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New oral anticoagulants bleeding

Dénes Lukács, Nóra Stáczer, László Vajta, Lajos Olasz, Árpád Joób-Fancsaly, József Szalma
INTRODUCTION: In 2015 a new Hungarian guideline was published regarding dental treatment and management of anticoagulated patients in agreement of the Hungarian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the Dental Implantology Association of Hungarian Dentists. AIM: The aim of the authors was to evaluate the efficiency and safety of local hemostatic measures recommended by the guideline in anticoagulated patients. METHOD: In these patients, postoperative bleeding episodes were examined after dental and oral surgical treatments, retrospectively...
October 2016: Orvosi Hetilap
Lai Heng Lee
The group of new oral anticoagulants or NOACs, now termed direct oral anticoagulants or DOACs, with their favourable results from large scale phase III clinical trials, represent a major advancement and expanded armamentarium in antithrombotic therapy. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are now in clinical routine use for prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thrombotic diseases as addressed in their clinical trials. Usage of the DOACs is expected to increase as clinicians gain more experience and reassurance with data from the real world studies which are generally consistent with that from clinical trials...
2016: Thrombosis Journal
Ozan Gökdoğan, Ilker Akyildiz, Begum Yetis Sayin, Sercan Okutucu, Ali Cevat Tanalp, Necmi Arslan
Nose bleeding is a common situation seen in otorhinolaryngological practices. One of the greatest risk factors in nose bleeding is the use of anticoagulant medicine. With the medicine developed in recent years, the risk of nose bleeding due to the frequent use of anticoagulant and antiagregant is gradually increasing.The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of especially new-generation anticoagulants on nose bleeding. In addition, the use and complications of new-generation anticoagulants and antiagregants have been compiled in light of information obtained from the literature...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Fatima Urooj, Abhishek Kulkarni, Dwight Stapleton, Edo Kaluski
The choice of an oral anticoagulant (OAC) for patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is a major and complex clinical decision taking into account the individual risk-benefit ratio and bearing in mind the chronicity of therapy. This review focuses on the safety and efficacy of new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) compared with conventional vitamin K antagonists (VKA) in patients with NVAF. Current data suggest that NOACs are at least as effective and safe as VKAs for most NVAF subjects. The NOACs do not mandate dietary restrictions and regular pharmacodynamic monitoring, and they seem to have lesser incidence of intracranial or fatal bleeding when compared with VKAs...
October 7, 2016: Clinical Cardiology
John Eikelboom, Geno Merli
The risk of bleeding in the setting of anticoagulant therapy continues to be re-evaluated following the introduction of a new generation of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Interruption of DOAC therapy and supportive care may be sufficient for the management of patients who present with mild or moderate bleeding, but in those with life-threatening bleeding, a specific reversal agent is desirable. We review the phase 3 clinical studies of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, in the context of bleeding risk and management...
September 29, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Andrea Morotti, Joshua N Goldstein
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are an attractive therapeutic option for anticoagulant treatment in the setting of venous thromboembolism or non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These drugs overall appear to have a lower risk of life-threatening hemorrhage than the vitamin K antagonists. In addition, they demonstrate more predictable and stable pharmacokinetics. Measurement of the degree of anticoagulation is desirable in patients with DOAC-associated hemorrhage, but commonly available coagulation assays show poor sensitivity for degree of DOAC effect...
November 2016: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
David J Graham, Marsha E Reichman, Michael Wernecke, Ya-Hui Hsueh, Rima Izem, Mary Ross Southworth, Yuqin Wei, Jiemin Liao, Margie R Goulding, Katrina Mott, Yoganand Chillarige, Thomas E MaCurdy, Chris Worrall, Jeffrey A Kelman
Importance: Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants approved for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (AF). There are no randomized head-to-head comparisons of these drugs for stroke, bleeding, or mortality outcomes. Objective: To compare risks of thromboembolic stroke, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major extracranial bleeding including major gastrointestinal bleeding, and mortality in patients with nonvalvular AF who initiated dabigatran or rivaroxaban treatment for stroke prevention...
October 3, 2016: JAMA Internal Medicine
M Muñoz-Corcuera, L Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, R-M López-Pintor, E Casañas-Gil, G Hernández-Vallejo
Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. _Material and Methods: We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library...
October 1, 2016: Medicina Oral, Patología Oral y Cirugía Bucal
Aarti A Patel, Winnie W Nelson, Jeff Schein
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to report on the effect of using CHA2DS2VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years [doubled], type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, stroke or transient ischemic attack or thromboembolism [doubled], vascular disease [prior myocardial infarction, peripheral artery disease, or aortic plaque], age 65-75 years, sex category [female]) rather than CHADS2 (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 years, diabetes mellitus, and prior stroke) to determine candidacy for anticoagulant prophylaxis in insured patients with atrial fibrillation (AF)...
September 23, 2016: Clinical Therapeutics
Stefan Hofer, Christoph Philipsenburg, Markus A Weigand, Thorsten Brenner
Dabigatran etexilate is a direct oral anticoagulant used for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a recently approved specific antidote that reverses the effect of dabigatran within minutes. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient with traumatic retroperitoneal arterial bleeding under anticoagulation with dabigatran etexilate. By administration of idarucizumab, we successfully normalized coagulation and saved the patient from an operation. In the course of the disease, a slight reincrease in dabigatran etexilate plasma levels was observed 2 days after the reversal, which could lead to a new onset of bleeding...
September 23, 2016: A & A Case Reports
Steven Sra, Mary K Tan, Shamir R Mehta, Harold N Fisher, Jean-Pierre Déry, Robert C Welsh, Mark J Eisenberg, Christopher B Overgaard, Barry F Rose, Anthony J Della Siega, Asim N Cheema, Brian Y L Wong, Mark A Henderson, Sohrab Lutchmedial, Shahar Lavi, Shaun G Goodman, Andrew T Yan
BACKGROUND: Since the introduction of newer, more potent P2Y12 receptor inhibitors (P2Y12ris), practice patterns and associated clinical outcomes in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and also requiring oral anticoagulation (OAC) have not been fully characterized. METHODS: The Canadian Observational Antiplatelet Study was a prospective, multicenter, longitudinal, observational study (26 hospitals, December 2011 to May 2013) describing P2Y12ri treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation MI undergoing PCI...
October 2016: American Heart Journal
Reza Ganji, Shahram Ala, Mohsen Aarabi, Babak Baghery, Ebrahim Salehifar
Acute Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) is a common disease associated with the significant morbidity and mortality. We reviewed clinical outcomes systematically with Dabigatran as a direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) for treatment of acute VTE. We used Ovide, PubMed, Cochrane (CENTRAL), EMBASE, Scopus, Science Direct, LILAC(for article written not English) and also Iranian database; Magiran, Isc, Iran Medex, Iran DOC, Doaj up to May 2014 to identify randomized clinical trials of Dabigatran compared with conventional treatment for VTE...
2016: Iranian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research: IJPR
Jack E Ansell
The vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with a significant rate of major and fatal bleeding complications. The new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), even though having a better bleeding profile than the VKAs, are still associated with serious bleeding. The anticoagulation induced by the VKAs can be reversed with both vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrates, whereas the DOACs were developed without specific reversal agents. Although there is controversy around the necessity of a reversal agent, most clinicians agree that having a reversal agent for the DOACs would be beneficial...
October 2016: Hematology/oncology Clinics of North America
Neena S Abraham, Jennifer L Horsley-Silva
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To quantify direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) related gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), characterize patients at greatest risk and provide a pragmatic approach for the management of these drugs. This review will also summarize risk-management strategies and highlight evolving areas of clinical knowledge. RECENT FINDINGS: DOACs permit anticoagulation with predictable dosing without the need for routine serum monitoring. Since their availability on the market, they have quickly emerged as a popular alternative for patients requiring short-term and lifelong anticoagulation...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Gastroenterology
Martin B Steed, Matthew T Swanson
The new direct oral anticoagulants-dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban- have predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles and are alternatives to warfarin. However, many surgeons are wary of these drugs, as there is limited evidence on how to manage bleeding in patients taking them, and only recently has a specific antidote been developed to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Management of the newer agents requires careful adherence to primary measures of bleeding care, knowledge of their mechanism of action, and familiarity with the unapproved and untested reversal strategies that may be required in patients with life-threatening bleeding...
November 2016: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
B Schenk, P Würtinger, W Streif, W Sturm, D Fries, M Bachler
BACKGROUND: In major bleeding events, the new direct oral anticoagulants pose a great challenge for physicians. The aim of the study was to test for ex vivo reversal of the direct oral anticoagulant rivaroxaban with various non-specific reversal agents: prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC), recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa), and fibrinogen concentrate (FI). METHODS: Blood was obtained from healthy volunteers and from patients treated with rivaroxaban...
September 13, 2016: British Journal of Anaesthesia
Guillaume Cayla, Florence Leclercq, Laurent Schmutz, Luc Cornillet, Bertrand Ledermann, Patrick Messner, Benoit Lattuca
Venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation are two important indications of direct oral anticoagulants. Acute coronary syndrome is another potential indication of prolonged antithrombotic therapy in addition to antiplatelet therapy. Phase 2 and 3 studies were conducted with different molecules at different doses in acute coronary syndrome in addition to dual antiplatelet therapy. Studies have not shown a reduction of ischemic events for dabigatran and apixaban, but an excess of bleeding complications was observed...
September 2, 2016: La Presse Médicale
Zaheer Ahmed, Seemeen Hassan, Gary A Salzman
Warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for the treatment of venous thromboembolism for about half a century until the recent approval of novel oral agents dabigatran, rivoraxaban and apixaban. This presents new classes of medications less cumbersome to use. They do not require frequent laboratory monitoring or have nurmerous drug interactions. On the other hand it also poses a challenge to the physicians deciding which agent to use in specific patient populations, how to predict the bleeding risk compared to warfarin and between the different novel agents and how to manage bleeding with relatively recent discovery of few potential antidotes...
April 2016: Current Drug Therapy
Johannes T H Nielen, Pieter C Dagnelie, Pieter J Emans, Nicole Veldhorst-Janssen, Arief Lalmohamed, Tjeerd-Pieter van Staa, Annelies E R C H Boonen, Bart J F van den Bemt, Frank de Vries
BACKGROUND: There has been much debate recently on the best type of thromboprophylaxis following elective total joint replacement surgery. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to compare rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE), gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding and mortality events, with use of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) or low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) compared with aspirin in patients undergoing total joint replacement. METHODS: A population-based retrospective cohort study was performed using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink...
September 4, 2016: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
John Eikelboom, Geno Merli
The risk of bleeding in the setting of anticoagulant therapy continues to be re-evaluated following the introduction of a new generation of direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs). Interruption of DOAC therapy and supportive care may be sufficient for the management of patients who present with mild or moderate bleeding, but in those with life-threatening bleeding, a specific reversal agent is desirable. We review the phase 3 clinical studies of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, in the context of bleeding risk and management...
November 2016: American Journal of Medicine
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