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Intranasal seizure

Megan C Marino, Daniel G Ostermayer, Juan A Mondragon, Elizabeth A Camp, Elizabeth M Keating, Louis B Fornage, Charles A Brown, Manish I Shah
BACKGROUND: Seizures and anaphylaxis are life-threatening conditions that require immediate treatment in the prehospital setting. There is variation in treatment of pediatric prehospital patients for both anaphylaxis and seizures. This educational study was done to improve compliance with pediatric prehospital protocols, educate prehospital providers and decrease variation in care. OBJECTIVE: To improve the quality of care for children with seizures and anaphylaxis in the prehospital setting using a bundled, multifaceted educational intervention...
January 24, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Amy McTague, Timothy Martland, Richard Appleton
BACKGROUND: Tonic-clonic convulsions and convulsive status epilepticus (currently defined as a tonic-clonic convulsion lasting at least 30 minutes) are medical emergencies and require urgent and appropriate anticonvulsant treatment. International consensus is that an anticonvulsant drug should be administered for any tonic-clonic convulsion that has been continuing for at least five minutes. Benzodiazepines (diazepam, lorazepam, midazolam) are traditionally regarded as first-line drugs and phenobarbital, phenytoin and paraldehyde as second-line drugs...
January 10, 2018: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Samuel J Perna, James M Rhinewalt, Erin R Currie
BACKGROUND: Status epilepticus seizures are distressing events for hospice and palliative care patients. Currently, rectal diazepam is the only abortive therapy approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for seizures occurring out of hospital. However, transmucosal (buccal and intranasal) midazolam hydrochloride is a less expensive, equally effective, and a more socially acceptable alternative. OBJECTIVE: To explore the use of transmucosal midazolam in out-of-hospital hospice patients in the State of Alabama...
January 5, 2018: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Qizheng Cai, Lei Feng, Kai Zhen Yap
Recent studies have suggested oxytocin as a possible drug to treat social deficits caused by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the safety of intranasal oxytocin in autistic patients has not been established. The aim of this review was to characterize the side-effect profile of long-term intranasal oxytocin in treatment of ASD compared to placebo. All randomized controlled trials of intranasal oxytocin in the treatment of ASD published before 1 January 2017 that reported safety data were identified from databases, including PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and International Pharmaceutical Abstract...
March 2018: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
John Benfield, Alberto Musto
Status epilepticus (SE) is a medical emergency characterized by uncontrolled, prolonged seizures with rapid and widespread neuronal damage. Patients that suffer from longer episodes of SE are more likely to have poorer clinical outcomes and a higher cost of healthcare. Understanding novel molecular mechanisms that regulate inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission that initiate SE and the necessary medical infrastructure to stop SE could help identify targets for early intervention. Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines may shorten the time between initiation and cessation of seizures when compared to other routes of administration...
March 2018: Drugs in R&D
Owen Davies, Sarah Spencer, Slavomira Necova, Emma Holmes, Angela Taylor, Laura Blackwood, Ana Lara-Garcia
Three dogs were investigated for chronic unilateral nasal discharge. In all cases CT imaging showed an intranasal mass causing turbinate lysis and no evidence of metastasis. Cytology in cases 1 (a 14-year-old neutered male crossbreed dog) and 2 (a five-year-old neutered male German Shepherd dog) demonstrated a pleomorphic cell population with variable intracellular pigment suspicious of melanocytic neoplasia. Histopathology with immunohistochemistry (Melan-A and vimentin, plus PNL-2 in one case) confirmed the diagnosis of melanoma in all dogs...
October 6, 2017: Veterinary Quarterly
Cheuk C Au, Ricardo G Branco, Robert C Tasker
OBJECTIVE: This systematic review of national or regional guidelines published in English aimed to better understand variance in pre-hospital and emergency department treatment of status epilepticus. SOURCES: Systematic search of national or regional guidelines (January 2000 to February 2017) contained within PubMed and Google Scholar databases, and article reference lists. The search keywords were status epilepticus, prolonged seizure, treatment, and guideline...
November 2017: Jornal de Pediatria
Jishnu K S Krishnan, Taíza H Figueiredo, John R Moffett, Peethambaran Arun, Abhilash P Appu, Narayanan Puthillathu, Maria F Braga, Thomas Flagg, Aryan M Namboodiri
Organophosphate chemical threat agents (OP-CTA) exert toxic effects through cholinergic over-activation. However, after the initial cholinergic phase, the pathophysiology shifts to a non-cholinergic phase which leads to prolonged status epilepticus (SE), irreversible neuronal degeneration and long-term damage to the central nervous system. The efficacy of delayed treatments against OP-CTA is generally low due to the fact that most drugs fail to inhibit the later phase of non-cholinergic activation. Recently, we reported that intranasal brain delivery of obidoxime (OBD) provides complete neuroprotection against a lethal dose of paraoxon when administered 5min after intoxication...
December 2017: Neurotoxicology
Masanori Ito, Hisaaki Takahashi, Hajime Yano, Yusuke I Shimizu, Yoshiaki Yano, Yoshito Ishizaki, Junya Tanaka, Eiichi Ishii, Mitsumasa Fukuda
Levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), an important inflammatory mediator, are high in the serum of febrile seizure (FS) patients. However, its roles in FS and secondary epilepsy after prolonged FS are poorly understood. We demonstrate HMGB1's role in the pathogenesis of hyperthermia-induced seizures (HS) and secondary epilepsy after prolonged hyperthermia-induced seizures (pHS). In the first experiment, 14-15-day-old male rats were divided into four groups: high-dose HMGB1 (100 μg), moderate-dose (10 μg), low-dose (1 μg), and control...
December 2017: Metabolic Brain Disease
Jing'an Lei, Fang Feng, Yuanyuan Duan, Feng Xu, Zhiguang Liu, Lifei Lian, Qiming Liang, Na Zhang, Furong Wang
BACKGROUND: Nerve growth factor (NGF) shows neuroprotection while it is hard to cross the blood-brain barrier due to its large molecular weight. Our study used intranasal delivery of NGF to treat the experimental epilepsy. METHODS: The seizure was induced by injection of pentylenetetrazol (40mg/kg) into the rat. Based on the behavior performance, the successful models were randomized into control and NGF groups, given medium or NGF intranasally, respectively. The onset and duration of seizure were recorded...
July 11, 2017: Brain Research Bulletin
Manish Raisingani, Resmy Palliyil Gopi, Bina Shah
Management of central diabetes insipidus in infancy is challenging. The various forms of desmopressin, oral, subcutaneous, and intranasal, have variability in the duration of action. Infants consume most of their calories as liquids which with desmopressin puts them at risk for hyponatremia and seizures. There are few cases reporting chlorothiazide as a temporizing measure for central diabetes insipidus in infancy. A male infant presented on day of life 30 with holoprosencephaly, cleft lip and palate, and poor weight gain to endocrine clinic...
2017: Case Reports in Pediatrics
Deborah L McBride
Administering medications through the nose as an alternative to intramuscular or intravenous injections is increasingly popular in emergency departments and out-of hospital settings because it is simple, fast, and can be used in situations where obtaining intravenous access is difficult or time intensive. This article examines the literature and indications for the out-of-hospital and emergency department administration of five commonly used intranasal medications: midazolam (used to sedate children and treat seizures), fentanyl (for pain relief), naloxone (for opioid overdoses), ketamine (to induce anesthesia) and dexmedetomidine (to sedate and relieve pain in children)...
May 24, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Alexander K Berg, Michael J Myrvik, Peter J Van Ess
AIM: Characterize pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and safety/tolerability of USL261 in geriatric adults to inform its potential for treating bouts of increased seizure activity. METHODS: Phase 1, randomized, double-blind, 2-way crossover study in healthy geriatric (≥65years; n=18) and non-geriatric (18-40years; n=12) adults evaluated single USL261 doses (2.5 and 5.0mg) administered intranasally. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated for midazolam and 1-hydroxymidazolam (active metabolite), including area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC), maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), time to Cmax (Tmax), and half-life (t1/2)...
June 2017: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
M Charalambous, S F M Bhatti, L Van Ham, S Platt, N D Jeffery, A Tipold, J Siedenburg, H A Volk, D Hasegawa, A Gallucci, G Gandini, M Musteata, E Ives, A E Vanhaesebrouck
BACKGROUND: Intranasal administration of benzodiazepines has shown superiority over rectal administration for terminating emergency epileptic seizures in human trials. No such clinical trials have been performed in dogs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intranasal midazolam (IN-MDZ), via a mucosal atomization device, as a first-line management option for canine status epilepticus and compare it to rectal administration of diazepam (R-DZP) for controlling status epilepticus before intravenous access is available...
July 2017: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Eric C Silverman, Karl A Sporer, Justin M Lemieux, John F Brown, Kristi L Koenig, Marianne Gausche-Hill, Eric M Rudnick, Angelo A Salvucci, Greg H Gilbert
INTRODUCTION: We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of adult and pediatric patients with a seizure and to compare these recommendations against the current protocol used by the 33 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies in California. METHODS: We performed a review of the evidence in the prehospital treatment of patients with a seizure, and then compared the seizure protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations...
April 2017: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Yunxiao Kang, Wensheng Yan, Hui Fang, Guoliang Zhang, Yakun Du, Lei Wang, Huixian Cui, Geming Shi
The current studies were aimed at evaluating the efficacy of intranasal pentoxifylline (Ptx) pretreatment in protecting mesodopaminergic system and hippocampus from oxidative damage of lithium-pilocarpine induced status epilepticus (SE) and the involvement of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2- (Nrf2-) antioxidant response elements pathway. Pentoxifylline was administered to rats intranasally or intraperitoneally 30 minutes before inducing SE. Our results showed the impaired visuospatial memory, the defected mesodopaminergic system, and the oxidative damage and the transient activation of Nrf2 in SE rats...
2017: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Megan A Rech, Brian Barbas, Whitney Chaney, Elizabeth Greenhalgh, Charles Turck
The intranasal route for medication administration is increasingly popular in the emergency department and out-of-hospital setting because such administration is simple and fast, and can be used for patients without intravenous access and in situations in which obtaining an intravenous line is difficult or time intensive (eg, for patients who are seizing or combative). Several small studies (mostly pediatric) have shown midazolam to be effective for procedural sedation, anxiolysis, and seizures. Intranasal fentanyl demonstrates both safety and efficacy for the management of acute pain...
August 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
Abdussalam Alshehri, Ahmad Abulaban, Rakan Bokhari, Suleiman Kojan, Majid Alsalamah, Mazen Ferwana, Mohammad Hassan Murad
BACKGROUND: The acquisition of intravenous (IV) access in the actively convulsing patient is difficult. This often delays the administration of the IV benzodiazepine (BDZ) necessary for seizure cessation. Delays in seizure cessation are associated with increased pharmacoresistance, increased risk of neuronal injury, worse patient outcomes, and increased morbidity. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess whether the delay imposed by IV access acquisition is justified by improved outcomes...
July 2017: Academic Emergency Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Abby M Bailey, Regan A Baum, Karolyn Horn, Tameka Lewis, Kate Morizio, Amy Schultz, Kyle Weant, Stephanie N Justice
BACKGROUND: Intranasal (IN) medication delivery is a viable alternative to other routes of administration, including intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration. The IN route bypasses the risk of needle-stick injuries and alleviates the emotional trauma that may arise from the insertion of an IV catheter. OBJECTIVE: This review aims to evaluate published literature on medications administered via the IN route that are applicable to practice in emergency medicine...
July 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
K Lazzerini, R Gutierrez-Quintana, R José-López, F McConnell, R Gonçalves, J McMurrough, S De Decker, C Muir, S L Priestnall, L Mari, F Stabile, L De Risio, C Loeffler, A Tauro, C Rusbridge, S Rodenas, S Añor, C de la Fuente, A Fischer, A Bruehschwein, J Penderis, J Guevar
BACKGROUND: The term meningoencephalocele (MEC) describes a herniation of cerebral tissue and meninges through a defect in the cranium, whereas a meningocele (MC) is a herniation of the meninges alone. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinical features, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, and outcomes of dogs with cranial MC and MEC. ANIMALS: Twenty-two client-owned dogs diagnosed with cranial MC or MEC. METHODS: Multicentric retrospective descriptive study...
March 2017: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
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