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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28350900/gram-positive-bacterial-infections-research-priorities-accomplishments-and-future-directions-of-the-antibacterial-resistance-leadership-group
#1
Sarah B Doernberg, Thomas P Lodise, Joshua T Thaden, Jose M Munita, Sara E Cosgrove, Cesar A Arias, Helen W Boucher, G Ralph Corey, Franklin D Lowy, Barbara Murray, Loren G Miller, Thomas L Holland
Antimicrobial resistance in gram-positive bacteria remains a challenge in infectious diseases. The mission of the Gram-Positive Committee of the Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) is to advance knowledge in the prevention, management, and treatment of these challenging infections to improve patient outcomes. Our committee has prioritized projects involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) due to the scope of the medical threat posed by these pathogens...
March 15, 2017: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346935/dysbiosis-in-the-neonatal-period-role-of-cesarean-section
#2
Josef Neu
From epidemiological studies and studies done evaluating microbiomes in infants, there is a strong signal that the infants born by elective cesarean section (C-section) develop microbiota that differs from those babies born by vaginal delivery. Epidemiological studies show increased odds ratios for the development of immunological disorders such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, asthma, allergic diseases as well as metabolic diseases such as obesity in babies born by C-section. These are interesting associations, and if supported by additional studies that rigorously control for confounding factors, they will have major public health implications...
2017: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346926/microbiota-and-obesity
#3
Erika Isolauri
Obesity is globally the most prevalent nutritional disorder. Multifaceted therapeutic approaches are called for to halt the cascade from neonatal adiposity/high birth weight to childhood excessive weight gain/adult obesity with comorbidities. Recent experimental and clinical data provide one new target for interventions aiming to close this vicious circle: the microbiota. An aberrant gut microbiota, dysbiosis, induces immune and metabolic disturbances both locally and, consequent upon impaired gut barrier function, also systemic low-grade inflammation, which is causally linked to insulin resistance...
2017: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346921/bacterial-colonization-of-the-newborn-gut-immune-development-and-prevention-of-disease
#4
W Allan Walker
We now know that the fetus does not reside in a sterile intrauterine environment but is exposed to commensal bacteria from the maternal gut which cross the placenta and infiltrate the amniotic fluid. This exposure to colonizing bacteria continues at birth and during the first year of life, and it has a profound influence on lifelong health. Why is this important? Cross talk with colonizing bacteria in the developing neonatal intestine helps in the initial adaptation of the infant to extrauterine life, particularly in acquiring immune homeostasis, and provides protection against disease expression (e...
2017: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346920/microbial-composition-of-the-initial-colonization-of-newborns
#5
Samuli Rautava
Early-life interaction with indigenous intestinal microbes is a prerequisite for healthy immune and metabolic maturation. Human infants acquire their gut microbiota predominantly from the mother. A considerable inoculum of microbes is received by the neonate during vaginal delivery. Recent observations suggest that human gut colonization may be initiated prenatally by microbes in amniotic fluid, but the significance of this phenomenon remains unknown. After birth, neonatal gut colonization is guided by human milk factors, which selectively promote the growth of specific microbes, as well as by live microbes present in human milk...
2017: Nestlé Nutrition Institute Workshop Series
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346529/human-amnion-epithelial-cells-modulate-the-inflammatory-response-to-ventilation-in-preterm-lambs
#6
Jacqueline M Melville, Courtney A McDonald, Robert J Bischof, Graeme R Polglase, Rebecca Lim, Euan M Wallace, Graham Jenkin, Timothy J Moss
Ventilation of preterm neonates causes pulmonary inflammation that can contribute to lung injury, propagate systemically and result in long-term disease. Modulation of this initial response may reduce lung injury and its sequelae. We aimed to determine the effect of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) on immune activation and lung injury in preterm neonatal lambs. Preterm lambs received intratracheal hAECs (90x106) or vehicle, prior to 2 h of mechanical ventilation. Within 5 min of ventilation onset, lambs also received intravenous hAECs (90x106) or vehicle...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346225/long-telomeres-protect-against-age-dependent-cardiac-disease-caused-by-notch1-haploinsufficiency
#7
Christina V Theodoris, Foteini Mourkioti, Yu Huang, Sanjeev S Ranade, Lei Liu, Helen M Blau, Deepak Srivastava
Diseases caused by gene haploinsufficiency in humans commonly lack a phenotype in mice that are heterozygous for the orthologous factor, impeding the study of complex phenotypes and critically limiting the discovery of therapeutics. Laboratory mice have longer telomeres relative to humans, potentially protecting against age-related disease caused by haploinsufficiency. Here, we demonstrate that telomere shortening in NOTCH1-haploinsufficient mice is sufficient to elicit age-dependent cardiovascular disease involving premature calcification of the aortic valve, a phenotype that closely mimics human disease caused by NOTCH1 haploinsufficiency...
March 27, 2017: Journal of Clinical Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28345114/peripheral-endothelial-function-after-arterial-switch-operation-for-d-looped-transposition-of-the-great-arteries
#8
Heather Y Sun, Katie Jo Stauffer, Susan E Nourse, Chau Vu, Elif Seda Selamet Tierney
Coronary artery re-implantation during arterial switch operation in patients with D-looped transposition of the great arteries (D-TGA) can alter coronary arterial flow and increase shear stress, leading to local endothelial dysfunction, although prior studies have conflicting results. Endothelial pulse amplitude testing can predict coronary endothelial dysfunction by peripheral arterial testing. This study tested if, compared to healthy controls, patients with D-TGA after arterial switch operation had peripheral endothelial dysfunction...
March 27, 2017: Pediatric Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343909/pneumonia
#9
REVIEW
Thomas A Hooven, Richard A Polin
Neonatal pneumonia may occur in isolation or as one component of a larger infectious process. Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites are all potential causes of neonatal pneumonia, and may be transmitted vertically from the mother or acquired from the postnatal environment. The patient's age at the time of disease onset may help narrow the differential diagnosis, as different pathogens are associated with congenital, early-onset, and late-onset pneumonia. Supportive care and rationally selected antimicrobial therapy are the mainstays of treatment for neonatal pneumonia...
March 23, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343439/toward-improved-myocardial-maturity-in-an-organ-on-chip-platform-with-immature-cardiac-myocytes
#10
Sean P Sheehy, Anna Grosberg, Pu Qin, David J Behm, John P Ferrier, Mackenzie A Eagleson, Alexander P Nesmith, David Krull, James G Falls, Patrick H Campbell, Megan L McCain, Robert N Willette, Erding Hu, Kevin K Parker
In vitro studies of cardiac physiology and drug response have traditionally been performed on individual isolated cardiomyocytes or isotropic monolayers of cells that may not mimic desired physiological traits of the laminar adult myocardium. Recent studies have reported a number of advances to Heart-on-a-Chip platforms for the fabrication of more sophisticated engineered myocardium, but cardiomyocyte immaturity remains a challenge. In the anisotropic musculature of the heart, interactions between cardiac myocytes, the extracellular matrix (ECM), and neighboring cells give rise to changes in cell shape and tissue architecture that have been implicated in both development and disease...
January 1, 2017: Experimental Biology and Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342565/mini-review-new-pathogen-profiles-elizabethkingia-anophelis
#11
REVIEW
J Michael Janda, Denise L Lopez
Within a little more than 5 years since its taxonomic description in 2011, from the midgut of mosquitoes, Elizabethkingia anophelis has emerged as an important causes of sepsis in adults and children and in cases of neonatal meningitis. At least 3 moderate- to large-scale outbreaks of disease have been caused by this bacterium, the largest 2 occurring in the Midwest United States in 2015-2016. Several studies suggest that E. anophelis, and not E. meningoseptica, is the predominant human pathogen of this genus; identification to species is difficult...
March 16, 2017: Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341498/natural-history-of-iatrogenic-pediatric-femoral-artery-injury
#12
Elizabeth A Andraska, Tatum Jackson, Huiting Chen, Katherine A Gallagher, Jonathan L Eliason, Dawn M Coleman
INTRODUCTION: Iatrogenic femoral artery trauma complicates the course of critically-ill neonates and children. Complications from persistent arterial occlusion include claudication and limb length discrepancies. Data supporting risk factors for such and need for revascularization are lacking. METHODS: Review of a prospectively maintained database at a tertiary institution of iatrogenic pediatric femoral artery injuries incurred between 2013-2014 was performed. Additional injuries were identified by review of pediatric arterial duplex performed between 2008-2013...
March 21, 2017: Annals of Vascular Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341477/melatonin-reduces-hypoxic-ischaemic-hi-induced-autophagy-and-apoptosis-an-in-vivo-and-in-vitro-investigation-in-experimental-models-of-neonatal-hi-brain-injury
#13
Yingying Hu, Zhouguang Wang, Yanlong Liu, Shulin Pan, Hao Zhang, Mingchu Fang, Huai Jiang, Jiayu Yin, Shuangshuang Zou, Zhenmao Li, Hongyu Zhang, Zhenlang Lin, Jian Xiao
Melatonin has neuroprotective effects in many diseases, including neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic (HI) brain injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of melatonin both in vivo and in vitro and associated molecular mechanisms behind these effects. Postnatal day 7 male and female rat pups were subjected to unilateral HI, melatonin was injected intraperitoneally 1h before HI and an additional six doses were administered at 24h intervals. The pups were sacrificed at 24h and 7 d after HI...
March 21, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341439/restoring-pulmonary-surfactant-membranes-and-films-at-the-respiratory-surface
#14
REVIEW
Mercedes Echaide, Chiara Autilio, Raquel Arroyo, Jesus Perez-Gil
Pulmonary surfactant is a complex of lipids and proteins assembled and secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the thin layer of fluid coating the respiratory surface of lungs. There, surfactant forms interfacial films at the air-water interface, reducing dramatically surface tension and thus stabilizing the air-exposed interface to prevent alveolar collapse along respiratory mechanics. The absence or deficiency of surfactant produces severe lung pathologies. This review describes some of the most important surfactant-related pathologies, which are a cause of high morbidity and mortality in neonates and adults...
March 21, 2017: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28341233/neonatal-reflexes-and-behavior-in-hypertensive-rats-of-isiah-strain
#15
Diana S Ragaeva, Maria A Tikhonova, Olga M Petrova, Tatjana N Igonina, Irina N Rozkova, Eugeny Yu Brusentsev, Tamara G Amstislavskaya, Sergey Ya Amstislavsky
Hypertension is one of the most common diseases in humans, and there is a special concern on the consequences of maternal hypertensive conditions for the health of newborns. An inherited stress-induced arterial hypertension (ISIAH) rat strain has been selected but only a few studies have addressed behavior in these rats. Body weight, neurodevelopmental reflexes, and neuronal density in the hippocampus were compared in ISIAH and normotensive WAG rats during their suckling period. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), adult rat performance in the open field (OF), elevated plus maze (EPM), and novel object recognition (NOR) tests were evaluated at the age of 12-14weeks old...
March 21, 2017: Physiology & Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28340583/inflammatory-signature-of-cerebellar-neurodegeneration-during-neonatal-hyperbilirubinemia-in-ugt1-mouse-model
#16
Simone Vodret, Giulia Bortolussi, Jana Jašprová, Libor Vitek, Andrés F Muro
BACKGROUND: Severe hyperbilirubinemia is toxic during central nervous system development. Prolonged and uncontrolled high levels of unconjugated bilirubin lead to bilirubin-induced neurological damage and eventually death by kernicterus. Bilirubin neurotoxicity is characterized by a wide array of neurological deficits, including irreversible abnormalities in motor, sensitive and cognitive functions, due to bilirubin accumulation in the brain. Despite the abundant literature documenting the in vitro and in vivo toxic effects of bilirubin, it is unclear which molecular and cellular events actually characterize bilirubin-induced neurodegeneration in vivo...
March 24, 2017: Journal of Neuroinflammation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28340569/an-immunohistochemical-enzymatic-and-behavioral-study-of-cd157-bst-1-as-a-neuroregulator
#17
Haruhiro Higashida, Mingkun Liang, Toru Yoshihara, Shirin Akther, Azam Fakhrul, Cherepanov Stanislav, Tae-Sik Nam, Uh-Hyun Kim, Satoka Kasai, Tomoko Nishimura, Naila Al Mahmuda, Shigeru Yokoyama, Katsuhiko Ishihara, Maria Gerasimenko, Alla Salmina, Jing Zhong, Takahiro Tsuji, Chiharu Tsuji, Olga Lopatina
BACKGROUND: Recent rodent and human studies provide evidence in support of the fact that CD157, well known as bone marrow stromal cell antigen-1 (BST-1) and a risk factor in Parkinson's disease, also meaningfully acts in the brain as a neuroregulator and affects social behaviors. It has been shown that social behaviors are impaired in CD157 knockout mice without severe motor dysfunction and that CD157/BST1 gene single nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with autism spectrum disorder in humans...
March 24, 2017: BMC Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28340039/infant-birth-outcomes-are-associated-with-dna-damage-biomarkers-as-measured-by-the-cytokinesis-block-micronucleus-cytome-assay-the-dadhi-study
#18
Mansi Dass Singh, Philip Thomas, Maryam Hor, Theodora Almond, Julie Owens, William Hague, Michael Fenech
Accumulation of DNA damage in the first 1000 days may increase risk of accelerated ageing and degenerative diseases in adult life such as cancers. The extent of DNA damage in infants and the correlation of maternal factors during pregnancy with neonate birth outcomes and DNA damage is not known in infants born in Australia. Therefore, we performed a prospective cohort study to collect data on DNA damage in lymphocytes of Australian infants (aged 0, 3 and 6 months), using the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome (CBMN-Cyt) assay...
March 3, 2017: Mutagenesis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28338723/non-specific-effects-of-bcg-vaccination-on-morbidity-among-children-in-greenland-a-population-based-cohort-study
#19
S Haahr, S W Michelsen, M Andersson, K Bjorn-Mortensen, B Soborg, J Wohlfahrt, M Melbye, A Koch
Background: The potential non-specific effects of BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccination, with reported reduction of infectious disease morbidity among vaccinated children, in addition to the protective effect against tuberculosis (TB), are highly debated. In Greenland, BCG vaccination was introduced in 1955, but temporarily discontinued from 1991 to 1996 due to nationwide policy changes. Using the transient vaccination stop, we aimed to investigate possible non-specific effects of BCG vaccination by measuring nation-wide hospitalization rates due to infectious diseases other than TB among vaccinated and unvaccinated children...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28338487/the-evolution-of-disease-chronic-lung-disease-of-infancy-and-pulmonary-hypertension
#20
Michael C Tracy, David N Cornfield
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or chronic lung disease of infancy BPD was originally described 50 years ago, in 1967 by Northway et al. This article possesses two fundamental objectives to provide: a brief historical perspective on BPD; and an update relative to current notions of epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and clinical management of BPD complicated by vascular disease. The review highlights areas of consensus and ongoing uncertainty. RECENT FINDINGS: The clinical cause and presentation of infants with BPD has evolved over the past several decades...
March 23, 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
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