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Tularemia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29150245/-skin-manifestations-of-tularemia
#1
E Meriglier, P Roblot, C Landron
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 14, 2017: Médecine et Maladies Infectieuses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29145508/irruptive-mammal-host-populations-shape-tularemia-epidemiology
#2
Juan J Luque-Larena, François Mougeot, Beatriz Arroyo, Mª Dolors Vidal, Ruth Rodríguez-Pastor, Raquel Escudero, Pedro Anda, Xavier Lambin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122856/first-draft-genome-sequences-of-three-strains-of-francisella-tularensis-subsp-holarctica-isolated-from-hares-and-a-tick-in-france
#3
Nora Madani, Philippe Giraud, Christiane Mendy, Cécile Colaneri, Emeline Cherchame, Moulay-Ali Cherfa, Céline Richomme, Anouk Decors, Guillaume Girault
Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three strains of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica (11-789-5S, 11-935-13S, and 11-930-9S), isolated from brown hares and a tick during a tularemia outbreak in France, where tularemia is endemic.
November 9, 2017: Genome Announcements
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118164/evaluation-of-in-house-and-commercial-serological-tests-for-diagnosis-of-human-tularemia
#4
Hadjila Yanes, Aurélie Hennebique, Isabelle Pelloux, Sandrine Boisset, Dominique J Bicout, Yvan Caspar, Max Maurin
Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis Its specific diagnosis remains based on serological methods, while detection of F. tularensis in clinical samples by culture or PCR is rarely obtained. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of the SERION ELISA classic Francisella tularensis IgG and IgM tests (Virion/Serion GmbH Institute, Würzburg, Germany) and the VIRapid® Tularemia immunochromatographic (ICT) test (VIRCELL, Granada, Spain), compared to the in-house microagglutination (MAT) and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) tests currently used at the French National Reference Centre for Francisella...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Clinical Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29102170/protection-of-vaccinated-mice-against-pneumonic-tularemia-is-associated-with-an-early-memory-sentinel-response-in-the-lung
#5
Liat Bar-On, Hila Cohen, Uri Elia, Shahar Rotem, Adi Bercovich-Kinori, Erez Bar-Haim, Theodor Chitlaru, Ofer Cohen
Francisella tularensis is the intracellular bacterial pathogen causing the respiratory life-threatening disease tularemia. Development of tularemia vaccines has been hampered by an incomplete understanding of the correlates of immunity. Moreover, the importance of lung cellular immunity in vaccine-mediated protection against tularemia is a controversial matter. Live attenuated vaccine strains of F. tularensis such as LVS (Live Vaccine Strain), elicit an immune response protecting mice against subsequent challenge with the virulent SchuS4 strain, yet the protective immunity against pulmonary challenge is limited in its efficacy and longevity...
October 25, 2017: Vaccine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29063667/bacterial-lipoproteins-and-other-factors-released-by-francisella-tularensis-modulate-human-neutrophil-lifespan-effects-of-a-tlr1-snp-on-apoptosis-inhibition
#6
Lauren C Kinkead, Laura C Whitmore, Jenna M McCracken, Joshua R Fletcher, Brandi B Ketelsen, Justin W Kaufman, Bradley D Jones, David S Weiss, Jason H Barker, Lee-Ann H Allen
F. tularensis infects several cell types including neutrophils, and aberrant neutrophil accumulation contributes to tissue destruction during tularemia. We demonstrated previously that F. tularensis strains Schu S4 and LVS markedly delay human neutrophil apoptosis and thereby prolong cell lifespan, but the bacterial factors that mediate this aspect of virulence are undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that bacterial conditioned medium (CM) can delay apoptosis in the absence of direct infection. Biochemical analyses show that CM contained F...
October 23, 2017: Cellular Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29054578/tularemia-in-interepidemic-period
#7
Javier Miguel Martín Guerra, Miguel Martín Asenjo, José María Prieto de Paula
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2017: Medicina Clínica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29029346/botanical-compound-p-anisaldehyde-repels-larval-lone-star-tick-acari-ixodidae-and-halts-reproduction-by-gravid-adults
#8
Allan T Showler, Jessica L Harlien
The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (L.), widely distributed across eastern, southeastern, and midwestern regions of the United States and south into Mexico, is an obligate blood feeder that attaches to three hosts during the larval, nymphal, and adult stages. White-tailed deer and wild turkey are common hosts, as well as a wide variety of other avian and mammalian hosts. Amblyomma americanum is the most frequently reported species of tick to bite humans in the southeastern and southcentral United States, and it can transmit diseases that include erhlichiosis, rickettsiosis, tularemia, and protozoan infections...
October 4, 2017: Journal of Medical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29018123/characterization-of-inner-and-outer-membrane-proteins-from-francisella-tularensis-strains-lvs-and-schu-s4-and-identification-of-potential-subunit-vaccine-candidates
#9
Deborah M B Post, Bram Slütter, Birgit Schilling, Aroon T Chande, Jed A Rasmussen, Bradley D Jones, Alexandria K D'Souza, Lorri M Reinders, John T Harty, Bradford W Gibson, Michael A Apicella
Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia and a potential bioterrorism agent. In the present study, we isolated, identified, and quantified the proteins present in the membranes of the virulent type A strain, Schu S4, and the attenuated type B strain, LVS (live vaccine strain). Spectral counting of mass spectrometric data showed enrichment for membrane proteins in both strains. Mice vaccinated with whole LVS membranes encapsulated in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing the adjuvant polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I·C)] showed significant protection against a challenge with LVS compared to the results seen with naive mice or mice vaccinated with either membranes or poly(I·C) alone...
October 10, 2017: MBio
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29017676/rare-cause-of-pleuropnemonia-tularemia-disease
#10
Meltem Agca, Dildar Duman, Ebru Sulu, Fatma Ozbaki, Orcun Barkay, Derya Ozturk, Tulay Yarkin
Tularemia is a zoonotic infection which is caused by gram negative coccobacilli, Francisella tularensis. The disease occurs after contact with blood and body fluids of infected animals, bites and ingestion of infected food and water. Although it commonly presents with skin lesions, there may also be serious organ involvements. A55-year woman was consulted for presumptive diagnosis of tuberculosis. Multiple lymphadenopathy in right cervical area was present on physical examination. Pleural effusion on left side was detected with computed tomography...
September 2017: Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons—Pakistan: JCPSP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28994770/intratracheal-inoculation-of-fischer-344-rats-with-francisella-tularensis
#11
Jesse Q Nguyen, Xhavit Zogaj, Aanuoluwa A Adelani, Ping Chu, Jieh-Juen Yu, Bernard P Arulanandam, Karl E Klose
Pulmonary infection with the bacterium Francisella tularensis can lead to the serious and potentially fatal disease, tularemia, in humans. Due to the current lack of an approved tularemia vaccine for humans, research is focused on vaccine development utilizing appropriate animal models. The Fischer 344 rat has emerged as a model that reflects human susceptibility to F. tularensis infection, and thus is an attractive model for tularemia vaccine development. Intratracheal inoculation of the Fischer 344 rat with F...
September 30, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28981682/francisella-like-endosymbiont-detected-in-haemaphysalis-ticks-acari-ixodidae-from-the-republic-of-korea
#12
Ratree Takhampunya, Heung-Chul Kim, Sung-Tae Chong, Achareeya Korkusol, Bousaraporn Tippayachai, Silas A Davidson, Jeannine M Petersen, Terry A Klein
A total of 6,255 ticks belonging to three genera and six species (Haemaphysalis flava Neumann, Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann, Haemaphysalis phasiana Saito, Ixodes nipponensis Kitaoka & Saito, Ixodes persulcatus Schulze, and Amblyomma testudinarium Koch) collected from May-August, 2013, at four southwestern provinces in the Republic of Korea (ROK) were submitted to the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences and assayed for selected tick-borne pathogens. One pool each of H. flava and H. phasiana was positive by PCR and sequencing for a Francisella-like endosymbiont, while all pools were negative for Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia...
November 7, 2017: Journal of Medical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28968459/ifn-%C3%AE-extends-the-immune-functions-of-guanylate-binding-proteins-to-inflammasome-independent-antibacterial-activities-during-francisella-novicida-infection
#13
Pierre Wallet, Sacha Benaoudia, Amandine Mosnier, Brice Lagrange, Amandine Martin, Helena Lindgren, Igor Golovliov, Fanny Michal, Pauline Basso, Sophia Djebali, Angelina Provost, Omran Allatif, Etienne Meunier, Petr Broz, Masahiro Yamamoto, Bénédicte F Py, Eric Faudry, Anders Sjöstedt, Thomas Henry
Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible proteins involved in the cell-intrinsic immunity against numerous intracellular pathogens. The molecular mechanisms underlying the potent antibacterial activity of GBPs are still unclear. GBPs have been functionally linked to the NLRP3, the AIM2 and the caspase-11 inflammasomes. Two opposing models are currently proposed to explain the GBPs-inflammasome link: i) GBPs would target intracellular bacteria or bacteria-containing vacuoles to increase cytosolic PAMPs release ii) GBPs would directly facilitate inflammasome complex assembly...
October 2017: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28968195/abiotic-and-biotic-contributors-to-support-inter-epidemic-francisella-tularensis-in-an-agricultural-peri-urban-environment
#14
Tara M Roth, Janet Foley, Stan Wright
To characterize the inter-epidemic ecology of Francisella tularensis, we surveyed vertebrates and invertebrates for the abundance, spatial distribution, and status of infection at a site in northern California that had evidence of endemic type B tularemia. We collected 2910 mosquitoes, 77 biting flies, 704 ticks, 115 mammals, and 1911 aquatic invertebrates in 2013-2014. Real-time PCR on all mosquitoes, 40 biting flies, 113 aquatic invertebrates, and 650 ticks did not detect F. tularensis DNA. Indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on 109 mammals revealed 2 (of 2, 100%) seropositive feral cats, 1 (of 24, 4...
November 2017: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28956784/first-case-of-severe-pneumonic-tularemia-in-an-immunocompetent-patient-in-the-netherlands
#15
K C E Sigaloff, P K Chung, J Koopmans, D W Notermans, G G C van Rijckevorsel, M Koene, R W Sprengers, J Gooskens, J E Stalenhoef
Tularemia is a zoonosis caused by different subspecies of the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis. We report the first case in the Netherlands of pneumonic tularemia caused by the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica after probable occupational inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Notification of cases of tularemia has been mandatory by law in the Netherlands since 1 November 2016.
September 2017: Netherlands Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28955505/necroptotic-debris-including-damaged-mitochondria-elicits-sepsis-like-syndrome-during-late-phase-tularemia
#16
Anju Singh, Sivakumar Periasamy, Meenakshi Malik, Chandra Shekhar Bakshi, Laurie Stephen, Jeffrey G Ault, Carmen A Mannella, Timothy J Sellati
Infection with Francisella tularensis ssp. tularensis (Ft) strain SchuS4 causes an often lethal disease known as tularemia in rodents, non-human primates, and humans. Ft subverts host cell death programs to facilitate their exponential replication within macrophages and other cell types during early respiratory infection (⩽72 h). The mechanism(s) by which cell death is triggered remains incompletely defined, as does the impact of Ft on mitochondria, the host cell's organellar 'canary in a coal mine'. Herein, we reveal that Ft infection of host cells, particularly macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, drives necroptosis via a receptor-interacting protein kinase 1/3-mediated mechanism...
2017: Cell Death Discovery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28955308/ar-13-a-celecoxib-derivative-directly-kills-francisella-in-vitro-and-aids-clearance-and-mouse-survival-in-vivo
#17
Ky V Hoang, Haley E Adcox, James R Fitch, David M Gordon, Heather M Curry, Larry S Schlesinger, Peter White, John S Gunn
Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is the causative agent of tularemia and is classified as a Tier 1 select agent. No licensed vaccine is currently available in the United States and treatment of tularemia is confined to few antibiotics. In this study, we demonstrate that AR-13, a derivative of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib, exhibits direct in vitro bactericidal killing activity against Francisella including a type A strain of F. tularensis (SchuS4) and the live vaccine strain (LVS), as well as toward the intracellular proliferation of LVS in macrophages, without causing significant host cell toxicity...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28951422/hematopoietic-myd88-and-il-18-are-essential-for-ifn-%C3%AE-dependent-restriction-of-type-a-francisella-tularensis-infection
#18
Jerod A Skyberg, Carolyn A Lacey
Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious intracellular bacterium that causes the potentially fatal disease tularemia. We used mice with conditional MyD88 deficiencies to investigate cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MyD88 restricts type A F. tularensis infection. F. tularensis-induced weight loss was predominately dependent on MyD88 signaling in nonhematopoietic cells. In contrast, MyD88 signaling in hematopoietic cells, but not in myeloid and dendritic cells, was essential for control of F. tularensis infection in tissue...
September 26, 2017: Journal of Leukocyte Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28873421/russian-isolates-enlarge-the-known-geographic-diversity-of-francisella-tularensis-subsp-mediasiatica
#19
Vitalii Timofeev, Irina Bakhteeva, Galina Titareva, Pavel Kopylov, David Christiany, Alexander Mokrievich, Ivan Dyatlov, Gilles Vergnaud
Francisella tularensis, a small Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of infecting a wide range of animals, including humans, and causes a plague-like disease called tularemia-a highly contagious disease with a high mortality rate. Because of these characteristics, F. tularensis is considered a potential agent of biological terrorism. Currently, F. tularensis is divided into four subspecies, which differ in their virulence and geographic distribution. Two of them, subsp. tularensis (primarily found in North America) and subsp...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28864445/dissection-of-the-molecular-circuitry-controlling-virulence-in-francisella-tularensis
#20
Bonnie J Cuthbert, Wilma Ross, Amy E Rohlfing, Simon L Dove, Richard L Gourse, Richard G Brennan, Maria A Schumacher
Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is one of the most infectious bacteria known. Because of its extreme pathogenicity, F. tularensis is classified as a category A bioweapon by the US government. F. tularensis virulence stems from genes encoded on the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI). An unusual set of Francisella regulators-the heteromeric macrophage growth locus protein A (MglA)-stringent starvation protein A (SspA) complex and the DNA-binding protein pathogenicity island gene regulator (PigR)-activates FPI transcription and thus is essential for virulence...
August 1, 2017: Genes & Development
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