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Xenon neuroprotection

Xiangyun Yin, Jixiu Zhao, Hong Jiang, Liangliang Li, Jian Jiang, Hongmin Xi, Xiangli Peng, Xiaohang Yin, Xiaotong Shi, Lulu Zhang
BACKGROUND: Premature birth is a significant health care burden. Xenon (Xe) is a general anesthetic with neuroprotective effects. OBJECTIVES: Here, we investigate the neuroprotective role of Xe in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-induced white matter damage (WMD) model. METHODS: Three-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a sham group (group A, n = 24), an LPS + HI group (group B, n = 24), and an LPS + HI + Xe group (group C, n = 72)...
March 8, 2018: Neonatology
Zhu-Wei Zhang, Dong-Ping Zhang, Hai-Ying Li, Zhong Wang, Gang Chen
Stroke that is caused by poor blood flow into the brain results in cell death, including ischemia stroke due to lack of blood into brain tissue, and hemorrhage due to bleeding. Both of them will give rise to the dysfunction of brain. In general, the signs and symptoms of stroke are the inability of feeling or moving on one side of body, sometimes loss of vision to one side. Above symptoms will appear soon after the stroke has happened. If the symptoms and signs happen in 1 or 2 hours, we often call them as transient ischemic attack...
October 2017: Medical Gas Research
A J Gardner, D K Menon
Despite the global burden of brain injury, neuroprotective agents remain elusive. There are no clinically effective therapies which reduce mortality or improve long-term cognitive outcome. Ventilation could be an easily modifiable variable in resuscitation; gases are relatively simple to administer. Xenon is the prototypic agent of a new generation of experimental treatments which show promise. However, use is hindered by its prohibitive cost and anaesthetic properties. Argon is an attractive option, being cheaper, easy to transport, non-sedating, and mechanistically distinct from xenon...
March 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
M Coburn, R D Sanders, M Maze, M-L Nguyên-Pascal, S Rex, B Garrigues, J A Carbonell, M L Garcia-Perez, A Stevanovic, P Kienbaum, M Neukirchen, M S Schaefer, B Borghi, H van Oven, A Tognù, L Al Tmimi, L Eyrolle, O Langeron, X Capdevila, G M Arnold, M Schaller, R Rossaint
BACKGROUND: Postoperative delirium occurs frequently in elderly hip fracture surgery patients and is associated with poorer overall outcomes. Because xenon anaesthesia has neuroprotective properties, we evaluated its effect on the incidence of delirium and other outcomes after hip fracture surgery. METHODS: This was a phase II, multicentre, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, controlled clinical trial conducted in hospitals in six European countries (September 2010 to October 2014)...
January 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Yi-Feng Miao, Tao Peng, Melanie R Moody, Melvin E Klegerman, Jaroslaw Aronowski, James Grotta, David D McPherson, Hyunggun Kim, Shao-Ling Huang
Xenon (Xe), a noble gas, has promising neuroprotective properties with no proven adverse side-effects. We evaluated neuroprotective effects of Xe delivered by Xe-containing echogenic liposomes (Xe-ELIP) via ultrasound-controlled cerebral drug release on early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The Xe-ELIP structure was evaluated by ultrasound imaging, electron microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Animals were randomly divided into five groups: Sham, SAH, SAH treated with Xe-ELIP, empty ELIP, or Xe-saturated saline...
January 11, 2018: Scientific Reports
Rita Campos-Pires, Mariia Koziakova, Amina Yonis, Ashni Pau, Warren Macdonald, Katie Harris, Christopher Edge, Nicholas P Franks, Peter Mahoney, Robert Dickinson
The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective efficacy of the inert gas xenon as a treatment for blast-induced traumatic brain injury in an in vitro laboratory model. We developed a novel blast traumatic brain injury model using C57BL/6N mouse organotypic hippocampal brain-slice cultures exposed to a single shockwave, with the resulting injury quantified using propidium iodide fluorescence. A shock tube blast generator was used to simulate open field explosive blast shockwaves, modeled by the Friedlander waveform...
December 29, 2017: Journal of Neurotrauma
Hélène N David, Benoit Haelewyn, Jean-Éric Blatteau, Jean-Jacques Risso, Nicolas Vallée, Jacques H Abraini
Xenon (Xe) is considered to be the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen in air. These physical characteristics could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective action of Xe by increasing the patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, helium (He) is a cost-efficient gas with a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is far less potent than Xe...
July 2017: Medical Gas Research
Jacques H Abraini, Hélène N David, Jean-Éric Blatteau, Jean Jacques Risso, Nicolas Vallée
The noble gases xenon (Xe) and helium (He) are known to possess neuroprotective properties. Xe is considered the golden standard neuroprotective gas. However, Xe has a higher molecular weight and lower thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, the main diluent of oxygen (O2) in air, conditions that could impair or at least reduce the intrinsic neuroprotective properties of Xe by increasing the critical care patient's respiratory workload and body temperature. In contrast, He has a lower molecular weight and higher thermal conductivity and specific heat than those of nitrogen, but is unfortunately far less potent than Xe at providing neuroprotection...
July 2017: Medical Gas Research
Nathalie Colloc'h, Philippe Carpentier, Laura C Montemiglio, Beatrice Vallone, Thierry Prangé
Internal cavities are crucial for conformational flexibility of proteins and can be mapped through noble gas diffusion and docking. Here we investigate the hydrophobic cavities and tunnel network in neuroglobin (Ngb), a hexacoordinated heme protein likely to be involved in neuroprotection, using crystallography under noble gas pressure, mostly at room temperature. In murine Ngb, a large internal cavity is involved in the heme sliding mechanism to achieve binding of gaseous ligands through coordination to the heme iron...
November 21, 2017: Biophysical Journal
Michael Veldeman, Mark Coburn, Rolf Rossaint, Hans Clusmann, Kay Nolte, Benedikt Kremer, Anke Höllig
OBJECTIVE: The neuroprotective properties of the noble gas xenon have already been demonstrated using a variety of injury models. Here, we examine for the first time xenon's possible effect in attenuating early brain injury (EBI) and its influence on posthemorrhagic microglial neuroinflammation in an in vivo rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 22) were randomly assigned to receive either Sham surgery (n = 9; divided into two groups) or SAH induction via endovascular perforation (n = 13, divided into two groups)...
2017: Frontiers in Neurology
Sarah Devroe, Roselien Meeusen, Marc Gewillig, Bjorn Cools, Koen Poesen, Robert Sanders, Steffen Rex
BACKGROUND: Xenon has repeatedly been demonstrated to have only minimal hemodynamic side effects when compared to other anesthetics. Moreover, in experimental models, xenon was found to be neuroprotective and devoid of developmental neurotoxicity. These properties could render xenon attractive for the anesthesia in neonates and infants with congenital heart disease. However, experience with xenon anesthesia in children is scarce. AIMS: We hypothesized that in children undergoing cardiac catheterization, general anesthesia with a combination of sevoflurane with xenon results in superior hemodynamic stability, compared to sevoflurane alone...
December 2017: Paediatric Anaesthesia
Jérémie Lavaur, Déborah Le Nogue, Marc Lemaire, Jan Pype, Géraldine Farjot, Etienne C Hirsch, Patrick P Michel
Despite its low chemical reactivity, the noble gas xenon possesses a remarkable spectrum of biological effects. In particular, xenon is a strong neuroprotectant in preclinical models of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. In this study, we wished to determine whether xenon retained its neuroprotective potential in experimental settings that model the progressive loss of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons in Parkinson's disease. Using rat midbrain cultures, we established that xenon was partially protective for DA neurons through either direct or indirect effects on these neurons...
July 2017: Journal of Neurochemistry
Cong Hua, Wei-Na Ju, Hang Jin, Xin Sun, Gang Zhao
Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway...
January 2017: Neural Regeneration Research
Azeem Alam, Ka Chun Suen, Zac Hana, Robert D Sanders, Mervyn Maze, Daqing Ma
Growing and consistent preclinical evidence, combined with early clinical epidemiological observations, suggest potentially neurotoxic effects of commonly used anesthetic agents in the developing brain. This has prompted the FDA to issue a safety warning for all sedatives and anesthetics approved for use in children under three years of age. Recent studies have identified dexmedetomidine, the potent α2-adrenoceptor agonist, and xenon, the noble gas, as effective anesthetic adjuvants that are both less neurotoxic to the developing brain, and also possess neuroprotective properties in neonatal and other settings of acute ongoing neurologic injury...
March 2017: Neurotoxicology and Teratology
Edibe Pembegül Yıldız, Barış Ekici, Burak Tatlı
Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most important reason for morbidity and mortality in term-born infants. Understanding pathophysiology of the brain damage is essential for the early detection of patients with high risk for HIE and development of strategies for their treatments. Areas covered: This review discusses pathophysiology of the neonatal HIE and its treatment options, including hypothermia, melatonin, allopurinol, topiramate, erythropoietin, N-acetylcyctein, magnesium sulphate and xenon...
May 2017: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Melvin E Klegerman, Melanie R Moody, Jermaine R Hurling, Tao Peng, Shao-Ling Huang, David D McPherson
RATIONALE: We have produced a liposomal formulation of xenon (Xe-ELIP) as a neuroprotectant for inhibition of brain damage in stroke patients. This mandates development of a reliable assay to measure the amount of dissolved xenon released from Xe-ELIP in water and blood samples. METHODS: Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantify xenon gas released into the headspace of vials containing Xe-ELIP samples in water or blood. In order to determine blood concentration of xenon in vivo after Xe-ELIP administration, 6 mg of Xe-ELIP lipid was infused intravenously into rats...
January 15, 2017: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry: RCM
J Lavaur, M Lemaire, J Pype, D Le Nogue, E C Hirsch, P P Michel
Noble gases such as xenon and argon have been reported to provide neuroprotection against acute brain ischemic/anoxic injuries. Herein, we wished to evaluate the protective potential of these two gases under conditions relevant to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders. For that, we established cultures of neurons typically affected in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology, that is, cortical neurons and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons and exposed them to L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (PDC) to generate sustained, low-level excitotoxic stress...
2016: Cell Death Discovery
Shiyao Liu, Yanwei Yang, Mu Jin, Siyu Hou, Xiuhua Dong, Jiakai Lu, Weiping Cheng
Previous studies have shown that xenon-delayed postconditioning for up to 2h after reperfusion provides protection against spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. This study was designed to determine the roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in this neuroprotection. The rats were randomly assigned to the following nine groups (n=16∗9): 1) I/R+N2 group, 2) I/R+Xe group, 3) I/R+PD98059+N2 group (ERK blocking agent), 4) I/R+wortmannin+N2 group (PI3K-Akt blocking agent), 5) I/R+PD98059+Xe group, 6) I/R+wortmannin+Xe group, 7) I/R+DMSO+Xe group (dimethyl sulfoxide, vehicle control), 8) I/R+DMSO+N2 group, and 9) sham group (no spinal cord ischemia and no xenon)...
September 15, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Hemmen Sabir, Damjan Osredkar, Elke Maes, Thomas Wood, Marianne Thoresen
BACKGROUND: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment following perinatal asphyxia in newborn infants. Experimentally, TH is neuroprotective after moderate hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in seven-day-old (P7) rats. However, TH is not neuroprotective after severe HI. After a moderate HI insult in newborn brain injury models, the anesthetic gas xenon (Xe) doubles TH neuroprotection. The aim of this study was to examine whether combining Xe and TH is neuroprotective as applied in a P7 rat model of severe HI...
2016: PloS One
Julie De Deken, Steffen Rex, Diethard Monbaliu, Jacques Pirenne, Ina Jochmans
OBJECTIVE: Noble gases have been attributed to organ protective effects in ischemia reperfusion injury in a variety of medical conditions, including cerebral and cardiac ischemia, acute kidney injury, and transplantation. The aim of this study was to appraise the available evidence by systematically reviewing the literature and performing meta-analyses. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Inclusion criteria specified any articles on noble gases and either ischemia reperfusion injury or transplantation...
September 2016: Critical Care Medicine
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