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Quercetin for chronic pelvic pain

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/26313612/chronic-bacterial-prostatitis-and-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#1
Diana K Bowen, Elodi Dielubanza, Anthony J Schaeffer
INTRODUCTION: Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and can occur either with an active infection (chronic bacterial prostatitis [CBP]) or with only pain and no evidence of bacterial causation (chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CPPS]). Bacterial prostatitis is characterised by recurrent urinary tract infections or infection in the prostate with the same bacterial strain, which often results from urinary tract instrumentation. However, the cause and natural history of CPPS are unknown and not associated with active infection...
2015: Clinical Evidence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21798389/quercetin-for-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#2
Daniel A Shoskes, J Curtis Nickel
Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common condition with a heterogeneous origin that responds best to multimodal therapy. The bioflavonoid quercetin has antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects that have proven useful for treating this condition. Using the clinical phenotype system UPOINT, quercetin can be helpful for those with organ-specific complaints (bladder or prostate) and pelvic floor spasm. This article discusses the current understanding of CP/CPPS and how treatment with quercetin can be used alone or as part of multimodal therapy...
August 2011: Urologic Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21736764/chronic-prostatitis
#3
REVIEW
Brian Le, Anthony J Schaeffer
INTRODUCTION: Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review)...
2011: Clinical Evidence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20363491/phenotypically-directed-multimodal-therapy-for-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome-a-prospective-study-using-upoint
#4
Daniel A Shoskes, J Curtis Nickel, Michael W Kattan
OBJECTIVES: Large, controlled trials in chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) have failed due to patient heterogeneity. To phenotype CPPS patients, we developed the UPOINT system with 6 domains (Urinary, Psychosocial, Organ-Specific, Infection, Neurologic/Systemic and Tenderness). In this study, we treated patients with multimodal therapy based on the UPOINT phenotype and measured response after at least 6 months. METHODS: Patients with CPPS were offered multimodal therapy based on the UPOINT phenotype (eg, Urinary: alpha blocker or antimuscarinic; Organ-specific: quercetin; Tenderness: physical therapy)...
June 2010: Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19450305/chronic-prostatitis
#5
REVIEW
Bradley A Erickson, Anthony J Schaeffer, Brian Van Le
INTRODUCTION: Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. METHODS AND OUTCOMES: We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review)...
2008: Clinical Evidence
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19192937/chronic-prostatitis-management-strategies
#6
REVIEW
Adam B Murphy, Amanda Macejko, Aisha Taylor, Robert B Nadler
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has redefined prostatitis into four distinct entities. Category I is acute bacterial prostatitis. It is an acute prostatic infection with a uropathogen, often with systemic symptoms of fever, chills and hypotension. The treatment hinges on antimicrobials and drainage of the bladder because the inflamed prostate may block urinary flow. Category II prostatitis is called chronic bacterial prostatitis. It is characterized by recurrent episodes of documented urinary tract infections with the same uropathogen and causes pelvic pain, urinary symptoms and ejaculatory pain...
2009: Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19006474/interstitial-cystitis-bladder-pain-and-beyond
#7
REVIEW
Theoharis C Theoharides, Kristine Whitmore, Edward Stanford, Robert Moldwin, Michael P O'Leary
BACKGROUND: Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of a urinary tract infection. Interstitial cystitis occurs primarily in females including adolescents and its diagnosis is still one of exclusion. It is now recognized as a serious medical condition associated with significant disability. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to review the pathogenesis and treatment of interstitial cystitis with emphasis on new pathogenetic trends and therapeutic modalities...
December 2008: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/18519016/new-therapies-in-chronic-prostatitis
#8
REVIEW
Nivedita Bhatta Dhar, Daniel A Shoskes
The optimal management of category III prostatitis (chronic pelvic pain syndrome) is not known. Conventional therapy usually consists of prolonged courses of antibiotics; however, clinical trials have never shown their efficacy. Newer therapies with some evidence for efficacy include alpha-blockers, anti-inflammatory phytotherapy (quercetin, bee pollen), physiotherapy, neuroleptics, and others with unique actions such as antinanobacterial treatment. A stepwise approach involving multiple treatment modalities is often successful for patients with this common and frustrating condition...
July 2007: Current Urology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/18472971/current-treatment-options-in-the-management-of-chronic-prostatitis
#9
Alain Jean Duclos, Chun-Te Lee, Daniel Arthur Shoskes
Chronic prostatitis is a disease with an unknown etiology that affects a large number of men. The optimal management for category III chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is unknown. The recent years have seen a significant increase in research efforts to understand, classify and treat CP/CPPS. Standard treatment usually consists of prolonged courses of antibiotics, even though well-designed clinical trials have failed to demonstrate their efficacy. Recent treatment strategies with some evidence of efficacy include: alpha-blockers, anti-inflammatory agents, hormonal manipulation, phytotherapy (quercetin, bee pollen), physiotherapy and chronic pain therapy...
August 2007: Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17954024/treatment-of-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#10
J Curtis Nickel
Acceptance of the National Institutes of Health definition of Category III Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) and the development and validation of the Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index has stimulated significant research into treatment of this condition. Evidence-based suggestions for treatment include the following. (i) Antimicrobials cannot be recommended for men with longstanding, previously treated CP/CPPS. (ii) Alpha-blockers can be recommended as first-line medical therapy, particularly in alpha-blocker-naïve men with moderately severe symptoms who have relatively recent onset of symptoms...
February 2008: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/16930503/the-management-of-chronic-prostatitis-in-men-with-hiv
#11
REVIEW
Vincent M Santillo, Franklin C Lowe
Prostatitis is a common urologic diagnosis. Although treatment algorithms are available for this poorly understood entity, several adaptations must be made in order to accommodate the therapeutic needs of HIV-positive patients. The most important consideration when treating HIV-infected patients for prostatitis is their current immune status, whether they are immunocompromised or not (non-progressive disease or reconstituted with highly active antiretroviral therapy). A treatment algorithm for those with chronic bacterial prostatitis (Category II), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (Category IIIA), and prostatodynia (Category IIIB) is presented in this article...
July 2006: Current Urology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/16322807/complementary-and-alternative-medicine-for-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#12
Jillian L Capodice, Debra L Bemis, Ralph Buttyan, Steven A Kaplan, Aaron E Katz
To discuss challenges concerning treatment for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and review complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapies being evaluated for this condition, we performed a comprehensive search of articles published from 1990-2005 using the PubMed, Medline databases. Data from the articles were abstracted and pooled by subject. Keywords cross-searched with CP/CPPS included: complementary, alternative, integrative, therapies, interventions, nutrition, antioxidants, herbs, supplements, biofeedback and acupuncture...
December 2005: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/12629373/long-term-results-of-multimodal-therapy-for-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome
#13
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Daniel A Shoskes, Lawrence Hakim, Gamal Ghoniem, Charles L Jackson
PURPOSE: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a prevalent and multifactorial condition. Many patients have the condition for years despite conventional therapies. We assess the outcomes of multimodal therapy in patients with long-standing chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 53 patients with chronic prostatitis treated at our clinic with a minimum followup of 6 months were assessed by the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and by a global assessment score...
April 2003: Journal of Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/12195565/chronic-prostatitis-and-chronic-pelvic-pain-in-men-aetiology-diagnosis-and-management
#14
REVIEW
G A Luzzi
Patients with chronic prostatitis/pelvic pain syndrome typically report genital or pelvic pain (in or around the penis, perineum, scrotum) lasting > 3 months. Whereas true chronic bacterial prostatitis is an uncommon condition characterised by recurrent prostatic and urinary infection, chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) is a common condition in which no infection is found. Recent surveys suggest a prevalence of 2.5-3% for CPPS. The four-glass test, traditionally used to distinguish inflammatory and inflammatory forms of CPPS, has not been adequately validated; whether the distinction is clinically meaningful is increasingly questioned...
May 2002: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/12149166/phytotherapy-and-other-alternative-forms-of-care-for-the-patient-with-prostatitis
#15
Daniel A Shoskes
Chronic prostatitis is a very common and poorly understood condition with significant impact on quality of life. Given the lack of proven efficacy of conventional therapies such as antibiotics, it is not surprising that patients have turned with increasing frequency to phytotherapy and other alternative treatments. Although alternative therapies are plentiful, few have been subjected to scientific scrutiny and prospective controlled clinical trials. This review discusses therapies commonly used by patients with prostatitis and focuses in detail on those with published data...
August 2002: Current Urology Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/12050565/cytokine-polymorphisms-in-men-with-chronic-prostatitis-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome-association-with-diagnosis-and-treatment-response
#16
Daniel A Shoskes, Qussay Albakri, Kim Thomas, Daniel Cook
PURPOSE: The chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a common disorder of unknown etiology. Elevated cytokines in prostate fluid and semen are frequent findings. We studied genetic polymorphisms that can alter cytokine gene expression in men with the chronic pelvic pain syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was extracted from blood from 36 men with the chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Reversed sequence specific oligonucleotide probing was used to genotype the polymorphisms for cytokine promoter sites, namely tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha 308, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 25, TGF-beta 10, interleukin (IL)-10 1082 and IL-6 174...
July 2002: Journal of Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/11272677/treatment-of-interstitial-cystitis-with-a-quercetin-supplement
#17
F Katske, D A Shoskes, M Sender, R Poliakin, K Gagliano, J Rajfer
PURPOSE: Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a disorder of unknown etiology with few effective therapies. Oral bioflavonoid therapy utilizing quercetin recently proved to be clinically effective in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome, a disorder with similarities to IC. We therefore tested in an open-label trial a quercetin-based supplement in patients with clinically proven IC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-two patients (5 men and 17 women; average age 53.1 years) with classically documented IC received one capsule of Cysta-Q complex (equivalent to 500 mg of quercetin) twice a day for 4 weeks...
March 2001: Techniques in Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/10975414/oxidative-stress-in-prostatic-fluid-of-patients-with-chronic-pelvic-pain-syndrome-correlation-with-gram-positive-bacterial-growth-and-treatment-response
#18
A R Shahed, D A Shoskes
The etiology of chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS)/chronic prostatitis category III remains unknown. Whereas a subset of men respond to antimicrobial therapy, gram positive bacteria isolated from expressed prostatic secretions (EPS) are often considered to be commensal rather than pathogenic. We wished to study oxidative stress as a marker of tissue injury and response in EPS of men with CPPS to determine whether infection with gram positive bacteria is associated with increased oxidative stress. A total of 300 EPS specimens from 100 men with CPPS were collected for microscopy, culture, and biochemical and molecular assays...
September 2000: Journal of Andrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/10604689/quercetin-in-men-with-category-iii-chronic-prostatitis-a-preliminary-prospective-double-blind-placebo-controlled-trial
#19
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
D A Shoskes, S I Zeitlin, A Shahed, J Rajfer
OBJECTIVES: The National Institutes of Health (NIH) category III chronic prostatitis syndromes (nonbacterial chronic prostatitis and prostatodynia) are common disorders with few effective therapies. Bioflavonoids have recently been shown in an open-label study to improve the symptoms of these disorders in a significant proportion of men. The aim of this study was to confirm these findings in a prospective randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Thirty men with category IIIa and IIIb chronic pelvic pain syndrome were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive either placebo or the bioflavonoid quercetin 500 mg twice daily for 1 month...
December 1999: Urology
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