keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Intranasal fentanyl

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535115/use-of-naloxone-nasal-spray-4%C3%A2-mg-in-the-community-setting-a-survey-of-use-by-community-organizations
#1
George K Avetian, Phillip Fiuty, Silvana Mazzella, Dave Koppa, Vivian Heye, Pratibha Hebbar
OBJECTIVE: Naloxone hydrochloride, an opioid antagonist, has been approved as a concentrated 4-mg dose intranasal formulation for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. This new formulation is easier to use and contains a higher dose of naloxone compared with earlier, unapproved kits. A survey of first responders and community-based organizations was conducted to understand initial real-world experiences with this new formulation for opioid overdose reversal. METHODS: In August 2016, 152 US organizations known to have received units of the approved 4-mg dose/unit naloxone nasal spray (NARCAN® Nasal Spray 4 mg [NNS]; Adapt Pharma, Inc...
May 23, 2017: Current Medical Research and Opinion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28460806/fracture-reduction-in-the-ed-and-intranasal-fentanyl-50mcg-ml-in-children
#2
P Hallas, J Cordtz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 27, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28411530/the-influence-of-intrapartum-opioid-use-on-breastfeeding-experience-at-6-weeks-post-partum-a-secondary-analysis
#3
Julie-Anne Fleet, Meril Jones, Ingrid Belan
OBJECTIVE: To examine breastfeeding experiences up to 6 weeks postpartum for mothers administered intranasal fentanyl, subcutaneous fentanyl or intramuscular pethidine for intrapartum analgesia. DESIGN: A secondary analysis was undertaken using the per-protocol dataset to examine the third phase of a larger randomised controlled trial. This phase of the study examined breastfeeding intention and experience from the first hour of birth to 6 weeks postpartum. Medical records were audited and women were contacted at 6 weeks postpartum to complete a telephone questionnaire...
April 3, 2017: Midwifery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366351/when-to-pick-the-nose-out-of-hospital-and-emergency-department-intranasal-administration-of-medications
#4
REVIEW
Megan A Rech, Brian Barbas, Whitney Chaney, Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Charles Turck
The intranasal route for medication administration is increasingly popular in the emergency department and out-of-hospital setting because such administration is simple and fast, and can be used for patients without intravenous access and in situations in which obtaining an intravenous line is difficult or time intensive (eg, for patients who are seizing or combative). Several small studies (mostly pediatric) have shown midazolam to be effective for procedural sedation, anxiolysis, and seizures. Intranasal fentanyl demonstrates both safety and efficacy for the management of acute pain...
March 25, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259526/review-of-intranasally-administered-medications-for-use-in-the-emergency-department
#5
Abby M Bailey, Regan A Baum, Karolyn Horn, Tameka Lewis, Kate Morizio, Amy Schultz, Kyle Weant, Stephanie N Justice
BACKGROUND: Intranasal (IN) medication delivery is a viable alternative to other routes of administration, including intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration. The IN route bypasses the risk of needle-stick injuries and alleviates the emotional trauma that may arise from the insertion of an IV catheter. OBJECTIVE: This review aims to evaluate published literature on medications administered via the IN route that are applicable to practice in emergency medicine...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28243139/an-observational-feasibility-study-to-assess-the-safety-and-effectiveness-of-intranasal-fentanyl-for-radiofrequency-ablations-of-the-lumbar-facet-joints
#6
Michael W Bartoszek, Amy McCoart, Kyung-Soo Jason Hong, Chelsey Haley, Krista Beth Highland, Anthony R Plunkett
PURPOSE: The purpose of the present observational, feasibility study is to assess the preliminary safety and effectiveness of intranasal fentanyl for lumbar facet radiofrequency ablation procedures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This cohort observational study included 23 adult patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, heart rate, oxygen saturation percent, Pasero Opioid-Induced Sedation Scale score, and the Defense and Veterans Pain Rating Scale pain score were assessed prior to the procedure and intranasal fentanyl (100 μg) administration and every 15 minutes after administration, up to 60 minutes post administration...
2017: Journal of Pain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28190665/intranasal-fentanyl-and-inhaled-nitrous-oxide-for-fracture-reduction-the-fan-observational-study
#7
J Hoeffe, E Doyon Trottier, B Bailey, D Shellshear, M Lagacé, C Sutter, G Grimard, R Cook, F E Babl
INTRODUCTION: Procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) are frequently used for fracture reduction in pediatric emergency departments (ED). Combining intranasal (IN) fentanyl with inhalation of nitrous oxide (N2O) allow for short recovery time and obviates painful and time-consuming IV access insertions. METHODS: We performed a bicentric, prospective, observational cohort study. Patients aged 4-18years were included if they received combined PSA with IN fentanyl and N2O for the reduction of mildly/moderately displaced fracture or of dislocation...
January 5, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28121974/intranasal-analgesia-and-sedation-in-pediatric-emergency-care-a-prospective-observational-study-on-the-implementation-of-an-institutional-protocol-in-a-tertiary-children-s-hospital
#8
Marcus Nemeth, Nils Jacobsen, Carsten Bantel, Melanie Fieler, Robert Sümpelmann, Christoph Eich
OBJECTIVES: Children presenting with acute traumatic pain or in need of therapeutic or diagnostic procedures require rapid and effective analgesia and/or sedation. Intranasal administration (INA) promises to be a reliable, minimally invasive delivery route. However, INA is still underused in Germany. We hence developed a protocol for acute pain therapy (APT) and urgent analgesia and/or sedation (UAS). Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of our protocol. METHODS: We performed a prospective observational study in a tertiary children's hospital in Germany...
January 24, 2017: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27862905/intranasal-fentanyl-for-initial-treatment-of-vaso-occlusive-crisis-in-sickle-cell-disease
#9
Daniel M Fein, Jeffrey R Avner, Kathryn Scharbach, Deepa Manwani, Hnin Khine
BACKGROUND: Analgesia administration for children with vaso-occlusive crises is often delayed in the emergency department. Intranasal fentanyl (INF) has been shown to be safe and effective in providing rapid analgesia for other painful conditions. Our objective was to determine if children with a vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) who received initial treatment with INF compared to placebo achieved a greater decrease in pain score after 20 min. PROCEDURE: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial...
June 2017: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27625351/intranasal-opioid-administration-in-rhesus-monkeys-pet-imaging-and-antinociception
#10
Phillip A Saccone, Angela M Lindsey, Robert A Koeppe, Kathy A Zelenock, Xia Shao, Phillip Sherman, Carole A Quesada, James H Woods, Peter J H Scott
The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of intranasally administered opioids in rhesus monkeys using the tail-withdrawal assay, and to correlate these effects with measures of receptor occupancy using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Initial experiments characterized the antinociceptive effects of intranasal (IN) fentanyl and buprenorphine relative to intramuscular (IM) injection. Fentanyl (0.010-0.032 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) produced dose-dependent increases in tail-withdrawal latency that did not differ between routes of delivery...
November 2016: Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27609854/study-protocol-of-a-randomised-controlled-trial-of-intranasal-ketamine-compared-with-intranasal-fentanyl-for-analgesia-in-children-with-suspected-isolated-extremity-fractures-in-the-paediatric-emergency-department
#11
Stacy L Reynolds, Jonathan R Studnek, Kathleen Bryant, Kelly VanderHave, Eric Grossman, Charity G Moore, James Young, Melanie Hogg, Michael S Runyon
INTRODUCTION: Fentanyl is the most widely studied intranasal (IN) analgesic in children. IN subdissociative (INSD) ketamine may offer a safe and efficacious alternative to IN fentanyl and may decrease overall opioid use during the emergency department (ED) stay. This study examines the feasibility of a larger, multicentre clinical trial comparing the safety and efficacy of INSD ketamine to IN fentanyl and the potential role for INSD ketamine in reducing total opioid medication usage. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This double-blind, randomised controlled, pilot trial will compare INSD ketamine (1 mg/kg) to IN fentanyl (1...
September 8, 2016: BMJ Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27411064/multicenter-evaluation-of-prehospital-opioid-pain-management-in-injured-children
#12
Lorin R Browne, Manish I Shah, Jonathan R Studnek, Daniel G Ostermayer, Stacy Reynolds, Clare E Guse, David C Brousseau, E Brooke Lerner
BACKGROUND: The National Association of Emergency Medical Services Physicians' (NAEMSP) Position Statement on Prehospital Pain Management and the joint National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) Evidence-based Guideline for Prehospital Analgesia in Trauma aim to improve the recognition, assessment, and treatment of prehospital pain. The impact of implementation of these guidelines on pain management in children by emergency medical services (EMS) agencies has not been assessed...
November 2016: Prehospital Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27387971/randomized-trial-of-intranasal-fentanyl-versus-intravenous-morphine-for-abscess-incision-and-drainage
#13
Daniel B Fenster, Peter S Dayan, John Babineau, Linda Aponte-Patel, Daniel S Tsze
OBJECTIVES: Abscess incision and drainage (I&D) are painful and distressing procedures in children. Intranasal (IN) fentanyl is an effective analgesic for reducing symptomatic pain associated with fractures and burns but has not been studied for reducing procedural pain during abscess I&D. Our objective was to compare the analgesic efficacy of IN fentanyl with intravenous (IV) morphine for abscess I&D in children. METHODS: We performed a randomized noninferiority trial in children aged 4 to 18 years undergoing abscess I&D in a pediatric emergency department...
July 12, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27334130/opioids-for-management-of-episodic-breathlessness-or-dyspnea-in-patients-with-advanced-disease
#14
REVIEW
Luis Cabezón-Gutiérrez, Parham Khosravi-Shahi, Sara Custodio-Cabello, Francisco Muñiz-González, Maria Del Puerto Cano-Aguirre, Soledad Alonso-Viteri
BACKGROUND: Episodic breathlessness (EB) or dyspnea is a common symptom with a very negative impact on the quality of life of patients with cancer and with non-oncological advanced diseases, mainly cardiorespiratory and neurological. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this non-systematic review is to ascertain the role played by opioids in the management of episodic breathlessness. METHODS: A non-systematic literature review was done in the databases MEDLINE, COCHRANE, and DATABASE, and articles of greater scientific rigor, mainly reviews or prospective studies/randomized clinical trials published to date (August 2015), were selected...
September 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27290968/bimodal-analgesia-vs-fentanyl-in-pediatric-patients-undergoing-bilateral-myringotomy-and-tympanostomy-tube-placement-a-propensity-matched-cohort-study
#15
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Maxie L Phillips, Bryan C Willis, Aaron J Broman, Humphrey V Lam, Thanh T Nguyen, Thomas M Austin
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Bilateral myringotomy and tympanostomy tube placement (BMT) is one of the most frequently performed pediatric outpatient procedures with 667,000 children receiving tympanostomy tubes annually. Because of this high volume, discovering the ideal analgesic regimen may lead to decreased overall postanesthesia care unit (PACU) costs while increasing patient and parent satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to determine if there is any benefit in supplementing intranasal (IN) fentanyl with intramuscular (IM) ketorolac with regard to immediate recovery characteristics...
August 2016: Journal of Clinical Anesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27260499/managing-pediatric-pain-in-the-emergency-department
#16
REVIEW
Benoit Bailey, Evelyne D Trottier
Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain...
August 2016: Paediatric Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27198122/midazolam-for-sedation-before-procedures
#17
REVIEW
Aaron Conway, John Rolley, Joanna R Sutherland
BACKGROUND: Midazolam is used for sedation before diagnostic and therapeutic medical procedures. It is an imidazole benzodiazepine that has depressant effects on the central nervous system (CNS) with rapid onset of action and few adverse effects. The drug can be administered by several routes including oral, intravenous, intranasal and intramuscular. OBJECTIVES: To determine the evidence on the effectiveness of midazolam for sedation when administered before a procedure (diagnostic or therapeutic)...
May 20, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27193080/an-open-label-randomised-controlled-trial-on-the-efficacy-of-adding-intranasal-fentanyl-to-intravenous-tramadol-in-patients-with-moderate-to-severe-pain-following-acute-musculoskeletal-injuries
#18
Keng Sheng Chew, Abdul Hafiz Shaharudin
INTRODUCTION: The use of intranasal fentanyl as an alternative type of analgesia has been shown to be effective in paediatric populations and prehospital settings. Studies on the use of intranasal fentanyl in adult patients in emergency settings are limited. METHODS: An open-label study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the addition of 1.5 mcg/kg intranasal fentanyl to 2 mg/kg intravenous tramadol (fentanyl + tramadol arm, n = 10) as compared to the administration of 2 mg/kg intravenous tramadol alone (tramadol-only arm, n = 10) in adult patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal injuries...
May 19, 2016: Singapore Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27118747/newborn-with-severe-epidermolysis-bullosa-to-treat-or-not-to-treat
#19
Martin Lehmann Boesen, Anette Bygum, Jens Michael Hertz, Gitte Zachariassen
Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is an inherited skin disease with four main subtypes that cannot be distinguished clinically at birth. All subtypes may present with widespread life-threatening blisters and fragile skin, making treatment and handling of the newborn with EB challenging. The prognosis of EB depends on the subtype, and therefore maximum treatment is necessary until the final diagnosis is known. In this case, it took 2 weeks before a final diagnosis was reached. In the meantime, we had several ethical discussions on the treatment level...
April 26, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27062626/pain-management-in-the-acute-care-setting-update-and-debates
#20
REVIEW
Greta M Palmer
Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions...
February 2016: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health
keyword
keyword
10648
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"