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Reward based learning

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921068/voltage-sensitive-dye-imaging-of-mouse-neocortex-during-a-whisker-detection-task
#1
Alexandros Kyriakatos, Vijay Sadashivaiah, Yifei Zhang, Alessandro Motta, Matthieu Auffret, Carl C H Petersen
Sensorimotor processing occurs in a highly distributed manner in the mammalian neocortex. The spatiotemporal dynamics of electrical activity in the dorsal mouse neocortex can be imaged using voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) with near-millisecond temporal resolution and [Formula: see text] spatial resolution. Here, we trained mice to lick a water reward spout after a 1-ms deflection of the C2 whisker, and we imaged cortical dynamics during task execution with VSD RH1691. Responses to whisker deflection were highly dynamic and spatially highly distributed, exhibiting high variability from trial to trial in amplitude and spatiotemporal dynamics...
July 2017: Neurophotonics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920146/selectivity-in-post-encoding-connectivity-with-high-level-visual-cortex-is-associated-with-reward-motivated-memory
#2
Vishnu P Murty, Alexa Tompary, R Alison Adcock, Lila Davachi
: Reward motivation has been demonstrated to enhance declarative memory by facilitating systems level consolidation. While high reward information is often intermixed with lower reward information during an experience, memory for those experiences prioritizes high value information. How is this selectivity achieved? One possibility is that post-encoding consolidation processes bias memory strengthening to those representations associated with higher reward. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the influence of differential reward motivation on the selectivity of post-encoding markers of systems-level memory consolidation...
December 5, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909646/the-neural-mechanisms-of-meditative-practices-novel-approaches-for-healthy-aging
#3
REVIEW
Bianca P Acevedo, Sarah Pospos, Helen Lavretsky
OBJECTIVES: Meditation has been shown to have physical, cognitive, and psychological health benefits that can be used to promote healthy aging. However, the common and specific mechanisms of response remain elusive due to the diverse nature of mind-body practices. METHODS: In this review, we aim to compare the neural circuits implicated in focused-attention meditative practices that focus on present-moment awareness to those involved in active-type meditative practices (e...
2016: Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909102/the-attraction-effect-modulates-reward-prediction-errors-and-intertemporal-choices
#4
Sebastian Gluth, Jared M Hotaling, Jörg Rieskamp
: Classical economic theory contends that the utility of a choice option should be independent of other options. This view is challenged by the attraction effect, in which the relative preference between two options is altered by the addition of a third, asymmetrically dominated option. Here, we leveraged the attraction effect in the context of intertemporal choices to test whether both decisions and reward prediction errors (RPE)-in the absence of choice-violate the independence of irrelevant alternatives principle...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899725/why-good-teaching-evaluations-may-reward-bad-teaching-on-grade-inflation-and-other-unintended-consequences-of-student-evaluations
#5
Wolfgang Stroebe
In this article, I address the paradox that university grade point averages have increased for decades, whereas the time students invest in their studies has decreased. I argue that one major contributor to this paradox is grading leniency, encouraged by the practice of university administrators to base important personnel decisions on student evaluations of teaching. Grading leniency creates strong incentives for instructors to teach in ways that would result in good student evaluations. Because many instructors believe that the average student prefers courses that are entertaining, require little work, and result in high grades, they feel under pressure to conform to those expectations...
November 2016: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899333/abnormalities-of-brain-neural-circuits-related-to-obesity-a-diffusion-tensor-imaging-study
#6
Ioannis Papageorgiou, Loukas G Astrakas, Vassileios Xydis, George A Alexiou, Panagiotis Bargiotas, Loukia Tzarouchi, Anastasia K Zikou, Dimitrios N Kiortsis, Maria I Argyropoulou
PURPOSE: Increased Body-Mass-Index (BMI) has been associated with brain atrophy in both gray and white matter structures. However, little is known concerning the integrity of white matter tracts in obesity. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the pattern of changes in white matter microstructure in human adiposity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study included 268 participants (52 obese, 96 overweight and 120 normal-weight) that were retrospectively evaluated by Diffusion Tensor Imaging...
November 27, 2016: Magnetic Resonance Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893230/ecological-momentary-assessment-of-negative-symptoms-in-schizophrenia-relationships-to-effort-based-decision-making-and-reinforcement-learning
#7
Erin K Moran, Adam J Culbreth, Deanna M Barch
Negative symptoms are a core clinical feature of schizophrenia, but conceptual and methodological problems with current instruments can make their assessment challenging. One hypothesis is that current symptom assessments may be influenced by impairments in memory and may not be fully reflective of actual functioning outside of the laboratory. The present study sought to investigate the validity of assessing negative symptoms using ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Participants with schizophrenia (N = 31) completed electronic questionnaires on smartphones 4 times a day for 1 week...
November 28, 2016: Journal of Abnormal Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27882630/workplace-stress-burnout-and-coping-a-qualitative-study-of-the-experiences-of-australian-disability-support-workers
#8
Megan J Judd, Kate P Dorozenko, Lauren J Breen
Disability support workers (DSWs) are the backbone of contemporary disability support services and the interface through which disability philosophies and policies are translated into practical action. DSWs often experience workplace stress and burnout, resulting in a high turnover rate of employees within the non-professional disability service workforce. The full implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme in Australia is set to intensify the current challenges of attracting and retaining DSWs, as the role becomes characterised by greater demands, ambiguity and conflict...
November 23, 2016: Health & Social Care in the Community
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27877100/striatal-and-tegmental-neurons-code-critical-signals-for-temporal-difference-learning-of-state-value-in-domestic-chicks
#9
Chentao Wen, Yukiko Ogura, Toshiya Matsushima
To ensure survival, animals must update the internal representations of their environment in a trial-and-error fashion. Psychological studies of associative learning and neurophysiological analyses of dopaminergic neurons have suggested that this updating process involves the temporal-difference (TD) method in the basal ganglia network. However, the way in which the component variables of the TD method are implemented at the neuronal level is unclear. To investigate the underlying neural mechanisms, we trained domestic chicks to associate color cues with food rewards...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27874153/effects-of-personality-traits-on-collaborative-performance-in-problem-based-learning-tutorials
#10
Hye Won Jang, Seung Won Park
To examine the relationship between students' collaborative performance in a problem-based learning (PBL) environment and their personality traits. Methods:This retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted using student data of a PBL program between 2013 and 2014 at Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Eighty students were included in the study. Student data from the Temperament and Character Inventory were used as a measure of their personality traits. Peer evaluation scores during PBL were used as a measure of students' collaborative performance...
December 2016: Saudi Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872638/a-cognitive-model-based-on-neuromodulated-plasticity
#11
Jing Huang, Xiaogang Ruan, Naigong Yu, Qingwu Fan, Jiaming Li, Jianxian Cai
Associative learning, including classical conditioning and operant conditioning, is regarded as the most fundamental type of learning for animals and human beings. Many models have been proposed surrounding classical conditioning or operant conditioning. However, a unified and integrated model to explain the two types of conditioning is much less studied. Here, a model based on neuromodulated synaptic plasticity is presented. The model is bioinspired including multistored memory module and simulated VTA dopaminergic neurons to produce reward signal...
2016: Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870614/active-inference-a-process-theory
#12
Karl Friston, Thomas FitzGerald, Francesco Rigoli, Philipp Schwartenbeck, Giovanni Pezzulo
This article describes a process theory based on active inference and belief propagation. Starting from the premise that all neuronal processing (and action selection) can be explained by maximizing Bayesian model evidence-or minimizing variational free energy-we ask whether neuronal responses can be described as a gradient descent on variational free energy. Using a standard (Markov decision process) generative model, we derive the neuronal dynamics implicit in this description and reproduce a remarkable range of well-characterized neuronal phenomena...
November 21, 2016: Neural Computation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870610/neural-circuits-trained-with-standard-reinforcement-learning-can-accumulate-probabilistic-information-during-decision-making
#13
Nils Kurzawa, Christopher Summerfield, Rafal Bogacz
Much experimental evidence suggests that during decision making, neural circuits accumulate evidence supporting alternative options. A computational model well describing this accumulation for choices between two options assumes that the brain integrates the log ratios of the likelihoods of the sensory inputs given the two options. Several models have been proposed for how neural circuits can learn these log-likelihood ratios from experience, but all of these models introduced novel and specially dedicated synaptic plasticity rules...
November 21, 2016: Neural Computation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867436/putamen-activation-represents-an-intrinsic-positive-prediction-error-signal-for-visual-search-in-repeated-configurations
#14
Susanne Sommer, Stefan Pollmann
We investigated fMRI responses to visual search targets appearing at locations that were predicted by the search context. Based on previous work in visual category learning we expected an intrinsic reward prediction error signal in the putamen whenever the target appeared at a location that was predicted with some degree of uncertainty. Comparing target appearance at locations predicted with 50% probability to either locations predicted with 100% probability or unpredicted locations, increased activation was observed in left posterior putamen and adjacent left posterior insula...
2016: Open Neuroimaging Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859899/neural-signatures-of-trust-in-reciprocity-a-coordinate-based-meta-analysis
#15
Gabriele Bellucci, Sergey V Chernyak, Kimberly Goodyear, Simon B Eickhoff, Frank Krueger
Trust in reciprocity (TR) is defined as the risky decision to invest valued resources in another party with the hope of mutual benefit. Several fMRI studies have investigated the neural correlates of TR in one-shot and multiround versions of the investment game (IG). However, an overall characterization of the underlying neural networks remains elusive. Here, a coordinate-based meta-analysis was employed (activation likelihood estimation method, 30 articles) to investigate consistent brain activations in each of the IG stages (i...
November 17, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857886/effects-of-outcome-on-the-covariance-between-risk-level-and-brain-activity-in-adolescents-with-internet-gaming-disorder
#16
Xin Qi, Yongxin Yang, Shouping Dai, Peihong Gao, Xin Du, Yang Zhang, Guijin Du, Xiaodong Li, Quan Zhang
Individuals with internet gaming disorder (IGD) often have impaired risky decision-making abilities, and IGD-related functional changes have been observed during neuroimaging studies of decision-making tasks. However, it is still unclear how feedback (outcomes of decision-making) affects the subsequent risky decision-making in individuals with IGD. In this study, twenty-four adolescents with IGD and 24 healthy controls (HCs) were recruited and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing the balloon analog risk task (BART) to evaluate the effects of prior outcomes on brain activity during subsequent risky decision-making in adolescents with IGD...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852776/somatic-and-reinforcement-based-plasticity-in-the-initial-stages-of-human-motor-learning
#17
Ananda Sidarta, Shahabeddin Vahdat, Nicolò F Bernardi, David J Ostry
: As one learns to dance or play tennis, the desired somatosensory state is typically unknown. Trial and error is important as motor behavior is shaped by successful and unsuccessful movements. As an experimental model, we designed a task in which human participants make reaching movements to a hidden target and receive positive reinforcement when successful. We identified somatic and reinforcement-based sources of plasticity on the basis of changes in functional connectivity using resting-state fMRI before and after learning...
November 16, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852762/transcriptomic-analysis-of-instinctive-and-learned-reward-related-behaviors-in-honey-bees
#18
Nicholas L Naeger, Gene E Robinson
We used transcriptomics to compare instinctive and learned, reward-based honey bee behaviors with similar spatio-temporal components: mating flights by males (drones) and time-trained foraging flights by females (workers), respectively. Genome-wide gene expression profiling via RNA sequencing was performed on the mushroom bodies, a region of the brain known for multi-modal sensory integration and responsive to various types of reward. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with the onset of mating (623 genes) were enriched for the gene ontology (GO) categories of Transcription, Unfolded Protein Binding, Post-embryonic Development, and Neuron Differentiation...
November 15, 2016: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852020/-emotional-and-motivational-functions-of-the-prefrontal-cortex
#19
Masataka Watanabe
Patients with the damage to the orbital region of the prefrontal cortex and monkeys with lesions in this area show impairment in emotional and motivational behavior. They also have difficulty in the extinction of learned behavior and in the reversal learning. This brain area is concerned with not only the value estimation of reward and aversive stimuli but also the expectation of these stimuli. The lateral prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the integration of emotion/motivation and cognition. The medial prefrontal cortex is concerned with action selection based on the previous reward history...
November 2016: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852017/-cognitive-functions-in-the-prefrontal-association-cortex-transitive-inference-and-the-lateral-prefrontal-cortex
#20
Shingo Tanaka, Mineki Oguchi, Masamichi Sakagami
To behave appropriately in a complex and uncertain world, the brain makes use of several distinct learning systems. One such system is called the "model-free process", via which conditioning allows the association between a stimulus or response and a given reward to be learned. Another system is called the "model-based process". Via this process, the state transition between a stimulus and a response is learned so that the brain is able to plan actions prior to their execution. Several studies have tried to relate the difference between model-based and model-free processes to the difference in functions of the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and the striatum...
November 2016: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
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