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(Contact dermatitis)

Camille Loranger, Maisa Alfalah, Marie-Christine Ferrier Le Bouedec, Denis Sasseville
Ecologically sound because they are synthesized from natural and renewable sources, the mild surfactants alkyl glucosides are being rediscovered by the cosmetic industry. They are currently found in rinse-off products such as shampoos, liquid cleansers, and shower gels, but also in leave-on products that include moisturizers, deodorants, and sunscreens. During the past 15 years, numerous cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been published, mostly to lauryl and decyl glucosides, and these compounds are considered emergent allergens...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Taylor Braunberger, Darren Lynn, Christie Reimer, Monica Doctor, Mary K Hill, Jessica Mounessa, Cory A Dunnick
BACKGROUND: Contact dermatitis (CD) has been assessed by numerous disease severity indices resulting in heterogeneity across published research. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate published CD severity scales and identify a criterion standard for assessment. METHODS: Scopus and Ovid MEDLINE were searched for human randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on CD severity measures published during a 10-year period. Eligible studies were English-language RCTs reporting disease severity outcome measures for CD in humans...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Katherine R Grey, Erin M Warshaw
Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Kimberly A Huerth, Jason E Hawkes, Laurence J Meyer, Douglas L Powell
The Euphorbiaceae family (commonly known as "spurge") is a large, diverse, and widely distributed family of plants that encompass around 300 genera and more than 8000 species. Their attractiveness and hearty nature have made them popular for both indoor ornamentation and outdoor landscaping. Despite their ubiquity, the potential to cause irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) is often overlooked in favor of more notorious causes of phytodermatitis, namely, Toxicodendron species and nettles. We examined case reports spanning 40 years and discovered that spurge-induced ICD tends to befall children and middle-aged adults who unwittingly encounter the plant through play or horticulture, respectively...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Maisa Alfalah, Camille Loranger, Denis Sasseville
Alkyl glucosides are surfactants synthesized through the condensation of long-chain fatty alcohols and glucose, extracted from vegetal, renewable sources. Although available for more than 4 decades, they have been rediscovered in recent years because of their eco-friendly character. They are used in various leave-on and rinse-off cosmetics and are considered of low irritancy and allergenicity. However, since the early 2000s, cases of allergic contact dermatitis to this family of molecules have been repeatedly reported...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Amir Zahir, Chesahna Kindred, Brunhilde Blömeke, Carsten Goebel, Anthony A Gaspari
BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis after exposure to p-phenylenediamine (PPD)-containing hair dye products is a common and important clinical problem. Because there is a high rate of cross-elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis to other important hair dye products (such as p-toluene diamine and other aminophenol hair dyes) in PPD-allergic patients, safer alternative dyes with excellent hair coloring options are needed. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to study tolerance to Me-PPD in a PPD-allergic cohort...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Erin M Warshaw, Solveig L Hagen, Denis Sasseville, Howard I Maibach, Joel G DeKoven, Donald V Belsito, Joseph F Fowler, Kathryn A Zug, James S Taylor, C G Toby Mathias, Anthony F Fransway, Vincent A DeLeo, James G Marks, Melanie D Pratt, Matthew J Zirwas, Frances J Storrs
BACKGROUND: Contact dermatoses are common in mechanic and repair occupations. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to (1) estimate the prevalence of occupationally related contact dermatitis among mechanics/repairers patch tested from 1998 to 2014 by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, (2) characterize responsible allergens and irritants, and their sources, and (3) compare results among 3 occupational subgroups (mechanics, electrical/electronic, and other). METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 1998 and 2014...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Stefano Veraldi, Paolo Mascagni, Diego Tosi, Michela Brena
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Joel G DeKoven, Erin M Warshaw, Donald V Belsito, Denis Sasseville, Howard I Maibach, James S Taylor, James G Marks, Joseph F Fowler, C G Toby Mathias, Vince A DeLeo, Melanie D Pratt, Matthew J Zirwas, Kathryn A Zug
BACKGROUND: Patch testing is the most important diagnostic tool for the assessment of allergic contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVE: This study documents the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) patch testing results from January 1, 2013, to December 31, 2014. METHODS: At 13 centers in North America, patients were tested in a standardized manner with a screening series of 70 allergens. Data were manually verified and entered into a central database...
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Anton de Groot, Erich Schmidt
Some aspects of peppermint oil, lavender oil, and lemongrass oil are discussed including their botanical origin, uses of the plants and the oils, chemical composition, contact allergy to and allergic contact dermatitis from these essential oils, and causative allergenic ingredients.
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Jordan Huber, Rosemary deShazo, Douglas Powell, Keith Duffy, Christopher Hull
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 21, 2016: Dermatitis
Auksė Zinkevičienė, Denis Kainov, Irutė Girkontaitė, Eglė Lastauskienė, Violeta Kvedarienė, Yu Fu, Simon Anders, Vidya Velagapudi
BACKGROUND: Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is an inflammatory skin disease caused by repeated skin exposure to contact allergens. The severity and duration of this disease are associated with many different factors. Some of these factors may represent markers for monitoring disease activity and the individual response to an intervention. METHODS: We used a targeted metabolomics approach to find such factors in the serum of individuals with ACD. Metabolomics profiles were examined and compared in the acute phase of the disease and also in the absence of disease activity...
October 22, 2016: International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Mona M A Abdel-Mottaleb, Alf Lamprecht
Recently, a selective preferential accumulation of polymeric nanoparticles (in the size range around 100nm) has been observed in the follicular system of dermatitis skin. The present investigation aimed at clearly investigating the effect of irritant contact dermatitis on the barrier permeability for colloidal systems below this size range, namely quantum dots and hydrophilic macromolecules. Irritant dermatitis was induced in mice and the penetrability of quantum dots (5nm) and hydrophilic dextran molecules has been tracked in both healthy and inflamed skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy...
October 19, 2016: International Journal of Pharmaceutics
E Proksch, D Dähnhardt, S Dähnhardt-Pfeiffer, R Fölster-Holst
The permeability barrier plays an important role in numerous skin diseases. Particularly well known is the importance of this barrier in eczema. In irritative-toxic contact dermatitis, the first step in the pathogenesis is the disturbance of the permeability barrier by irritative-toxic noxious substances. Only after damage to the barrier is achieved can irritants and allergens penetrate into the living epidermis. In atopic eczema due to an impaired barrier, allergens penetrate from the environment into the skin and cause or worsen the eczema...
October 21, 2016: Der Hautarzt; Zeitschrift Für Dermatologie, Venerologie, und Verwandte Gebiete
Gabriel Chia Shi Zhe, Andrew Green, Yuke Tien Fong, Haur Yueh Lee, Sweet Far Ho
Sodium hypochlorite is a clear yellowish solution with a characteristic odour of chlorine and is commonly used as a disinfectant and a bleaching agent. It is used in various healthcare settings for its fast-acting and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. It is a known irritant and there are some reports that it can also cause allergic contact dermatitis of type IV hypersensitivity. We report a case of work-related type I hypersensitivity to sodium hypochlorite, presenting with recurrent urticarial rash and a positive prick test reaction to this chemical...
October 21, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Giuseppe Ruggiero, Claudia Carnevale, Andrea Diociaiuti, Fabio Arcangeli, May El Hachem
BACKGROUND: Contact dermatitis can be defined as an inflammatory process affecting the skin surface and induced by contact with chemical, physical and/or biotic agents in the environment. It causes lesions to skin, mucosae and semi-mucosae by means of allergic and irritant pathogenic mechanisms. Among the main triggers of contact dermatitis in the pediatric age are chemical or physical agents, which cause irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), and sensitizers, which cause a tissue damage through an allergic mechanism (allergic contact dermatitis [ACD])...
December 2016: Minerva Pediatrica
Malin Engfeldt, Lina Hagvall, Marléne Isaksson, Mihály Matura, Martin Mowitz, Kristina Ryberg, Berndt Stenberg, Cecilia Svedman, Magnus Bruze
BACKGROUND: In 2014, the fragrance hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde (HICC) was excluded from the Swedish baseline series. OBJECTIVES: To study (i) whether fragrance mix (FM) II with 5% HICC detects more positive reactions than FM II with 2.5% HICC, and (ii) the reproducibility of patch testing with HICC. METHODS: Two thousand one hundred and eighteen dermatitis patients at five Swedish dermatology departments were consecutively tested with FM II 14% pet...
October 21, 2016: Contact Dermatitis
Ayca Aktas Sukuroglu, Dilek Battal, Sema Burgaz
BACKGROUND: Henna has a very low allergic potential, and severe allergic contact dermatitis is mainly caused by p-phenylenediamine (PPD), which is added to temporary black 'henna tattoos', and potentially also by some heavy metals. OBJECTIVE: To determine the presence of, and quantify, Lawsone, PPD and heavy metal contaminants (cobalt, nickel, lead, and chromium) in commercial temporary black henna tattoo mixtures (n = 25) sold in Turkey. METHODS: Lawsone and PPD concentrations were analysed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and heavy metal quantification was performed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry...
October 19, 2016: Contact Dermatitis
James Raymond, Joseph Konya, Sophie Bakis-Petsoglou
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: JAAD Case Reports
Sakine Işik, Sule Caglayan-Sözmen, Özden Anal, Özkan Karaman, Nevin Uzuner
Allergic contact reactions to hair dyes arise mostly due to sensitization to para-phenylenediamine (PPD). Para-phenylenediamine, a derivative of p-nitroanaline, is widely used as an oxydizable hair dye and is also found in black henna tattoo. Subsequent exposure to PPD may lead to delayed type IV hypersensitivity reaction manifesting as acute contact dermatitis. Here, a 15-year-old girl is presented, who developed a hypersensitivity reaction after first exposure to hair dye. She was found to have been sensitized to PPD before, through application of black henna tatto...
October 4, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
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