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Nasal cannula

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29457114/a-pediatric-case-developing-critical-abdominal-distension-caused-by-a-combination-of-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-and-nasal-airway
#1
Satoki Inoue, Yumiko Tamaki, Shota Sonobe, Junji Egawa, Masahiko Kawaguchi
Background: We describe a pediatric patient who suffered from critical abdominal distention caused by a combination of humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) oxygen therapy and nasal airway. Case presentation: A 21-month-old boy with a history of chronic lung disease was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediately after admission, his airway was established using a tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation was started. Five days after the commencement of mechanical ventilation, finally, his trachea was extubated...
2018: JA Clin Rep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452816/transnasal-humidified-rapid-insufflation-ventilatory-exchange-for-oxygenation-of-children-during-apnoea-a-prospective-randomised-controlled-trial
#2
T Riva, T H Pedersen, S Seiler, N Kasper, L Theiler, R Greif, M Kleine-Brueggeney
BACKGROUND: Transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) comprises the administration of heated, humidified, and blended air/oxygen mixtures via nasal cannula at rates of ≥2 litres kg -1 min -1 . The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the length of the safe apnoea time using THRIVE with two different oxygen concentrations (100% vs 30% oxygen) compared with standard low-flow 100% oxygen administration. METHODS: Sixty patients, aged 1-6 yr, weighing 10-20 kg, undergoing general anaesthesia for elective surgery, were randomly allocated to receive one of the following oxygen administration methods during apnoea: 1) low-flow 100% oxygen at 0...
March 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29436355/care-of-the-neonate-on-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-a-bedside-guide
#3
Jennifer M Guay, Dru Carvi, Deborah A Raines, Wendy A Luce
Respiratory distress continues to be a major cause of neonatal morbidity. Current neonatal practice recommends the use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in the immediate resuscitation and continued support of neonates of all gestations with clinical manifestations of respiratory distress. Despite the many short- and long-term benefits of nCPAP, many neonatal care units have met resistance in its routine use. Although there have been numerous recent publications investigating the use and outcomes of various modes of nCPAP delivery, surfactant administration, mechanical ventilation, and other forms of noninvasive respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannula, nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation), there has been a relative lack of publications addressing the practical bedside care of infants managed on nCPAP...
January 1, 2018: Neonatal Network: NN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432361/single-port-thoracoscopic-pericardial-window-under-local-anesthesia
#4
Chang Y Park, Niall C McGonigle
There are numerous surgical approaches for the treatment of pericardial effusions but no clear consensus of best management. We present a 44-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer presenting with a new 2-cm pericardial effusion on ultrasound. In light of the patient's palliative condition and the urgent need for chemotherapy, careful consideration was made for her surgical drainage of the pericardial effusion. Because of the patient's medical comorbidities, a general anesthetic was deemed not to be in the patient's best interest...
February 9, 2018: Innovations: Technology and Techniques in Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432140/noise-exposure-from-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-a-bench-study-on-noise-reduction
#5
Takamitsu Kubo, Hiroaki Nakajima, Ryo Shimoda, Tatsuya Seo, Yurie Kanno, Toshikazu Kondo, Sunao Tamai
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy produces noise at a level such that patients often complain. However, the noise level has not been measured digitally. METHODS: We evaluated 3 types of HFNCs without filters and 2 types with filters attached for noise reduction. Optiflow (with and without a filter), MaxVenturi (with and without a filter) and AIRVO2 (without a filter only) were positioned at the center of a hospital room. We measured the noise levels at the distance of 1 m from the equipment at various total flows (30, 40, 50, 60 L/min) and F IO 2 (0...
February 6, 2018: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29431543/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-therapy-utilization-7-year-experience-at-a-community-teaching-hospital
#6
Mihaela S Stefan, Patrick Eckert, Bogdan Tiru, Jennifer Friderici, Peter K Lindenauer, Jay S Steingrub
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) between 2008 and 2014 in patients 18 years or older at a community teaching hospital. METHODS: Yearly utilization rates of HFNC, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) were calculated among admissions with a set of cardiopulmonary diagnoses (heart failure, COPD, asthma or pneumonia). RESULTS: Among the 41,711 admissions with at least one of the above cardiopulmonary condition, HFNC was utilized in 1,128 or 27...
February 15, 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29429222/-the-application-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-respiratory-sleep-diseases
#7
Y Hu, F Han
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 12, 2018: Chinese Journal of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420848/why-do-children-with-severe-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia-not-attend-neonatal-follow-up-care-parental-views-of-barriers
#8
Jennifer M Brady, Nicole Pouppirt, Judy Bernbaum, Jo Ann D'Agostino, Marsha Gerdes, Casey Hoffman, Noah Cook, Hallam Hurt, Haresh Kirpalani, Sara B DeMauro
AIM: To assess in children with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia at a corrected age of 18-36 months: 1)Neonatal follow-up clinic attendance rates; 2)Parent-identified reasons for difficulty attending neonatal follow-up. METHODS: Mixed methods study utilizing semi-structured phone interviews with parents of infants eligible for follow-up with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia (defined as gestational age <32 weeks and requiring ≥30% FiO2 and/or > two liters nasal cannula at 36 weeks postmenstrual age) at 18-36 months corrected age...
February 8, 2018: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29420246/ards-complicating-pustular-psoriasis-treatment-with-low-dose-corticosteroids-vitamin-c-and-thiamine
#9
Paul Ellis Marik, Ashleigh Long
We report the case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of psoriasis, admitted to our Medical intensive care unit following the acute onset of diffuse rash and progressive dyspnoea and hypoxaemia requiring escalating respiratory support (continuous positive airway pressure of 10 cm H2O). Her chest X-ray was consistent with findings of non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. Echocardiogram was normal. Dermatology considered her skin lesions to be consistent with psoriasis vulgaris with pustular flare. In the absence of an identifiable cause for her respiratory failure, she was diagnosed with acute respiratory distress syndrome due to her psoriatic flare...
February 2, 2018: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29416489/use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-for-emergency-pericardiocentesis-in-a-case-of-anterior-mediastinal-mass
#10
Ketan Sakharam Kulkarni, Pushkar Mahendra Desai, Amruta Milind Shringarpure, Manjula Sarkar
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2018: Saudi Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29393237/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-nasal-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-primary-respiratory-support-in-preterm-infants-with-respiratory-distress-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#11
Srinivas Murki, Jayesh Singh, Chiragkumar Khant, Swarup Kumar Dash, Tejo Pratap Oleti, Percy Joy, Nandkishor S Kabra
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress...
January 23, 2018: Neonatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29393013/-can-we-not-do-without-oxygen-administration-through-a-nasal-cannula
#12
Y M Smulders, J G van den Aardweg
Nasal cannulae for oxygen administration are applied abundantly in clinical medicine, even though their use may cause patient discomfort. Although nasal cannulae may be effective in increasing oxygen uptake to some degree, they are unlikely to prevent severe hypoxaemia. Furthermore, they are often used when arterial oxygen saturation is already ≥ 90%, in which case additional oxygenation is usually not required, nor does it relieve the sensation of dyspnoea.
2018: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29392846/high-flow-nasal-cannulae-oxygen-therapy-in-acute-moderate-hypercapnic-respiratory-failure
#13
Myoung Kyu Lee, Jaehwa Choi, Bonil Park, Bumjoon Kim, Seok Jeong Lee, Sang-Ha Kim, Suk Joong Yong, Eun Hee Choi, Won-Yeon Lee
INTRODUCTION: Severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is a significant event that results in substantial mortality. OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the effectiveness of the high flow nasal cannulae (HFNC) therapy in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic acute respiratory failure (ARF) compared to non-invasive ventilation (NIV). METHODS: The prospective observational trial was performed to compare the effectiveness between the HFNC and NIV in severe AECOPD with moderate hypercapnic ARF...
February 2, 2018: Clinical Respiratory Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29372630/what-can-we-apply-to-manage-acute-exacerbation-of-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease-with-acute-respiratory-failure
#14
REVIEW
Deog Kyeom Kim, Jungsil Lee, Ju Hee Park, Kwang Ha Yoo
Acute exacerbation(s) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) tend to be critical and debilitating events leading to poorer outcomes in relation to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment modalities, and contribute to a higher and earlier mortality rate in COPD patients. Besides pro-active preventative measures intended to obviate acquisition of AECOPD, early recovery from severe AECOPD is an important issue in determining the long-term prognosis of patients diagnosed with COPD. Updated GOLD guidelines and recently published American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society clinical recommendations emphasize the importance of use of pharmacologic treatment including bronchodilators, systemic steroids and/or antibiotics...
January 24, 2018: Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29354672/impact-of-heated-humidified-high-flow-air-via-nasal-cannula-on-respiratory-effort-in-patients-with-chronic-obstructive-pulmonary-disease
#15
Charles W Atwood, Sharon Camhi, Kathryn C Little, Colleen Paul, Hobart Schweikert, Nicholas J Macmillan, Thomas L Miller
Background: High flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) has been widely adopted for respiratory distress, and evidence suggests that purging dead space of the upper airway improves gas fractions in the lung. This study tests the hypothesis that HFNC with room air could be as effective as low flow oxygen in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Thirty-two COPD patients prescribed 1 - 2 L/min of oxygen were studied. The conditions tested consisted of a control (CTRL; no therapy), then in random order HFNC and prescribed low flow oxygen (LFO)...
August 15, 2017: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: Journal of the COPD Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29354669/sorting-out-the-mechanisms-of-benefit-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-stable-copd
#16
Gerard Criner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 11, 2017: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases: Journal of the COPD Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29351759/tracheal-intubation-in-critically-ill-patients-a-comprehensive-systematic-review-of-randomized-trials
#17
Luca Cabrini, Giovanni Landoni, Martina Baiardo Radaelli, Omar Saleh, Carmine D Votta, Evgeny Fominskiy, Alessandro Putzu, Cézar Daniel Snak de Souza, Massimo Antonelli, Rinaldo Bellomo, Paolo Pelosi, Alberto Zangrillo
BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled studies evaluating any drug, technique or device aimed at improving the success rate or safety of tracheal intubation in the critically ill. METHODS: We searched PubMed, BioMed Central, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials and references of retrieved articles. Finally, pertinent reviews were also scanned to detect further studies until May 2017. The following inclusion criteria were considered: tracheal intubation in adult critically ill patients; randomized controlled trial; study performed in Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department or ordinary ward; and work published in the last 20 years...
January 20, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29343034/-a-study-on-the-effects-and-safety-of-sequential-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygenation-therapy-on-the-copd-patients-after-extubation
#18
J C Zhang, F X Wu, L L Meng, C Y Zeng, Y Q Lu
Objective: To investigate and compare the effect and safety of nasal high-flow oxygen therapy (HFNCO) and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) therapy after extubation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: All COPD patients subjected to mechanical ventilation in the Emergency Intensive Unit of the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University during January 2015 to June 2016 were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups after extubation and HFNCO and NIV were adopted on each group respectively...
January 9, 2018: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29331328/pilot-clinical-trial-of-high-flow-oxygen-therapy-in-children-with-asthma-in-the-emergency-service
#19
Yolanda Ballestero, Jimena De Pedro, Nancy Portillo, Otilia Martinez-Mugica, Eunate Arana-Arri, Javier Benito
OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy and safety in children with asthma and moderate respiratory failure in the emergency department (ED). STUDY DESIGN: This was a prospective randomized pilot trial of children (aged 1-14 years) presenting to a tertiary academic pediatric ED with moderate-to-severe asthma exacerbations between September 2012 and December 2015. Patients with a pulmonary score (PS) ≥6 or oxygen saturation <94% with a face mask despite initial treatment (salbutamol/ipratropium bromide and corticosteroids) were randomized to HFNC or to conventional oxygen therapy...
January 11, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29317050/carbon-dioxide-therapy-in-hypocapnic-respiratory-failure
#20
P O O Julu, M Shah, J A Monro, B K Puri
Oxygen therapy, usually administered by a facemask or nasal cannulae, is the current default treatment of respiratory failure. Since respiration entails intake of oxygen and release of carbon dioxide from tissues as waste product, the notion of administering carbon dioxide in respiratory failure appears counter-intuitive. However, carbon dioxide stimulates the chemosensitive area of the medulla, known as the central respiratory chemoreceptor, which activates the respiratory groups of neurones in the brainstem and stimulates inspiration thereby initiating oxygen intake during normal breathing...
January 2018: Medical Hypotheses
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