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Shingles vaccine

William Simonson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 13, 2018: Geriatric Nursing
Amro Ali, Malka Davina Kirschenbaum, Sansar Sharma, Thaddeus L Wandel
PURPOSE: To the best of our knowledge, we present a rare case report describing an occurrence of acute retinal necrosis in an otherwise healthy individual who received the shingles vaccine. METHODS: Observational case report. PATIENT: A 63-year-old healthy and immunocompetent white man presented with change of vision in the left eye after blunt trauma. A diagnosis of corneal abrasion was made. During follow-up, a detailed history discovered a progressive deterioration in vision over the past few weeks...
March 8, 2018: Retinal Cases & Brief Reports
Geraldine Miller, Heidi Schaefer, Sandra Yoder, Rachel Miller, Patricia Winokur, Karen Kotloff, David Klassen, Michael Wierzbicki, Cyrille Amegashie, Kathryn Edwards
BACKGROUND: Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk for reactivation of herpes zoster, or shingles, and have a higher frequency of serious complications including post-herpetic neuralgia. A live, attenuated shingles vaccine is effective and approved for individuals 50 years and older. The vaccine is contraindicated following transplantation but may be used in patients with renal failure. Utilization of the vaccine has been poor in patients with end-stage renal disease, including those awaiting transplant, due to concerns for safety, efficacy, and potential sensitization prior to transplant...
March 7, 2018: Transplant Infectious Disease: An Official Journal of the Transplantation Society
Doug Campos-Outcalt
The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made relatively few new vaccine recommendations in 2017. One pertained to prevention of hepatitis B virus infection in infants born to HBV-infected mothers. Another recommended a new vaccine to prevent shingles. A third advised considering an additional dose of mumps vaccine during an outbreak.
March 2018: Journal of Family Practice
Christopher D Conrady, Richard M Feist, Alison Crum
Purpose: Orbital myositis is characterized by pain with eye movements, gaze restriction, diplopia, and enlargement of extraocular muscles on imaging. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is an extremely rare cause of the disease in the elderly and has never been reported in a patient younger than forty-five years old such as the adolescent described herein. We present this case to raise awareness of an entity that will likely become more prevalent due to current vaccine strategies. Observation: We present the case of a 13-year-old girl with VZV-associated orbital myositis and meningitis that had a quick and complete recovery following IV acyclovir and oral steroids...
April 2017: American Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports
Giulia Freer, Mauro Pistello
Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is the etiologic agent of varicella (chicken pox), a childhood exanthematic disease that develops as a result of primary infection, and zoster (shingles), caused by reactivation of the virus persisting in a latent form in the dorsal sensory ganglia. Although varicella is generally a mild self-limiting illness, in immunocompromised subjects and adults it can have a serious clinical course that can lead to permanent damage of the central nervous system. In these and in most zoster cases, treatment with anti-herpetic drugs and/or immunotherapy is necessary...
March 2, 2018: New Microbiologica
Michele B Kaufman
Zoster vaccine recombinant, adjuvanted (Shingrix) for the prevention of shingles in adults; angiotensin II injection (Giapreza) to increase blood pressure in adults with septic or other distributive shock; and glycopyrrolate inhalation solution (Lonhala Magnair) for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
March 2018: P & T: a Peer-reviewed Journal for Formulary Management
Stephanie F James, Elias B Chahine, Allana J Sucher, Cassandra Hanna
OBJECTIVES: To review the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of the herpes zoster subunit vaccine (HZ/su) for use in adult patients for the prevention of shingles. DATA SOURCES: A literature search through PubMed was conducted (June 2008 to October 2017) using the terms shingles vaccine and varicella zoster virus. References from retrieved articles and the prescribing information were also reviewed for any additional material. STUDY SELECTION/DATA EXTRACTION: The literature search was limited to human studies published in English...
February 1, 2018: Annals of Pharmacotherapy
Aaron Saguil, Shawn Kane, Michael Mercado, Rebecca Lauters
Herpes zoster, or shingles, is caused by reactivation of varicella zoster virus, which causes chickenpox. There are an estimated 1 million cases in the Unites States annually, with an individual lifetime risk of 30%. Patients with conditions that decrease cell-mediated immunity are 20 to 100 times more likely to develop herpes zoster. Patients may present with malaise, headache, low-grade fever, and abnormal skin sensations for two to three days before the classic maculopapular rash appears. The rash is usually unilateral, confined to a single dermatome, and typically progresses to clear vesicles that become cloudy and crust over in seven to 10 days...
November 15, 2017: American Family Physician
Eduardo de Gomensoro, Giuseppe Del Giudice, T Mark Doherty
Life-long primary prevention interventions beginning and continuing throughout an individual's lifetime are increasingly seen as key to meeting the global healthcare challenges that accompany demographic changes - a concept referred to as "Healthy aging". In this perspective, vaccination is seen as part of a triad, together with healthy diet and exercise. Current adult vaccine coverage is lower than target vaccination rates in most developed countries, and so vaccine preventable diseases continue to present a substantial burden on health and healthcare resources, especially in older individuals...
January 16, 2018: Annals of Medicine
Seok Cheon Kim, Youn Hee Won, Ji Seon Park, Jeong Seon Jeon, Jin Hyun Ahn, Moon Jung Song, Ok Sarah Shin, Chan Hee Lee
Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent for chickenpox and shingles. Comparative genomic sequence analysis of clinical and vaccine strains suggested potential sites responsible for attenuation. In this study, low and high passages of two VZV clinical strains cultured in human fibroblast cells were compared for genomic DNA sequences and growth characteristics. Mutations were detected at 187 and 162 sites in the strain YC01 and YC02, respectively. More than 86% of mutations were found in open reading frames, and ORF62 exhibited highest frequency of mutations...
February 2, 2018: Virus Research
Alexsia L Richards, Patricia J Sollars, Jared D Pitts, Austin M Stults, Ekaterina E Heldwein, Gary E Pickard, Gregory A Smith
A hallmark property of the neurotropic alpha-herpesvirinae is the dissemination of infection to sensory and autonomic ganglia of the peripheral nervous system following an initial exposure at mucosal surfaces. The peripheral ganglia serve as the latent virus reservoir and the source of recurrent infections such as cold sores (herpes simplex virus type I) and shingles (varicella zoster virus). However, the means by which these viruses routinely invade the nervous system is not fully understood. We report that an internal virion component, the pUL37 tegument protein, has a surface region that is an essential neuroinvasion effector...
December 2017: PLoS Pathogens
Jana Shaw, Anne A Gershon
Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is the cause of chickenpox (varicella) and shingles (zoster), and was once responsible for over 4 million infections in the United States annually. The development of a live attenuated VZV vaccine was initially viewed with extreme skepticism. Nonetheless, a VZV vaccine was developed in the 1970s by Takahashi and his colleagues in Japan and was eventually licensed in the US. It is now known to be one of the safest and most effective vaccines available and is administered worldwide...
November 27, 2017: Viral Immunology
Lin Pan, Nitesh Singh, Ruth Cannon, Joe Fawke, Julian W Tang
We present an unusual case of varicella zoster (VZ) virus IgG negative, yet clinically apparent, maternal shingles, which prompted the administration of VZ immunoglobulin to the newborn. The mother had no previous VZ vaccination. Eleven days later the baby developed a primary VZ infection, with only mild disease, likely as a result of the VZ immunoglobulin. The variable sensitivity of VZV IgG-specific assays is well-recognized. Thus, the ability of this particular VZV IgG assay to detect both maternal and infant VZV IgG, post-natally, suggests that the earlier VZV IgG negative results were due to lower circulating levels of maternal antibody...
April 2018: Journal of Medical Virology
Phuc Le, Michael B Rothberg
INTRODUCTION: The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends a single dose of the live attenuated herpes zoster vaccine in people aged ≥60 years. Because vaccine-induced protection decreases to zero after 10 years, many vaccinated people will soon be subject to an increased risk of the disease. The study objective was to determine the cost effectiveness of a herpes zoster vaccine booster and its optimal timing among immunocompetent adults first vaccinated at aged ≥60 years...
December 2017: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Bruce M McDonald, Douglas C Dover, Kimberley A Simmonds, Christopher A Bell, Lawrence W Svenson, Margaret L Russell
PURPOSE: We assessed the effectiveness of shingles vaccine in preventing incident shingles among Alberta residents aged 50 years or older over the period 2009 - 2015, using administrative health data. METHODS: The cohort comprised of Albertans from the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan Registry (AHCIP) as of June 30, 2009 and aged 50 years or older. Those who received shingles vaccine were identified from the provincial pharmaceutical information network. The occurrence of incident shingles was identified through both inpatient and outpatients/community care data...
December 15, 2017: Vaccine
Tomohiko Sadaoka, Cindi L Schwartz, Labchan Rajbhandari, Arun Venkatesan, Jeffrey I Cohen
Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is highly cell-associated when grown in culture and has a much higher (4,000 to 20,000-fold increased) particle-to-plaque forming unit (PFU) ratio in vitro than herpes simplex virus (HSV). In contrast, VZV is highly infectious in vivo by airborne transmission. Neurons are major targets for VZV in vivo, in which the virus can establish latency and reactivate to produce infectious virus. Using neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and cell-free wild-type (WT) VZV, we demonstrate that neurons are nearly 100 times more permissive for WT VZV infection than very early passage human embryonic lung cells or MRC-5 diploid human fibroblasts, the cells used for vaccine production or virus isolation...
October 18, 2017: Journal of Virology
Ali Manouchehrinia, Radu Tanasescu, Huner Kareem, Oltita P Jerca, Fouzia Jabeen, Rachelle Shafei, Judith Breuer, Keith Neal, William Irving, Cris S Constantinescu
Varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection has been implicated in multiple sclerosis (MS), but direct causal involvement has been disputed. Nevertheless, knowledge of VZV exposure is important, given the risk of serious complications of first exposure while undergoing immunosuppressive treatment, in particular with fingolimod. We distributed questionnaires to MS clinic patients, requesting information about history of chickenpox, sibling/household/occupational exposure, history of zoster (shingles), and disease-modifying treatment...
September 11, 2017: Journal of Neurovirology
L Jin, S Xu, P A C Maple, W Xu, K E Brown
Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection (chickenpox) results in latency and subsequent reactivation manifests as shingles. Effective attenuated vaccines (vOka) are available for prevention of both illnesses. In this study, an amplicon-based sequencing method capable of differentiating between VZV wild-type (wt) strains and vOka vaccine is described. A total of 44 vesicular fluid specimens collected from 43 patients (16 from China and 27 from the UK) with either chickenpox or shingles were investigated, of which 10 had received previous vaccination...
September 2017: Epidemiology and Infection
Tina Norris, Anjel Vahratian, Robin A Cohen
Data from the National Health Interview Survey ? Among adults aged 65 and over, more than two-thirds had an influenza vaccine in the past 12 months (69.0%). ? More than one in two adults aged 65 and over had a tetanus vaccine in the past 10 years (56.9%). ? More than 6 of 10 adults aged 65 and over had ever had a pneumococcal vaccine (63.6%), while a little more than one-third had ever had a shingles vaccine (34.2%). ? Among adults aged 65 and over, vaccination coverage was highest for non-Hispanic white adults compared with non- Hispanic black and Hispanic adults...
June 2017: NCHS Data Brief
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