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rapid cycling

Mark A Frye, Euijung Ryu, Malik Nassan, Gregory D Jenkins, Ana C Andreazza, Jared M Evans, Susan L McElroy, Devin Oglesbee, W Edward Highsmith, Joanna M Biernacka
Converging genetic, postmortem gene-expression, cellular, and neuroimaging data implicate mitochondrial dysfunction in bipolar disorder. This study was conducted to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and single nucleotide variants (SNVs) are associated with sub-phenotypes of bipolar disorder. MtDNA from 224 patients with Bipolar I disorder (BPI) was sequenced, and association of sequence variations with 3 sub-phenotypes (psychosis, rapid cycling, and adolescent illness onset) was evaluated...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Research
Magdalena M Sakowska, Megan V Thomas, Saxon Connor, Ross Roberts
BACKGROUND: In measuring quality of health-care delivery, digital infrastructure is essential. The aim at this tertiary centre was to create a hospital-wide workflow system that collected data prospectively as part of daily practice. METHODS: In moving towards an electronic health record, a hospital-wide integrated workflow system was introduced in 2013, which electronically managed the perioperative patient journey while simultaneously facilitating surgical audit...
October 21, 2016: ANZ Journal of Surgery
V M Kovalzon, L S Moiseenko, A V Ambaryan, S Kurtenbach, V I Shestopalov, Y V Panchin
Pannexins are membrane channel proteins that play a role in a number of critical biological processes (Panchin et al., 2000; Shestopalov, Panchin, 2008). Among other cellular functions, pannexin hemichannels serve as purine nucleoside conduits providing ATP efflux into the extracellular space (Dahl, 2015), where it is rapidly degraded to adenosine. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is abundantly expressed in the brain and has been shown to contribute to adenosine signaling in nervous system tissues (Prochnow, 2012)...
October 18, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Jong Ho Park, Jung Jin Park, O Ok Park, Jung Hoon Yang
Capacity decay in vanadium redox flow batteries during charge-discharge cycling has become an important issue because it lowers the practical energy density of the battery. The battery capacity tends to drop rapidly within the first tens of cycles and then drops more gradually over subsequent cycles during long-term operation. This paper analyzes and discusses the reasons for this early capacity decay. The imbalanced crossover rate of vanadium species was found to remain high until the total difference in vanadium concentration between the positive and negative electrolytes reached almost 1 mol dm(-3) ...
October 21, 2016: ChemSusChem
Matthew I Milowsky, Matthew D Galsky, Michael J Morris, Daniel J Crona, Daniel J George, Robert Dreicer, Kin Tse, Jesika Petruck, Iain J Webb, Neil H Bander, David M Nanus, Howard I Scher
BACKGROUND: This phase 1/2 study evaluated the dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose of MLN2704, a humanized monoclonal antibody MLN591 targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen, linked to the maytansinoid DM1 in patients with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 62 patients received MLN2704 at ascending doses on 4 schedules: weekly (60, 84, 118, and 165mg/m(2); 12 patients); every 2 weeks (120, 168, 236, and 330mg/m(2); 15 patients); every 3 weeks (330 and 426mg/m(2); 18 patients); and on days 1 and 15 of a 6-week schedule (6-week cycle, 330mg/m(2); 17 patients)...
October 17, 2016: Urologic Oncology
James J Cody, Wannaporn Ittiprasert, André N Miller, Lucie Henein, Margaret M Mentink-Kane, Michael H Hsieh
Schistosomiasis remains a health burden in many parts of the world. The complex life cycle of Schistosoma parasites and the economic and societal conditions present in endemic areas make the prospect of eradication unlikely in the foreseeable future. Continued and vigorous research efforts must therefore be directed at this disease, particularly since only a single World Health Organization (WHO)-approved drug is available for treatment. The National Institutes of Health (NIH)-National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Schistosomiasis Resource Center (SRC) at the Biomedical Research Institute provides investigators with the critical raw materials needed to carry out this important research...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Naoto Fujii, Maya Sarah Singh, Lyra Halili, Jeffrey C Louie, Glen P Kenny
During exercise, cutaneous vasodilation and sweating responses occur, whereas these responses rapidly decrease during postexercise recovery. We hypothesized that the activation of endothelin A (ETA) receptors, but not endothelin B (ETB) receptors, attenuate cutaneous vasodilation during high-intensity exercise and contribute to the subsequent postexercise suppression of cutaneous vasodilation. We also hypothesized that both receptors increase sweating during and following high-intensity exercise. Eleven males (24 ± 4 years) performed an intermittent cycling protocol consisting of two 30-min bouts of moderate- (40% VO2peak) and high- (75% VO2peak) intensity exercise in the heat (35°C), each separated by a 20- and 40-min recovery period, respectively...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
Raoyrin Chanavirut, Pattarapong Makarawate, Ian A Macdonald, Naruemon Leelayuwat
BACKGROUND: Imbalances of the autonomic nervous (ANS), the cardiovascular system, and ionics might contribute to the manifestation of The Brugada Syndrome (BrS). Thus, this study has aimed to investigate the cardio-respiratory fitness and the responses of the ANS both at rest and during a sub-maximal exercise stress test, in BrS patients and in gender-matched and age-matched healthy sedentary controls. METHODS: Eleven BrS patients and 23 healthy controls were recruited in Khon Kaen, Thailand...
October 2016: Journal of Arrhythmia
Shuai Gao, Yanfei Gao, Housheng Hansen He, Dong Han, Wanting Han, Amy Avery, Jill A Macoska, Xiaming Liu, Sen Chen, Fen Ma, Shaoyong Chen, Steven P Balk, Changmeng Cai
Although well characterized as a transcriptional activator that drives prostate cancer (PCa) growth, androgen receptor (AR) can function as a transcriptional repressor, and high-level androgens can suppress PCa proliferation. The molecular basis for this repression activity remains to be determined. Genes required for DNA replication are highly enriched among androgen-repressed genes, and AR is recruited to the majority of these genes, where it rapidly represses their transcription. This activity is enhanced in PCa cells expressing high AR levels and is mediated by recruitment of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb)...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
Roxann Diez Gross, Ronit Gisser, Gregory Cherpes, Katie Hartman, Rishi Maheshwary
Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is caused by a genetic imprinting abnormality resulting from the lack of expression of the paternal genes at 15q11-q13. Intellectual disability, low muscle tone, and life-threatening hyperphagia are hallmarks of the phenotype. The need for the Heimlich maneuver, death from choking, and pulmonary infection occur in a disproportionally high number of persons with PWS. The widely held belief is that eating behaviors are responsible for choking and aspiration; yet, no investigation had sought to determine if swallowing impairments were present in persons with PWS...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Geon-Hyoung An, Do-Young Lee, Yu-Jin Lee, Hyo-Jin Ahn
The use of metal oxides as anode materials in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are of significant interest to many potential technologies, due to their high theoretical capacity, cost-effectiveness, and environmentally friendly features. In spite of these considerable benefits, and ongoing progress in the field, important challenges exist, associated with structural degradation due to volume expansion of electrode materials. This leads to rapid capacity fading, and must be resolved in order to move towards the practical use of high-performance LIBs with ultrafast cycling stability...
October 19, 2016: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Wei-Lin Wang, David Shechter
Chromatin, primarily a complex of DNA and histone proteins, is the physiological form of the genome. Chromatin is generally repressive for transcription and other information transactions that occur on DNA. A wealth of post-translational modifications on canonical histones and histone variants encode regulatory information to recruit or repel effector proteins on chromatin, promoting and further repressing transcription and thereby form the basis of epigenetic information. During metazoan oogenesis, large quantities of histone proteins are synthesized and stored in preparation for the rapid early cell cycles of development and to elicit maternal control of chromatin assembly pathways...
2016: International Journal of Developmental Biology
Ding Pan, Giulia Galli
Investigating the fate of dissolved carbon dioxide under extreme conditions is critical to understanding the deep carbon cycle in Earth, a process that ultimately influences global climate change. We used first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to study carbonates and carbon dioxide dissolved in water at pressures (P) and temperatures (T) approximating the conditions of Earth's upper mantle. Contrary to popular geochemical models assuming that molecular CO2(aq) is the major carbon species present in water under deep Earth conditions, we found that at 11 GPa and 1000 K, carbon exists almost entirely in the forms of solvated carbonate ([Formula: see text]) and bicarbonate ([Formula: see text]) ions and that even carbonic acid [H2CO3(aq)] is more abundant than CO2(aq)...
October 2016: Science Advances
Leonid Dubrovsky, Elliott Joseph Brea, Dmitry Pankov, Emily Casey, Tao Dao, Cheng Liu, David A Scheinberg
Specific immunotherapy for acute leukemia remains a great unmet need. Native unmodified monoclonal antibody therapies, while promising, are inadequately effective for these malignancies, and multiple mechanisms for failure have been described. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity or phagocytosis is the primary modality of mAb-mediated cell killing in vivo, but ultimately leads to relapse of the leukemias, in model systems and in humans. By use of a T-cell receptor mimic mAb ESKM, derived against a WT1 peptide expressed in complex with HLA-A*02:01, whose only mechanism of therapeutic action is ADCC, we evaluated the mechanisms of leukemic relapse from its potent therapeutic action in mouse xenograft models of human leukemia...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Peter S Hasenhuetl, Michael Freissmuth, Walter Sandtner
The plasmalemmal monoamine transporters clear the extracellular space from their cognate substrates and sustain cellular monoamine stores even during neuronal activity. In some instances, however, the transporters enter a substrate-exchange mode, which results in release of intracellular substrate. Understanding what determines the switch between these two transport modes demands time-resolved measurements of intracellular (co-)substrate-binding and -release. Here, we report an electrophysiological investigation of intracellular solute-binding to the human serotonin transporter (SERT) expressed in HEK-293 cells...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Oscar Prospéro-García, Octavio Amancio-Belmont, Alline L Becerril Meléndez, Alejandra E Ruiz-Contreras, Mónica Méndez-Díaz
Sleep is regulated by several brain structures, neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are a group of lipids with modulatory activity in the brain and bind mainly to cannabinoid receptors CB1R and CB2R, thereby modulating several brain functions, (memory, mood, food intake, pain perception). Oleoylethanolamide and palmitoylethanolamide belong to the N-acylethanolamides (NAEs) family, another type of active endogenous lipids. They bind to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α but not to CB1R, thereby modulating food satiety, inflammation and pain...
October 15, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Shu Zhang, Nancy Merino, Ning Wang, Ting Ruan, Xiaoxia Lu
Sediment microbial communities are responsible for many chemical biotransformation processes in the aquatic environment and play a critical role in various ecosystems and biogeochemical cycling. However, the impact of polyfluoroalkyl substances on sediment microbial communities remains unclear. These substances are increasingly being used in consumer and industrial products to replace environmentally persistent perfluoroalkyl substances. In this study, we investigated the effects of low (5mg/L) and high (15mg/L) doses of 6:2 fluorotelomer alcohol [6:2 FTOH, F(CF2)6CH2CH2OH] on the structure of a sediment microbial community...
October 15, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Stephen A Wood, Noah Sokol, Colin W Bell, Mark A Bradford, Shahid Naeem, Matthew D Wallenstein, Cheryl A Palm
Soil organic matter is critical to sustainable agriculture because it provides nutrients to crops as it decomposes and increases nutrient- and water-holding capacity when built up. Fast- and slow-cycling fractions of soil organic matter can have different impacts on crop production because fast-cycling fractions rapidly release nutrients for short-term plant growth and slow-cycling fractions bind nutrients that mineralize slowly and build up water-holding capacity. We explored the controls on these fractions in a tropical agroecosystem and their relationship to crop yields...
October 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Cédric Seignez, Mia Phillipson
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review describes the mechanisms by which neutrophils contribute to angiogenesis in hypoxic tissues during different conditions and diseases (e.g., menstrual cycle, wound healing, ischemic diseases, cancers), with particular focus on the recently described proangiogenic neutrophil subpopulation. RECENT FINDINGS: The importance of neutrophils in initiation of angiogenesis has been described during the past decade, and is believed to occur through release of the well-known proangiogenic factors Bv8, vascular endothelial growth factor A, and matrix metalloproteinase 9...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Hematology
Nicholas W Fischer, Aaron Prodeus, David Malkin, Jean Gariépy
Mutations in the oligomerization domain of p53 are genetically linked to cancer susceptibility in Li-Fraumeni Syndrome. These mutations typically alter the oligomeric state of p53 and impair its transcriptional activity. Activation of p53 through tetramerization is required for its tumor suppressive function by inducing transcriptional programs that lead to cell fate decisions such as cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. How p53 chooses between these cell fate outcomes remains unclear. Here, we use five oligomeric variants of p53, including two novel p53 constructs, that yield either monomeric, dimeric or tetrameric forms of p53 and demonstrate that they induce distinct cellular activities and gene expression profiles that lead to different cell fate outcomes...
October 18, 2016: Cell Cycle
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