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Brain based psychotherapy

Gábor Kapócs, Felix Scholkmann, Vahid Salari, Noémi Császár, Henrik Szőke, István Bókkon
Today, there is an increased interest in research on lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) because it may offer new opportunities in psychotherapy under controlled settings. The more we know about how a drug works in the brain, the more opportunities there will be to exploit it in medicine. Here, based on our previously published papers and investigations, we suggest that LSD-induced visual hallucinations/phosphenes may be due to the transient enhancement of bioluminescent photons in the early retinotopic visual system in blind as well as healthy people...
October 12, 2016: Reviews in the Neurosciences
Gordon Parker, Stacey McCraw
BACKGROUND: The CORE measure was designed to assess a central feature of melancholia - signs of psychomotor disturbance (PMD) - and so provide an alternate non-symptom based measure of melancholia or of its probability. This review evaluates development and application studies undertaken over the last 25 years to consider how well it has met its original objectives. METHODS: All studies published using the CORE measure as either the only or an adjunctive measure of melancholia were obtained and are considered in this review...
September 25, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Leila M Soravia, Ariane Orosz, Simon Schwab, Masahito Nakataki, Roland Wiest, Andrea Federspiel
BACKGROUND: Imaging studies have provided evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is able to change brain activation in phobic patients in response to threatening stimuli. The changes occurred in both emotion-generating and modulatory regions. In this study, we use a data-driven approach to explore resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured by arterial spin labeling (ASL), before and after CBT. METHODS: Eight female patients with spider phobia were scanned before and 1 month after an exposure-based group therapy for spider phobia...
September 2016: Brain and Behavior
Bas T H de Veen, Arnt F A Schellekens, Michel M M Verheij, Judith R Homberg
INTRODUCTION: Evidence based treatment for Substance use disorders (SUD) includes psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. However, these are only partially effective. Hallucinogens, such as psilocybin, may represent potential new treatment options for SUD. This review provides a summary of (human) studies on the putative therapeutic effects of psilocybin, and discusses the receptor systems, brain regions and cognitive and emotional processes mediating psilocybin's effects. Psilocybin's chemical structure is similar to that of serotonin...
August 12, 2016: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Golan Shahar
An integrative-psychodynamic theory of criticism in self and relationships is presented (Shahar, 2015). My theoretical starting point is the tension between Authenticity (A; our inherited potential, tantamount to Winnicott's True Self) and Self-Knowledge (SK; what we [think] we know about ourselves). Self-criticism, a formidable dimension of vulnerability to a wide array of psychopathologies, is construed as a distorted form of self-knowledge, reducing internal confusion at the expense of widening the gap between A and SK...
2016: Psychodynamic Psychiatry
Douglas B Cooper, Amy O Bowles, Jan E Kennedy, Glenn Curtiss, Louis M French, David F Tate, Rodney D Vanderploeg
OBJECTIVE: To compare cognitive rehabilitation (CR) interventions for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with standard of care management, including psychoeducation and medical care for noncognitive symptoms. SETTING: Military medical center. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 126 service members who received mTBI from 3 to 24 months before baseline evaluation and reported ongoing cognitive difficulties. INTERVENTIONS: Randomized clinical trial with treatment outcomes assessed at baseline, 3-week, 6-week, 12-week, and 18-week follow-ups...
September 6, 2016: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Erin Walsh, Hannah Carl, Tory Eisenlohr-Moul, Jared Minkel, Andrew Crowther, Tyler Moore, Devin Gibbs, Chris Petty, Josh Bizzell, Moria J Smoski, Gabriel S Dichter
There are few reliable predictors of response to antidepressant treatments. In the present investigation we examined pretreatment functional brain connectivity during reward processing as a potential predictor of response to Behavioral Activation Therapy for Depression (BATD), a validated psychotherapy that promotes engagement with rewarding stimuli and reduces avoidance behaviors. Thirty-three outpatients with MDD and 20 matched controls completed two runs of the monetary incentive delay task during functional magnetic resonance imaging after which participants with MDD received up to 15 sessions of BATD...
September 2, 2016: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Jean-François Pelletier, Christine Boisvert, Marie-Claude Galipeau-Leduc, Christian Ducasse, Denis Pouliot-Morneau, Julie Bordeleau
Objectives Located at the heart of a mental health university institute in Montreal, Canada, the University of Recovery (UR) is a peer-run agency of service users who came together as a private non-profit organization to promote their experiential knowledge in science and public health, and to transform the academic milieu as an inclusive work environment conducive to recovery and full citizenship. UR students can thus have access to scientific conferences and classes on various topics and invite scientists or other professionals to further discuss new discoveries and techniques, and possible ways of improving healthcare from a patients' and service users' perspective...
2016: Santé Mentale Au Québec
Thomas Fovet, Natasza Orlov, Miriam Dyck, Paul Allen, Klaus Mathiak, Renaud Jardri
Auditory-verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are frequent and disabling symptoms, which can be refractory to conventional psychopharmacological treatment in more than 25% of the cases. Recent advances in brain imaging allow for a better understanding of the neural underpinnings of AVHs. These findings strengthened transdiagnostic neurocognitive models that characterize these frequent and disabling experiences. At the same time, technical improvements in real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) enabled the development of innovative and non-invasive methods with the potential to relieve psychiatric symptoms, such as fMRI-based neurofeedback (fMRI-NF)...
2016: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Yakov Shapiro, Nicholas John, Rowan Scott, Nadia Tomy
In the first article in this 2-part series, we outlined a psychobiological model of psychiatric treatment and reviewed the evidence showing psychotherapy to be a form of biological intervention that induces lasting alterations in brain structure and function. In this second article, we focus on the adaptive model of psychopathology, the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic interventions, the synergistic effects of combined psychotherapy and psychopharmacology treatments, and attention to the patient's subjective experience and the doctor-patient alliance to complement an "objective" case formulation...
July 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Practice
Elias Aboujaoude, Wael O Salame
Addiction is a major public health problem with few efficacious and safe treatments. The goal of this review is to provide an evidence-based assessment of the therapeutic role of the opioid antagonist naltrexone across the addiction spectrum-substance-based and behavioral. The PubMed database was searched for randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials that investigated the oral or intramuscular long-acting formulation of naltrexone in substance use disorders or behavioral addictions such as pathological gambling, kleptomania, and trichotillomania...
August 2016: CNS Drugs
Paul Enck, Qasim Aziz, Giovanni Barbara, Adam D Farmer, Shin Fukudo, Emeran A Mayer, Beate Niesler, Eamonn M M Quigley, Mirjana Rajilić-Stojanović, Michael Schemann, Juliane Schwille-Kiuntke, Magnus Simren, Stephan Zipfel, Robin C Spiller
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy...
2016: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
Yakov Shapiro, Nicholas John, Rowan Scott, Nadia Tomy
Economic, political, and ideological landscapes have impacted the practice of psychiatry throughout its evolution as a medical discipline. Despite enormous scientific advances over the course of the past century, many psychiatrists continue to operate with a split Cartesian picture of mind versus brain and entrenched ideological positions ranging from biological "chemical imbalance" to rigidly followed manualized psychotherapy approaches, both of which frequently result in fractured clinical care. With the impact of systemic economic and political pressures in Canada and the United States, the attention to the doctor-patient relationship has taken a back seat to high-volume practices, computerized assessment tools, and the focus on evidence-based treatments for behaviorally defined syndromes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders that often come at the expense of the patient's experience of his or her illness...
May 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Practice
David L Perez, W Curt LaFrance
Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a functional neurological disorder/conversion disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of neurology and psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management, and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions, and outcome studies...
June 2016: CNS Spectrums
Jay Vaughan, Elaine McCullough, Alan Burnell
This article describes the development and application of a wrap-around, multidisciplinary, brain-based, developmental and attachment-focussed intervention for children who have experienced significant trauma in the context of their early life. It outlines the presentation of the children and families who are referred to the service and the model of treatment that they receive. In doing so, it identifies the core components underpinning Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy (NPP) and links the application of the integrative model to research and practice in the field of neuroscience and attachment and to the use of therapeutic approaches that are beneficial to maltreated children and their adoptive parents...
March 16, 2016: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Denis G Sukhodolsky, Brent C Vander Wyk, Jeffrey A Eilbott, Spencer A McCauley, Karim Ibrahim, Michael J Crowley, Kevin A Pelphrey
OBJECTIVE: We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for aggression in children and adolescents, which is conducted in response to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach initiative. Specifically, the study is focused on the brain-behavior associations within the RDoC construct of frustrative non-reward. On the behavioral level, this construct is defined by reactions elicited in response to withdrawal or prevention of reward, most notably reactive aggression...
February 2016: Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology
Monica Beltran, Abena Nyamekye Brown-Elhillali, April Rose Held, Patrice Carlotta Ryce, Mirian Ebere Ofonedu, Daniel William Hoover, Kaitlin Mary Ensor, Harolyn Millicent Edith Belcher
BACKGROUND: Children who experience abuse and neglect and are exposed to adverse life events are at risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. They may display variable internalizing and externalizing symptoms, such as posttraumatic stress, depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, and aggression. Yoga may be able to regulate body-brain pathways that cause stress following traumatic experiences, thereby reducing adverse mental and physical sequelae. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this preliminary study is to examine changes in functioning following meetings of a yoga-based psychotherapy group (YBPG) for boys with a history of interpersonal trauma exposure...
January 2016: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine
Prathik Kini, Joel Wong, Sydney McInnis, Nicole Gabana, Joshua W Brown
Gratitude is a common aspect of social interaction, yet relatively little is known about the neural bases of gratitude expression, nor how gratitude expression may lead to longer-term effects on brain activity. To address these twin issues, we recruited subjects who coincidentally were entering psychotherapy for depression and/or anxiety. One group participated in a gratitude writing intervention, which required them to write letters expressing gratitude. The therapy-as-usual control group did not perform a writing intervention...
March 2016: NeuroImage
Breda Cullen, Jaycee Pownall, Joanne Cummings, Satu Baylan, Niall Broomfield, Caroline Haig, Denyse Kersel, Heather Murray, Jonathan J Evans
Psychological distress is common following acquired brain injury (ABI), but the evidence base for psychotherapeutic interventions is small and equivocal. Positive psychotherapy aims to foster well-being by increasing experiences of pleasure, engagement and meaning. In this pilot trial, we investigated the feasibility and acceptability of brief positive psychotherapy in adults with ABI and emotional distress. Participants were randomised to brief positive psychotherapy plus usual treatment, or usual treatment only...
January 4, 2016: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation
Julie Ribaudo
This clinical case study explores the integration of infancy research, brain development, attachment theory, and models of infant-parent/child-parent psychotherapy to address the needs of abused and neglected young children placed in foster or adoptive homes. Traumatized children employ defensive strategies to survive when there is no "good enough" caregiver (D.W. Winnicott, 1953, p. 94), and helping professionals can provide therapeutic experiences to develop or restore a child's sense of safety. With the case example of Anthony and his foster/adoptive parents, I illustrate how to manage and contain a traumatized child's terror, rage, and grief through therapeutic sessions with the parent and child together, and supportive parental guidance...
January 2016: Infant Mental Health Journal
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