keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Uremic toxins

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28643674/microbiological-and-serological-control-of-escherichia-coli-o157-h7-in-kindergarten-staff-in-buenos-aires-city-and-suburban-areas
#1
Romina J Fernández-Brando, María Marta Amaral, Andrés E Ciocchini, Leticia V Bentancor, Jorge A Trelles, Marcelo Da Rocha, Martín Landriel, Mariana Ugarte, Gabriel Briones, Cristina Ibarra, Marina S Palermo
Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections are implicated in the development of the life-threatening hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Despite the magnitude of the social and economic problems caused by HUS, no licensed vaccine or effective therapy is currently available for human use. Prevention of STEC infections continues being the most important measure to reduce HUS incidence. This is especially true for Argentina where HUS incidence among children is extremely high and shows an endemic pattern...
2017: Medicina
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636168/improved-hemodialysis-with-hemocompatible-polyethersulfone-hollow-fiber-membranes-in-vitro-performance
#2
Surendra Kumar Verma, Akshay Modi, Atul Kumar Singh, Rohit Teotia, Jayesh Bellare
We show that addition of nanozeolite (NZ) and vitamin E D-α-Tocopherol polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS or T) considerably improves the performance of polyethersulfone (PES or P) hollow fiber membrane (HFM) for hemodialysis. Nanocomposite HFMs were manufactured using PES as a polymer, TPGS as an additive and NZ as a filler to give a composite membrane called PT-NZ. HFMs were spun by dry-wet spinning principle based on liquid-liquid phase separation. TPGS and NZ were successfully incorporated in HFMs, as confirmed by EDX elemental mapping...
June 21, 2017: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B, Applied Biomaterials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623542/identification-of-differentially-expressed-mirnas-associated-with-chronic-kidney-disease-mineral-bone-disorder
#3
Kyung Im Kim, Sohyun Jeong, Nayoung Han, Jung Mi Oh, Kook-Hwan Oh, In-Wha Kim
The purpose of this study is to characterize a meta-signature of differentially expressed mRNA in chronic kidney disease (CKD) to predict putative microRNA (miRNA) in CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) and confirm the changes in these genes and miRNA expression under uremic conditions by using a cell culture system. PubMed searches using MeSH terms and keywords related to CKD, uremia, and mRNA arrays were conducted. Through a computational analysis, a meta-signature that characterizes the significant intersection of differentially expressed mRNA and expected miRNAs associated with CKD-MBD was determined...
June 14, 2017: Frontiers of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614372/intestinal-organoids-model-human-responses-to-infection-by-commensal-and-shiga-toxin-producing-escherichia-coli
#4
Sayali S Karve, Suman Pradhan, Doyle V Ward, Alison A Weiss
Infection with Shiga toxin (Stx) producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 can cause the potentially fatal complication hemolytic uremic syndrome, and currently only supportive therapy is available. Lack of suitable animal models has hindered study of this disease. Induced human intestinal organoids (iHIOs), generated by in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, represent differentiated human intestinal tissue. We show that iHIOs with addition of human neutrophils can model E. coli intestinal infection and innate cellular responses...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28608457/potential-therapeutic-interventions-for-chronic-kidney-disease-associated-sarcopenia-via-indoxyl-sulfate-induced-mitochondrial-dysfunction
#5
Yuki Enoki, Hiroshi Watanabe, Riho Arake, Rui Fujimura, Kana Ishiodori, Tadashi Imafuku, Kento Nishida, Ryusei Sugimoto, Saori Nagao, Shigeyuki Miyamura, Yu Ishima, Motoko Tanaka, Kazutaka Matsushita, Hirotaka Komaba, Masafumi Fukagawa, Masaki Otagiri, Toru Maruyama
BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients experience skeletal muscle wasting and decreased exercise endurance. Our previous study demonstrated that indoxyl sulfate (IS), a uremic toxin, accelerates skeletal muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to examine the issue of whether IS causes mitochondria dysfunction and IS-targeted intervention using AST-120, which inhibits IS accumulation, or mitochondria-targeted intervention using L-carnitine or teneligliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor which retains mitochondria function and alleviates skeletal muscle atrophy and muscle endurance in chronic kidney disease mice...
June 12, 2017: Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28596556/indoxyl-sulfate-is-mediated-immune-dysfunction-provokes-endothelial-damage-in-patients-with-end-stage-renal-disease-esrd
#6
Hee Young Kim, Tae-Hyun Yoo, Yuri Hwang, Ga Hye Lee, Bonah Kim, Jiyeon Jang, Hee Tae Yu, Min Chang Kim, Joo-Youn Cho, Chan Joo Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Sungha Park, Won-Woo Lee
Progressive renal failure causes uremia-related immune dysfunction, which features a chronic inflammatory milieu. Given the central role of end-stage renal disease (ESRD)-related immune dysfunction in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), much attention has been focused on how uremic toxins affect cellular immunity and the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in ESRD patients. Here, we investigated the characteristics of monocytes and CD4(+) T cells in ESRD patients and the immune responses induced by indoxyl sulfate (IS), a key uremic toxin, in order to explore the pathogenic effects of these cells on vascular endothelial cells...
June 8, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28578339/erythrocyte-sodium-sensitivity-and-eryptosis-in-chronic-hemodialysis-patients
#7
Anna Meyring-Wösten, Viktoriya Kuntsevich, Israel Campos, Schantel Williams, Jie Ma, Samir Patel, Chiarra Ornillo, Stephan Thijssen, Peter Kotanko
BACKGROUND/AIMS: In hemodialysis (HD) patients the endothelial and erythrocyte glycocalyx is impaired which in turn correlates with elevated erythrocyte sodium sensitivity (ESS). Additionally, apoptotic erythrocyte death (eryptosis), characterized by phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on the cell surface, is increased in this population. We aimed to explore the relationship of ESS and eryptosis. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 11 healthy controls and 20 chronic HD patients before and after midweek HD...
2017: Kidney & Blood Pressure Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573386/uremic-toxicity-and-bone-in-ckd
#8
REVIEW
Suguru Yamamoto, Masafumi Fukagawa
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially those on dialysis treatment, are at high risk of bone fracture. In CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD), secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with advanced CKD induces bone abnormalities, and skeletal resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH) starts in the early stages of kidney disease. Uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulfate and p-cresyl sulfate reduce the expression of PTH receptor as well as PTH-induced cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate production in osteoblasts...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556931/quantification-of-carbamylated-albumin-in-serum-based-on-capillary-electrophoresis
#9
Sigurd Delanghe, Alena Moerman, Anneleen Pletinck, Eva Schepers, Griet Glorieux, Wim Van Biesen, Joris R Delanghe, Marijn M Speeckaert
Protein carbamylation, a nonenzymatic posttranslational modification promoted during uremia, is linked to a poor prognosis. In the present study, carbamylation of serum albumin was assayed using the symmetry factor on a capillary electrophoresis instrument (Helena V8). The symmetry factor has been defined as the distance from the center line of the peak to the back slope, divided by the distance from the center line of the peak to the front slope, with all measurements made at 10% of the maximum peak height...
May 30, 2017: Electrophoresis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28554992/dialysis-procedures-alter-metabolic-conditions
#10
REVIEW
Bernd Stegmayr
A progressive chronic kidney disease results in retention of various substances that more or less contribute to dysfunction of various metabolic systems. The accumulated substances are denominated uremic toxins. Although many toxins remain undetected, numerous newly defined toxins participate in the disturbance of food breakdown. In addition, toxic effects may downregulate other pathways, resulting in a reduced ability of free fatty acid breakdown by lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (HL). Dialysis may even worsen metabolic functions...
May 27, 2017: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28553032/stroke-in-patients-with-chronic-kidney-disease%C3%A2-how-do-we-approach-and-manage-it
#11
REVIEW
S Nayak-Rao, M P Shenoy
Renal failure is a potent risk factor for stroke, which is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The risk of stroke is 5-30 times higher in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially on dialysis. Case fatality rates are also higher reaching almost 90%. It is therefore important to understand the factors that predispose to stroke in this vulnerable population to better apply preventive strategies. The heightened risk of stroke in CKD represents the interplay of the vascular co-morbidities that occur with renal impairment and factors specific to renal failure such as malnutrition-inflammation-atherosclerosis complex, the effect of uremic toxins, dialysis techniques, vascular access, and the use of anticoagulants to maintain flow in the extracorporeal circuit...
May 2017: Indian Journal of Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542036/a-survey-of-renal-impairment-pharmacokinetic-studies-for-new-oncology-drug-approvals-in-the-usa-from-2010-to-early-2015-a-focus-on-development-strategies-and-future-directions
#12
Jim J Xiao, Jiyun S Chen, Bert L Lum, Richard A Graham
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a guidance document in 2010 on pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in renal impairment (RI) on the basis of observations that substances such as uremic toxins might result in altered drug metabolism and excretion. No specific recommendations for oncology drugs were included. We surveyed the publicly available FDA review documents of 29 small molecule oncology drugs approved between 2010 and the first quarter of 2015. The objectives were as follows: (i) summarize the impact of RI on PK at the time of the initial new drug application; (ii) identify limitations of the guidance; and (iii) outline an integrated approach to study the impact of RI on these drugs...
May 24, 2017: Anti-cancer Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28537846/uremic-toxins-affect-the-imbalance-of-redox-state-and-overexpression-of-prolyl-hydroxylase-2-in-human-adipose-tissue-derived-mesenchymal-stem-cells-involved-in-wound-healing
#13
Vuong Cat Khanh, Kinuko Ohneda, Toshiki Kato, Toshiharu Yamashita, Fujio Sato, Kana Tachi, Osamu Ohneda
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in a delay in wound healing because of its complications such as uremia, anemia, and fluid overload. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to be a candidate for wound healing because of the ability to recruit many types of cells. However, it is still unclear whether the CKD-adipose tissue-derived MSCs (CKD-AT-MSCs) have the same function in wound healing as healthy donor-derived normal AT-MSCs (nAT-MSCs). In this study, we found that uremic toxins induced elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) expression in nAT-MSCs, resulting in the reduced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) under hypoxic conditions...
May 24, 2017: Stem Cells and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535525/expanded-hemodialysis-a-new-therapy-for-a-new-class-of-membranes
#14
Claudio Ronco, Gaetano La Manna
A wide spectrum of molecules is retained in end-stage kidney disease, normally defined as uremic toxins. These solutes have different molecular weights and radii. Current dialysis membranes and techniques only remove solutes in the range of 50-15,000 Da, with limited or no capability to remove solutes in the middle to high molecular weight range (up to 50,000 Da). Improved removal has been obtained with high cut-off (HCO) membranes, with albumin loss representing a limitation to their practical application...
2017: Contributions to Nephrology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535204/colocalization-of-receptors-for-shiga-toxins-with-lipid-rafts-in-primary-human-renal-glomerular-endothelial-cells-and-influence-of-d-pdmp-on-synthesis-and-distribution-of-glycosphingolipid-receptors
#15
Nadine Legros, Gottfried Pohlentz, Jana Runde, Stefanie Dusny, Hans-Ulrich Humpf, Helge Karch, Johannes Müthing
Damage of human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) of the kidney represents the linchpin in the pathogenesis of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) caused by Shiga toxins (Stxs) of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We performed a comprehensive structural analysis of the Stx receptor glycosphingolipids (GSLs) globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer, Galα4alβ4Glcβ1Cer) and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4Cer, GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer) and their distribution in lipid raft analogue detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) and nonDRMs prepared from primary HRGECs...
May 23, 2017: Glycobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28534196/in-silico-analysis-of-shiga-toxins-stxs-to-identify-new-potential-vaccine-targets-for-shiga-toxin-producing-escherichia-coli
#16
Maryam Golshani, Mana Oloomi, Saeid Bouzari
Shiga toxins belong to a family of structurally and functionally related toxins serving as the main virulence factors for pathogenicity of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) associating with Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). At present, there is no effective treatment or prevention for HUS. The aim of the present study was to find conserved regions within the amino acid sequences of Stx1, Stx2 (Shiga toxin) and their variants. In this regard, In-silico identification of conformational continuous B cell and T-cell epitopes was performed in order to introduce new potential vaccine candidates...
December 2016: In Silico Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28529915/hemolytic-uremic-syndrome-in-adults-a-case-report
#17
Fabiel Gerardo Pérez-Cruz, Patricia Villa-Díaz, María Consuelo Pintado-Delgado, María Loreto Fernández Rodríguez, Ana Blasco-Martínez, María Pérez-Fernández
Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA) are microvascular occlusive disorders characterized by platelet aggregation and mechanical damage to erythrocytes, clinically characterized by microangiopatic haemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and organ injury. We are reporting a case of a woman patient with severe hemolytic uremic syndrome associated to infectious diarrhoea caused by Shiga toxin-producing pathogen, who were admitted to our intensive care unit. The patient described developed as organ injury, neurological failure and acute renal failure, with need of haemodialysis technique...
May 4, 2017: World Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28528271/exploring-binding-characteristics-and-the-related-competition-of-different-protein-bound-uremic-toxins
#18
Olivier Deltombe, Henriette de Loor, Griet Glorieux, Annemieke Dhondt, Wim Van Biesen, Björn Meijers, Sunny Eloot
Little is known about potential differences in binding characteristics of protein-bound uremic toxins (PBUTs) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) versus healthy controls. The question arises whether eventual differences are attributed to (i) the elevated levels of competing uremic toxins, and/or (ii) post-translational modifications of albumin. We evaluated the binding characteristics of hippuric acid (HA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indoxyl sulfate (IS), and p-cresylsulfate (pCS) by deriving a binding curve in three distinct conditions: (i) serum from healthy controls (healthy serum), (ii) blank serum from hemodialysis patients (blank HD serum; i...
May 17, 2017: Biochimie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28524108/-uremic-toxin-section-in-the-journal-toxins-a-powerful-tool-to-bundle-and-advance-knowledge-on-uremia
#19
EDITORIAL
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28501302/measuring-the-patient-response-to-dialysis-therapy-hemodiafiltration-and-clinical-trials
#20
Mark R Marshall
There is a strong biological plausibility for benefit from removal of larger uremic toxins and increasing positive clinical experience with hemodiafiltration. However, evidence supporting hemodiafiltration is not definitive with studies that are often limited by serious methodological shortcomings. Morena et al. show that hemodiafiltration may prevent intradialytic hypotension, albeit in a study that also has some shortcomings. Ongoing research for hemodiafiltration is still needed through high-quality clinical trials that adhere to standards for clinical trial conduct and reporting...
June 2017: Kidney International
keyword
keyword
106512
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"