keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

"Blood flow restriction"

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324168/the-effect-of-eccentric-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction-on-neuromuscular-activation-microvascular-oxygenation-and-the-repeated-bout-effect
#1
Jakob D Lauver, Trent E Cayot, Timothy Rotarius, Barry W Scheuermann
PURPOSE: To examine the effect of low-intensity eccentric contractions with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on microvascular oxygenation, neuromuscular activation, and the repeated bout effect (RBE). METHODS: Participants were randomly assigned to either low-intensity (LI), low-intensity with BFR (LI-BFR), or a control (CON) group. Participants in LI and LI-BFR performed a preconditioning bout of low-intensity eccentric exercise prior to about of maximal eccentric exercise...
March 21, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259850/blood-flow-restriction-training-in-clinical-musculoskeletal-rehabilitation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#2
REVIEW
Luke Hughes, Bruce Paton, Ben Rosenblatt, Conor Gissane, Stephen David Patterson
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Low-load exercise training with blood flow restriction (BFR) can increase muscle strength and may offer an effective clinical musculoskeletal (MSK) rehabilitation tool. The aim of this review was to systematically analyse the evidence regarding the effectiveness of this novel training modality in clinical MSK rehabilitation. DESIGN: This is a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed literature examining BFR training in clinical MSK rehabilitation (Research Registry; researchregistry91)...
March 4, 2017: British Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28251784/the-acute-muscular-response-to-blood-flow-restricted-exercise-with-very-low-relative-pressure
#3
Matthew B Jessee, Kevin T Mattocks, Samuel L Buckner, J Grant Mouser, Brittany R Counts, Scott J Dankel, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
To investigate the acute responses to blood flow-restricted (BFR) exercise across low, moderate and high relative pressures. Muscle thickness, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and electromyography (EMG) amplitude were assessed following exercise with six different BFR pressures: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50% and 90% of arterial occlusion pressure (AOP). There were differences between each time point within each condition for muscle thickness, which increased postexercise [+0·47 (0·40, 0·54) cm] and then trended towards baseline...
March 2, 2017: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28240297/abnormal-capillary-vasodynamics-contribute-to-ictal-neurodegeneration-in-epilepsy
#4
Rocio Leal-Campanario, Luis Alarcon-Martinez, Hector Rieiro, Susana Martinez-Conde, Tugba Alarcon-Martinez, Xiuli Zhao, Jonathan LaMee, Pamela J Osborn Popp, Michael E Calhoun, Juan I Arribas, Alexander A Schlegel, Leandro L Di Stasi, Jong M Rho, Landon Inge, Jorge Otero-Millan, David M Treiman, Stephen L Macknik
Seizure-driven brain damage in epilepsy accumulates over time, especially in the hippocampus, which can lead to sclerosis, cognitive decline, and death. Excitotoxicity is the prevalent model to explain ictal neurodegeneration. Current labeling technologies cannot distinguish between excitotoxicity and hypoxia, however, because they share common molecular mechanisms. This leaves open the possibility that undetected ischemic hypoxia, due to ictal blood flow restriction, could contribute to neurodegeneration previously ascribed to excitotoxicity...
February 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28224640/low-load-resistance-training-with-low-relative-pressure-produces-muscular-changes-similar-to-high-load-resistance-training
#5
Daeyeol Kim, Jeremy P Loenneke, Xin Ye, Debra A Bemben, Travis W Beck, Rebecca D Larson, Michael G Bemben
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare the acute and chronic response of high-load (HL) resistance training to low-load resistance training with a low blood flow restriction (LL-BFR) pressure. METHODS: Participants completed elbow flexion with either HL or LL-BFR, or non-exercise (CON). In the chronic study, participants in the HL and LL-BFR were trained for 8 weeks to determine differences in muscle size and strength. The acute study examined the changes in Pre/Post torque, muscle swelling, and blood lactate...
February 22, 2017: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214295/blood-flow-restriction-increases-metabolic-stress-but-decreases-muscle-activation-during-high-load-resistance-exercise
#6
Emerson L Teixeira, Renato Barroso, Carla Silva-Batista, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke, Hamilton Roschel, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Valmor Tricoli
INTRODUCTION: We investigated differences in metabolic stress (lactate) and muscle activation (electromyography; EMG) when high-load resistance exercise (HL) is compared with a condition in which blood flow restriction (BFR) is applied during the exercise or during the rest interval. METHODS: Twelve participants performed HL with BFR during the intervals (BFR-I), during the set (BFR-S), and without BFR. Each condition consisted of 3 sets of 8 repetitions with knee extension at 70% of 1-repetition maximum...
February 18, 2017: Muscle & Nerve
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183863/hemodynamic-responses-are-reduced-with-aerobic-compared-with-resistance-blood-flow-restriction-exercise
#7
Anthony K May, Christopher R Brandner, Stuart A Warmington
The hemodynamics of light-load exercise with an applied blood-flow restriction (BFR) have not been extensively compared between light-intensity, BFR, and high-intensity forms of both resistance and aerobic exercise in the same participant population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use a randomized crossover design to examine the hemodynamic responses to resistance and aerobic BFR exercise in comparison with a common high-intensity and light-intensity non-BFR exercise. On separate occasions participants completed a leg-press (resistance) or treadmill (aerobic) trial...
February 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174436/cardiovascular-response-to-bouts-of-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction
#8
Kestutis Bunevicius, Arturas Sujeta, Kristina Poderiene, Birute Zachariene, Viktoras Silinskas, Rimantas Minkevicius, Jonas Poderys
[Purpose] Occlusion training with low-intensity resistance exercises and blood flow restriction increases muscle cross-sectional area and strength. This form of training is used in rehabilitation; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of one occlusion training session on the cardiovascular response to bouts of exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Two groups took part: a control group without blood flow restriction and an experimental group with blood flow restriction. A single training session was used with the exercise intensity set at 40% of the one repetition maximum...
December 2016: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28144415/acute-cardiovascular-and-hemodynamic-responses-to-low-intensity-eccentric-resistance-exercise-with-blood-flow-restriction
#9
Behzad Bazgir, Mojtaba Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Hamid Rajabi, Rouhollah Fathi, Seyed Mojtaba Ojaghi, Mohammad Kazem Emami Meybodi, Gabriel R Neto, Mostafa Rahimi, Alireza Asgari
BACKGROUND: Recently it has been suggested that low intensity (LI) resistance exercise (RE) alone or in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) can be applied for cardiovascular function improvement or rehabilitation. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to investigate the acute effects of LI eccentric RE with and without BFR on heart rate (HR), rate pressure product (RPP), blood pressure (BP) parameters [systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure (MAP)], oxygen saturation (SpO2) and rate of perceived exertion (RPE)...
December 2016: Asian Journal of Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143367/does-a-resistance-exercise-session-with-continuous-or-intermittent-blood-flow-restriction-promote-muscle-damage-and-increase-oxidative-stress
#10
Gabriel R Neto, Jefferson S Novaes, Verônica P Salerno, Michel M Gonçalves, Gilmário R Batista, Maria S Cirilo-Sousa
The aim of this study was to compare the effect of low-load resistance exercise (LLRE) with continuous and intermittent blood flow restriction (BFR) on the creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein carbonyl (PC), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) and uric acid (UA) levels in military men. The study included 10 recreationally trained men aged 19 ± 0.82 years who underwent the following experimental protocols in random order on separate days (72-96 h): 4 LLRE sessions at a 20% 1RM (one-repetition maximum [1RM]) with continuous BFR (LLRE + CBFR); 4 LLRE sessions at 20% 1RM with intermittent BFR (LLRE + IBFR) and 4 high-intensity resistance exercise (HIRE) sessions at 80% 1RM...
January 31, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143359/the-role-of-blood-flow-restriction-training-for-applied-practitioners-a-questionnaire-based-survey
#11
Stephen D Patterson, Christopher R Brandner
The purpose of the study was to investigate the current use of blood flow restriction (BFR) by practitioners during exercise/training. A questionnaire was developed and data were obtained from 250 participants, with 115 stating that they had prescribed BFR as an intervention. The most common exercise intervention used in combination with BFR was resistance exercise (99/115), followed by during passive (30/115) conditions, and during aerobic exercise (22/115). The main outcome measure for using the technique was to increase muscle mass (32...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28131507/the-influence-of-time-on-determining-blood-flow-restriction-pressure
#12
James W Ingram, Scott J Dankel, Samuel L Buckner, Brittany R Counts, J Grant Mouser, Takashi Abe, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
The influence of time, manifested in the oscillatory nature of physiology, has been documented in many processes. Within blood flow restriction literature, the restrictive stimulus is often applied based on a single arterial occlusion measurement, which is closely related to brachial systolic blood pressure (bSBP). Considering the oscillatory nature of bSBP, it is likely that time also influences arterial occlusion measurements. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the influence of time, within and between days, on arterial occlusion pressure and to determine whether the variability resembles the oscillatory pattern of bSBP...
January 24, 2017: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28127587/corticospinal-excitability-changes-following-blood-flow-restriction-training-of-the-tibialis-anterior-a-preliminary-study
#13
Erhard Trillingsgaard Næss-Schmidt, Morten Morthorst, Asger Roer Pedersen, Jørgen Feldbæk Nielsen, Peter William Stubbs
AIM: To examine the neural excitability of projections to the tibialis anterior (TA) following blood flow restriction training (BFRT). This is the first study to examine the TA following BFRT. METHODS: Ten subjects performed each experiment. Experiment one consisted of BFRT at 130 mmHg (BFRT-low). Experiment two consisted of BFRT at 200 mmHg (BFRT-high), training (TR-only) and blood flow restriction at 200 mmHg (BFR-only) performed on separate days. Blood flow restriction was applied to the thigh and training consisted of rapid dorsiflexion contractions against gravity every 10 s for 15-min...
January 2017: Heliyon
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124127/acute-low-intensity-cycling-with-blood-flow-restriction-has-no-effect-on-metabolic-signaling-in-human-skeletal-muscle-compared-to-traditional-exercise
#14
William J Smiles, Miguel S Conceição, Guilherme D Telles, Mara P T Chacon-Mikahil, Cláudia R Cavaglieri, Felipe C Vechin, Cleiton A Libardi, John A Hawley, Donny M Camera
PURPOSE: Autophagy is an intracellular degradative system sensitive to hypoxia and exercise-induced perturbations to cellular bioenergetics. We determined the effects of low-intensity endurance-based exercise performed with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on cell signaling adaptive responses regulating autophagy and substrate metabolism in human skeletal muscle. METHODS: In a randomized cross-over design, nine young, healthy but physically inactive males completed three experimental trials separated by 1 week of recovery consisting of either a resistance exercise bout (REX: 4 × 10 leg press repetitions, 70% 1-RM), endurance exercise (END: 30 min cycling, 70% VO2peak), or low-intensity cycling with BFR (15 min, 40% VO2peak)...
January 25, 2017: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28121802/delayed-effect-of-blood-flow-restricted-resistance-training-on-rapid-force-capacity
#15
Jakob Lindberg Nielsen, Ulrik Frandsen, Tatyana Prokhorova, Rune Dueholm Bech, Tobias Nygaard, Charlotte Suetta, Per Aagaard
PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and time course of high-frequent low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction (BFR) on rapid force capacity (i.e. rate of torque development (RTD)). METHODS: Ten male subjects (22.8±2.3 years) performed four sets of knee extensor exercise (20%1RM) to concentric failure during concurrent BFR of the thigh (100mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 years) trained without BFR (CON)...
January 23, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28118308/delayed-onset-muscle-soreness-and-perceived-exertion-following-blood-flow-restriction-exercise
#16
Christopher R Brandner, Stuart A Warmington
The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptual responses to resistance exercise with either heavy-loads (80% 1 repetition maximum [1-RM]), light-loads (20% 1-RM), or light-loads in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR). Despite the use of light-loads, it has been suggested that the adoption of BFR resistance exercise may be limited due to increases in delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and perceived exertion. Seventeen healthy untrained males participated in this balanced, randomized cross-over study...
January 11, 2017: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28093857/can-blood-flow-restriction-augment-muscle-activation-during-high-load-training
#17
Scott J Dankel, Samuel L Buckner, Matthew B Jessee, Kevin T Mattocks, J Grant Mouser, Brittany R Counts, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
INTRODUCTION: Blood flow restriction has been shown to augment muscle activation and increase muscle size when combined with low-load training; however, much less is known on whether blood flow restriction can augment muscle activation during high-load exercise. PURPOSE: To determine whether applying blood flow restriction can augment muscle activation with traditional high-load resistance exercise. METHOD: Ten individuals completed two sets of elbow flexion exercise to volitional fatigue...
January 16, 2017: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088558/the-effects-of-upper-body-exercise-across-different-levels-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-arterial-occlusion-pressure-and-perceptual-responses
#18
Kevin T Mattocks, Matthew B Jessee, Brittany R Counts, Samuel L Buckner, J Grant Mouser, Scott J Dankel, Gilberto C Laurentino, Jeremy P Loenneke
Recent studies have investigated relative pressures that are applied during blood flow restriction exercise ranging from 40%-90% of resting arterial occlusion pressure; however, no studies have investigated relative pressures below 40% arterial occlusion pressure. The purpose of this study was to characterize the cardiovascular and perceptual responses to different levels of pressures. Twenty-six resistance trained participants performed four sets of unilateral elbow flexion exercise using 30% of their 1RM in combination with blood flow restriction inflated to one of six relative applied pressures (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 50%, 90% arterial occlusion pressure)...
January 11, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28029066/cardiac-autonomic-and-haemodynamic-recovery-after-a-single-session-of-aerobic-exercise-with-and-without-blood-flow-restriction-in-older-adults
#19
Marina Lívia Venturini Ferreira, Amanda Veiga Sardeli, Giovana Vergínia De Souza, Valéria Bonganha, Lucas Do Carmo Santos, Alex Castro, Cláudia Regina Cavaglieri, Mara Patrícia Traina Chacon-Mikahil
This study investigated the autonomic and haemodynamic responses to different aerobic exercise loads, with and without blood flow restriction (BFR). In a crossover study, 21 older adults (8 males and 13 females) completed different aerobic exercise sessions: low load without BFR (LL) (40% VO2max), low load with BFR (LL-BFR) (40% VO2max + 50% BFR) and high load without BFR (HL) (70% VO2max). Heart rate variability and haemodynamic responses were recorded during rest and throughout 30 min of recovery. HL reduced R-R interval, the root mean square of successive difference of R-R intervals and high frequency during 30 min of recovery at a greater magnitude compared with LL and LL-BFR...
December 28, 2016: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28002685/effects-of-blood-flow-restriction-on-biomarkers-of-myogenesis-in-response-to-resistance-exercise
#20
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Andrew S Layne, Kelly Larkin-Kaiser, R Gavin MacNeil, Marvin Dirain, Bhanuprasad Sandesara, Todd M Manini, Thomas W Buford
We investigated the acute myogenic response to resistance exercise with and without blood-flow restriction (BFR). Six men and women (age, 22 ± 1 years) performed unilateral knee extensions at 40% of 1-repetition maximum with or without (CNTRL) BFR applied via pressure cuff inflated to 220 mm Hg. Muscle biopsies were collected at 4 h and 24 h postexercise. Addition of BFR increased myoD and c-Met messenger RNA expression relative to CNTRL. Expression of hepatocyte growth factor protein was significantly higher following CNTRL...
January 2017: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
keyword
keyword
107873
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"