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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197142/home-made-cost-effective-preservation-buffer-is-a-better-alternative-to-commercial-preservation-methods-for-microbiome-research
#1
Sebastian Menke, Mark A F Gillingham, Kerstin Wilhelm, Simone Sommer
The investigation of wildlife gastrointestinal microbiomes by next-generation sequencing approaches is a growing field in microbial ecology and conservation. Such studies often face difficulties in sample preservation if neither freezing facilities nor liquid nitrogen (LQN) are readily available. Thus, in order to prevent microbial community changes because of bacterial growth after sampling, preservation buffers need to be applied to samples. However, the amount of microbial community variation attributable to the different preservation treatments and potentially affecting biological interpretation is hardly known...
2017: Frontiers in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193891/mapping-evaporative-water-loss-in-desert-passerines-reveals-an-expanding-threat-of-lethal-dehydration
#2
Thomas P Albright, Denis Mutiibwa, Alexander R Gerson, Eric Krabbe Smith, William A Talbot, Jacqueline J O'Neill, Andrew E McKechnie, Blair O Wolf
Extreme high environmental temperatures produce a variety of consequences for wildlife, including mass die-offs. Heat waves are increasing in frequency, intensity, and extent, and are projected to increase further under climate change. However, the spatial and temporal dynamics of die-off risk are poorly understood. Here, we examine the effects of heat waves on evaporative water loss (EWL) and survival in five desert passerine birds across the southwestern United States using a combination of physiological data, mechanistically informed models, and hourly geospatial temperature data...
February 13, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187938/occurrence-of-veterinary-pharmaceuticals-in-golden-eagle-nestlings-unnoticed-scavenging-on-livestock-carcasses-and-other-potential-exposure-routes
#3
Guillermo Blanco, Alexandra Junza, Dolores Barrón
Wildlife exposure to pharmaceuticals can occur through contaminated water, and through the excreta and carcasses of medicated livestock, with potential for bioaccumulation and transfer through food webs. We evaluated whether nestling exposure to pharmaceuticals can occur from food delivered to nests in the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), a top predator and facultative scavenger. Despite the fact that diet analysis suggests an apparently low dependence on livestock carcasses reduced to two piglets remains (1...
February 7, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28186107/blubber-transcriptome-response-to-acute-stress-axis-activation-involves-transient-changes-in-adipogenesis-and-lipolysis-in-a-fasting-adapted-marine-mammal
#4
J I Khudyakov, C D Champagne, L M Meneghetti, D E Crocker
Stress can compromise an animal's ability to conserve metabolic stores and participate in energy-demanding activities that are critical for fitness. Understanding how wild animals, especially those already experiencing physiological extremes (e.g. fasting), regulate stress responses is critical for evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic disturbance on physiology and fitness, key challenges for conservation. However, studies of stress in wildlife are often limited to baseline endocrine measurements and few have investigated stress effects in fasting-adapted species...
February 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183038/supplementary-feeding-and-endoparasites-in-threatened-avian-scavengers-coprologic-evidence-from-red-kites-in-their-wintering-stronghold
#5
Guillermo Blanco, Jesús Cardells, María M Garijo-Toledo
Many obligate and facultative avian scavengers are increasingly dependent on food provided in supplementary feeding stations (SFS), which are managed for the conservation of these species. Deliberate feeding can influence disease-related host demography and population dynamics through physiological changes and density-dependent parasite acquisition and transmission, but information on this threat to avian scavengers is scarce. Due to their effects on host aggregation and density, we hypothesised that the predictability and concentration of food in SFS can exacerbate parasite infection...
February 6, 2017: Environmental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28176029/summarizing-us-wildlife-trade-with-an-eye-toward-assessing-the-risk-of-infectious-disease-introduction
#6
K M Smith, C Zambrana-Torrelio, A White, M Asmussen, C Machalaba, S Kennedy, K Lopez, T M Wolf, P Daszak, D A Travis, W B Karesh
The aim of this study was to characterize the role of the USA in the global exchange of wildlife and describe high volume trade with an eye toward prioritizing health risk assessment questions for further analysis. Here we summarize nearly 14 years (2000-2013) of the most comprehensive data available (USFWS LEMIS system), involving 11 billion individual specimens and an additional 977 million kilograms of wildlife. The majority of shipments contained mammals (27%), while the majority of specimens imported were shells (57%) and tropical fish (25%)...
February 7, 2017: EcoHealth
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28170027/snp-discovery-and-characterisation-in-white-rhino-ceratotherium-simum-with-application-to-parentage-assignment
#7
Christiaan Labuschagne, Desiré L Dalton, J Paul Grobler, Antoinette Kotzé
The white rhino is one of the great success stories of modern wildlife conservation, growing from as few as 50-100 animals in the 1880s, to approximately 20,000 white rhinoceros remaining today. However, illegal trade in conservational rhinoceros horns is adding constant pressure on remaining populations. Captive management of ex situ populations of endangered species using molecular methods can contribute to improving the management of the species. Here we compare for the first time the utility of 33 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and nine microsatellites (MS) in isolation and in combination for assigning parentage in captive White Rhinoceros...
February 6, 2017: Genetics and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169033/combining-habitat-requirements-of-endemic-bird-species-and-other-ecosystem-services-may-synergistically-enhance-conservation-efforts
#8
Mattia Brambilla, Luca Ilahiane, Giacomo Assandri, Silvia Ronchi, Giuseppe Bogliani
Biodiversity conservation and the optimisation of other ecosystem service delivery as a contribution to human well-being are often tackled as mutually alternative targets. Modern agriculture is a great challenge for the fulfilment of both. Here, we explore the potential benefits of integrating biodiversity conservation and the preservation of wider ecosystem services, considering the conservation of an endemic species (Moltoni's warbler Sylvia subalpina; Aves: Sylvidae) and soil erosion control (a final ecosystem service) in intensive vineyards in Italy...
February 3, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28162129/assessment-of-community-awareness-and-risk-perceptions-of-zoonotic-causes-of-abortion-in-cattle-at-three-selected-livestock-wildlife-interface-areas-of-zimbabwe
#9
M Ndengu, M DE Garine-Wichatitsky, D M Pfukenyi, M Tivapasi, B Mukamuri, G Matope
A study was conducted to assess the awareness of cattle abortions due to brucellosis, Rift Valley fever (RVF) and leptospirosis, and to compare frequencies of reported abortions in communities living at the periphery of the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Area in southeastern Zimbabwe. Three study sites were selected based on the type of livestock-wildlife interface: porous livestock-wildlife interface (unrestricted); non-porous livestock-wildlife interface (restricted by fencing); and livestock-wildlife non-interface (totally absent or control)...
February 6, 2017: Epidemiology and Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28161403/factors-affecting-the-distribution-of-haemosporidian-parasites-within-an-oceanic-island
#10
David P Padilla, Juan Carlos Illera, Catalina Gonzalez-Quevedo, Miry Villalba, David S Richardson
Understanding how different ecological and evolutionary processes influence the distribution of pathogens within the environment is important from many perspectives including wildlife epidemiology, evolutionary ecology and conservation. The simultaneous use of ecological and evolutionary frameworks can enhance our conceptual understanding of host-parasite interactions, however such studies are rare in the wild. Using samples from 12 bird species caught across all habitats existing on an oceanic island, we evaluated how environmental variables, parasite host specificity and parasite phylogenetic relationships determine the distribution and prevalence of haemosporidians (Haemoproteus, Plasmodium and Leucocytozoon) in the wild living avifauna...
February 2, 2017: International Journal for Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28151078/isolation-and-characterization-of-a-novel-marine-brucella-from-a-southern-sea-otter-enhydra-lutris-nereis-california-usa
#11
Melissa A Miller, Tristan L Burgess, Erin M Dodd, Jack C Rhyan, Spencer S Jang, Barbara A Byrne, Frances M Gulland, Michael J Murray, Sharon Toy-Choutka, Patricia A Conrad, Cara L Field, Inga F Sidor, Woutrina A Smith
We characterize Brucella infection in a wild southern sea otter ( Enhydra lutris nereis) with osteolytic lesions similar to those reported in other marine mammals and humans. This otter stranded twice along the central California coast over a 1-yr period and was handled extensively at two wildlife rehabilitation facilities, undergoing multiple surgeries and months of postsurgical care. Ultimately the otter was euthanized due to severe, progressive neurologic disease. Necropsy and postmortem radiographs revealed chronic, severe osteoarthritis spanning the proximal interphalangeal joint of the left hind fifth digit...
February 2, 2017: Journal of Wildlife Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149693/effects-of-groundwater-abstraction-on-two-keystone-tree-species-in-an-arid-savanna-national-park
#12
Eleanor Shadwell, Edmund February
BACKGROUND: In arid systems with no surface water, deep boreholes in ephemeral river beds provide for humans and animals. With continually increasing infrastructure development for tourism in arid wildlife parks such as the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in southern Africa, we ask what effects increased abstraction may have on large trees. Large trees in arid savannas perform essential ecosystem services by providing food, shade, nesting sites and increased nutrients for many other plant and animal species and for this are regarded as keystone species...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149689/polymorphism-in-the-major-histocompatibility-complex-mhc-class-ii-b-genes-of-the-rufous-backed-bunting-emberiza-jankowskii
#13
Dan Li, Keping Sun, Yunjiao Zhao, Aiqing Lin, Shi Li, Yunlei Jiang, Jiang Feng
Genetic diversity is one of the pillars of conservation biology research. High genetic diversity and abundant genetic variation in an organism may be suggestive of capacity to adapt to various environmental changes. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is known to be highly polymorphic and plays an important role in immune function. It is also considered an ideal model system to investigate genetic diversity in wildlife populations. The Rufous-backed Bunting (Emberiza jankowskii) is an endangered species that has experienced a sharp decline in both population and habitat size...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28122598/novel-chlamydiales-genotypes-identified-in-ticks-from-australian-wildlife
#14
Delaney Burnard, Haylee Weaver, Amber Gillett, Joanne Loader, Cheyne Flanagan, Adam Polkinghorne
BACKGROUND: Members of the order Chlamydiales are known for their potential as human and veterinary bacterial pathogens. Despite this recognition, epidemiological factors such as routes of transmission are yet to be fully defined. Ticks are well known vectors for many other infections with several reports recently describing the presence of bacteria in the order Chlamydiales in these arthropods. Australian wildlife are hosts to an extensive range of tick species. Evidence is also growing that the marsupial hosts these ticks parasitise can also be infected by a number of bacteria in the order Chlamydiales, with at least one species, Chlamydia pecorum, posing a significant conservation threat...
January 26, 2017: Parasites & Vectors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120950/fencing-bodes-a-rapid-collapse-of-the-unique-greater-mara-ecosystem
#15
Mette Løvschal, Peder Klith Bøcher, Jeppe Pilgaard, Irene Amoke, Alice Odingo, Aggrey Thuo, Jens-Christian Svenning
With land privatization and fencing of thousands of hectares of communal grazing areas, East Africa is struggling with one of the most radical cultural and environmental changes in its history. The 668,500-hectare Greater Mara is of crucial importance for the great migrations of large mammals and for Maasai pastoralist culture. However, the magnitude and pace of these fencing processes in this area are almost completely unknown. We provide new evidence that fencing is appropriating land in this area at an unprecedented and accelerating speed and scale...
January 25, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28103269/wildlife-population-dynamics-in-human-dominated-landscapes-under-community-based-conservation-the-example-of-nakuru-wildlife-conservancy-kenya
#16
Joseph O Ogutu, Bernard Kuloba, Hans-Peter Piepho, Erustus Kanga
Wildlife conservation is facing numerous and mounting challenges on private and communal lands in Africa, including in Kenya. We analyze the population dynamics of 44 common wildlife species in relation to rainfall variation in the Nakuru Wildlife Conservancy (NWC), located in the Nakuru-Naivasha region of Kenya, based on ground total counts carried out twice each year from March 1996 to May 2015. Rainfall in the region was quasi-periodic with cycle periods dependent on the rainfall component and varying from 2...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092422/international-consensus-principles-for-ethical-wildlife-control
#17
Sara Dubois, Nicole Fenwick, Erin A Ryan, Liv Baker, Sandra E Baker, Ngaio J Beausoleil, Scott Carter, Barbara Cartwright, Federico Costa, Chris Draper, John Griffin, Adam Grogan, Gregg Howald, Bidda Jones, Kate E Littin, Amanda T Lombard, David J Mellor, Daniel Ramp, Catherine A Schuppli, David Fraser
Human-wildlife conflicts are commonly addressed by excluding, relocating, or lethally controlling animals with the goal of preserving public health and safety, protecting property, or conserving other valued wildlife. However, declining wildlife populations, a lack of efficacy of control methods in achieving desired outcomes, and changes in how people value animals have triggered widespread acknowledgment of the need for ethical and evidence-based approaches to managing such conflicts. We explored international perspectives on and experiences with human-wildlife conflicts to develop principles for ethical wildlife control...
January 16, 2017: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080996/mitigating-amphibian-chytridiomycoses-in-nature
#18
REVIEW
Trenton W J Garner, Benedikt R Schmidt, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Erin Muths, Andrew A Cunningham, Che Weldon, Matthew C Fisher, Jaime Bosch
Amphibians across the planet face the threat of population decline and extirpation caused by the disease chytridiomycosis. Despite consensus that the fungal pathogens responsible for the disease are conservation issues, strategies to mitigate their impacts in the natural world are, at best, nascent. Reducing risk associated with the movement of amphibians, non-amphibian vectors and other sources of infection remains the first line of defence and a primary objective when mitigating the threat of disease in wildlife...
December 5, 2016: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080899/health-and-nutritional-assessment-of-free-ranging-eastern-indigo-snakes-drymarchon-couperi-in-georgia-united-states
#19
S Emmanuelle Knafo, Terry M Norton, Mark Mitchell, Dirk J Stevenson, Natalie Hyslop, Robert Poppenga, Marcie Oliva, Tai Chen, Carolyn Cray, Samantha E J Gibbs, Lance Durden, Nancy Stedman, Stephen Divers, Ellen Dierenfeld
Clinical pathology and nutritional parameters are useful in evaluating and monitoring threatened and endangered wildlife populations, but reference ranges for most snake species are lacking. From 2001 to 2005, health assessments were performed on 58 eastern indigo snakes (EIS) (Drymarchon couperi) captured in the wild in southeastern Georgia, United States. Health and nutritional assessments performed included hematology, serum biochemistry, fat-soluble vitamins, heavy metals, pesticide contaminants, parasitology, and surveys of other pathogens...
December 2016: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079086/conservation-effects-of-wildlife-trade-mapped
#20
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Nature
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