, Ricardo Berton, Miguel S Conceição, Rafael R Canevarolo, Mara Patrícia T Chacon-Mikahil, Cláudia R Cavaglieri, Gabriela V Meirelles, Ana C Zeri, Cleiton A Libardi
The present study aimed to compare the early metabolic response between high-load resistance exercise (HL-RE) and low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (LL-BFR). Nine young well-trained men participated in a randomized crossover design in which each subject completed LL-BFR, HL-RE or condition control (no exercise) with a one-week interval between them. Blood samples were taken immediately before and five minutes after the exercise sessions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy identified and quantified 48 metabolites, six of which presented significant changes among the exercise protocols...
October 19, 2017: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29043659/magnitude-of-muscle-strength-and-mass-adaptations-between-high-load-resistance-training-versus-low-load-resistance-training-associated-with-blood-flow-restriction-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#10
REVIEW
Manoel E Lixandrão, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Ricardo Berton, Felipe C Vechin, Miguel S Conceição, Felipe Damas, Cleiton A Libardi, Hamilton Roschel
BACKGROUND: Low-load resistance training (< 50% of one-repetition maximum [1RM]) associated with blood-flow restriction (BFR-RT) has been thought to promote increases in muscle strength and mass. However, it remains unclear if the magnitude of these adaptations is similar to conventional high-load resistance training (> 65% 1RM; HL-RT). OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of HL- versus BFR-RT on muscle adaptations using a systematic review and meta-analysis procedure...
October 17, 2017: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023279/syncope-episodes-and-blood-flow-restriction-training
#11
Juan Martín-Hernández, Alejandro Santos-Lozano, Carl Foster, Alejandro Lucia
The combination of low-load resistance training [or more recently, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES)] with a moderate local blood flow restriction (BFR) is becoming a widespread training and rehabilitation method. Scientific data indicate the overall safety of BFR, at least in healthy young people. However, it has been associated with side effects, usually minor, and further research is warranted regarding the safety and efficacy of this technique, especially in clinical populations. We found 3 syncope/presyncopal episodes among 21 healthy people (9 men), all occurring in men and during familiarization sessions (in which BFR was applied alone) but not thereafter (BFR sessions combined with NMES): 1 subject experienced a brief syncope and 2 other subjects exhibited presyncopal symptoms (sweating, lightheadedness, and pallor)...
October 6, 2017: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28987643/blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training-in-older-adults-at-risk-of-mobility-limitations
#12
Summer B Cook, Dain P LaRoche, Michelle R Villa, Hannah Barile, Todd M Manini
High-load resistance training (HL) may be contraindicated in older adults due to pre-existing health conditions (e.g. osteoarthritis). Low-load blood flow restricted (BFR) resistance training offers an alternative to HL with potentially similar strength improvement. PURPOSE: To compare muscle strength, cross-sectional area (CSA), physical function, and quality of life (QOL) following 12-weeks of HL or BFR training in older adults at risk of mobility limitations. METHODS: Thirty-six males and females (mean: 75...
December 1, 2017: Experimental Gerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28986234/effects-of-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-training-on-muscular-strength-and-blood-flow-in-older-adults
#13
Jahyun Kim, James A Lang, Neha Pilania, Warren D Franke
BACKGROUND: In young adults, blood flow restricted exercise (BFRE) at relatively low intensities can increase muscle strength as effectively as conventional high intensity training. Ischemic exercise can also increase collateral blood flow in skeletal muscle. However, the effects of chronic BFRE on muscle strength and blood flow in older adults remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 4weeks of BFRE training on skeletal muscle strength and blood flow between young and older subjects and between older adults performing BFRE and conventional high intensity resistance exercise...
December 1, 2017: Experimental Gerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28966705/blood-flow-restriction-training-implementation-into-clinical-practice
#14
EDITORIAL
William R Vanwye, Alyssa M Weatherholt, Alan E Mikesky
To improve muscular strength and hypertrophy the American College of Sports Medicine recommends moderate to high load resistance training. However, use of moderate to high loads are often not feasible in clinical populations. Therefore, the emergence of low load (LL) blood flow restriction (BFR) training as a rehabilitation tool for clinical populations is becoming popular. Although the majority of research on LL-BFR training has examined healthy populations, clinical applications are emerging. Overall, it appears BFR training is a safe and effective tool for rehabilitation...
2017: International Journal of Exercise Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965344/time-course-change-in-muscle-swelling-high-intensity-vs-blood-flow-restriction-exercise
#15
Eduardo D S Freitas, Christopher Poole, Ryan M Miller, Aaron David Heishman, Japneet Kaur, Debra A Bemben, Michael Bemben
This study determined the time course for changes in muscle swelling and plasma volume following high (HI) and low-intensity resistance exercise with blood-flow restriction (LI-BFR). Ten male participants (22.1±3.0 yrs) completed three experimental conditions: high-intensity exercise (HI - 80% of 1RM), low-intensity exercise with BFR (LI-BFR -20% of 1RM, and 160 mmHg of BFR), and control (CON - no exercise or BFR). Muscle cross-sectional area (mCSA), muscle thickness, thigh circumference, and percentage change in plasma volume (PV%∆) were measured...
October 1, 2017: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28956640/are-higher-blood-flow-restriction-pressures-more-beneficial-when-lower-loads-are-used
#16
S J Dankel, M B Jessee, S L Buckner, J G Mouser, K T Mattocks, J P Loenneke
The application of blood flow restriction during low-load resistance exercise has been shown to induce muscle growth with high or low restriction pressures, however, loads lower than 20% one-repetition maximum (1RM) remain unexplored. Fourteen trained individuals completed six elbow flexion protocols involving three different loads (10%, 15%, and 20% 1RM) each of which was performed with either a low (40% arterial occlusion) or high (80% arterial occlusion) pressure. Pre- and post-measurements of surface electromyography (sEMG), isometric torque, and muscle thickness were analyzed...
September 1, 2017: Physiology International
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28950398/cardiovascular-responses-to-different-resistance-exercise-protocols-in-elderly
#17
Amanda Veiga Sardeli, Lucas do Carmo Santos, Marina Lívia Venturini Ferreira, Arthur Fernades Gáspari, Bruno Rodrigues, Cláudia Regina Cavaglieri, Mara Patricia Traina Chacon-Mikahil
Increase in muscle mass and strength through resistance exercise (RE) has been highly recommended for healthy aging. On the other hand, RE could lead to acute cardiovascular risks prompted mainly by intense blood pressure elevations and cardiac autonomic imbalance. We compared the cardiovascular responses to three different RE protocols performed by 21 healthy elderly on a leg press machine. The protocols tested were high load (80% 1RM) until muscular failure (HL); low load (30% 1RM) until muscular failure (LL); low load, 30 repetitions followed by 3 sets of 15 repetitions, with 50% blood flow restriction (LL-BFR); and a control session (CON)...
November 2017: International Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28949007/can-low-load-blood-flow-restriction-training-elicit-muscle-hypertrophy-with-modest-inflammation-and-cellular-stress-but-minimal-muscle-damage
#18
Giselle L Allsopp, Anthony K May
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28946817/fetal-growth-restriction-induced-by-transient-uterine-ischemia-reperfusion-differential-responses-in-different-mouse-strains
#19
Larry G Thaete, Xiao-Wu Qu, Mark G Neerhof, Emmet Hirsch, Tamas Jilling
We characterized fetal and placental growth and uterine and placental inflammation in pregnant C3H/HeOuJ and C57BL/6J mice (strains with different sensitivities to metabolic and circulatory pathologies), using different uterine ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) protocols, to establish and refine a murine model of I/R-induced fetal growth restriction (FGR). Pregnant C3H/HeOuJ mice on gestation day 15 were subjected to unilateral uterine I/R by (1) total blood flow restriction (TFR) by occlusion of the right ovarian and uterine arteries for 30 minutes, (2) partial flow restriction (PFR) by occlusion of only the right ovarian artery for 30 minutes, or (3) sham surgery...
January 1, 2017: Reproductive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28932500/effects-of-low-load-resistance-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction-on-high-energy-phosphate-metabolism-and-oxygenation-level-in-skeletal-muscle
#20
Osamu Yanagisawa, Manabu Sanomura
We aimed to evaluate the effects of low-load resistance exercise with blood flow restriction (BFR) on high-energy phosphate metabolism, intracellular pH, and oxygenation level in the skeletal muscle. Seven males performed low-load ankle plantar flexion exercise (120 repetitions, 30% of one-repetition maximum) with and without BFR (130% of systolic blood pressure) inside a magnetic resonance device. Inorganic phosphate (Pi)-to-phosphocreatine (PCr) ratio, intracellular pH, and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) in the medial gastrocnemius were determined using (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy before and during exercise...
June 2017: Interventional Medicine & Applied Science
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