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Anticoagulation antidotes

Lai Heng Lee
The group of new oral anticoagulants or NOACs, now termed direct oral anticoagulants or DOACs, with their favourable results from large scale phase III clinical trials, represent a major advancement and expanded armamentarium in antithrombotic therapy. Dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are now in clinical routine use for prevention and treatment of arterial and venous thrombotic diseases as addressed in their clinical trials. Usage of the DOACs is expected to increase as clinicians gain more experience and reassurance with data from the real world studies which are generally consistent with that from clinical trials...
2016: Thrombosis Journal
L Deville, M Konan, A Hij, L Goldwirt, O Peyrony, F Fieux, P Faure, I Madelaine, S Villiers, D Farge-Bancel, C Frère
Direct oral anticoagulants (DAOC) are indicated for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Given their advantages and friendly use for patient, the prescription of long term DOAC therapy has rapidly increased both as first line treatment while initiating anticoagulation and as a substitute to vitamins K antagonist (VKA) in poorly controlled patients. However, DOAC therapy can also be associated with significant bleeding complications, and in the absence of specific antidote at disposal, treatment of serious hemorrhagic complications under DOAC remains complex...
July 2016: Current Research in Translational Medicine
Clemens Feistritzer, Stefan Schmidt
During the 57(th) annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology 2015 in Orlando, Florida, various aspects in the field of hemostaseology were presented. The Choosing Wisely® campaign pointed out the importance of the critical use of diagnostic tools to rule out pulmonary embolism and questioned the relevance of thrombophilia testing in women undergoing routine infertility evaluation. Furthermore, the approval of idarucizumab, a specific antidote for the reversal of the anticoagulant effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, was highlighted...
2016: Memo
P Gueret, S Combe, C Krezel, E Fuseau, P L M van Giersbergen, M Petitou, E Neuhart
INTRODUCTION: EP217609 is a representative of a new class of synthetic parenteral anticoagulants with a dual mechanism of action. It combines in a single molecule a direct thrombin inhibitor and an indirect factor Xa inhibitor. EP217609 can be neutralized by a specific antidote avidin, which binds to the biotin moiety of EP217609. PURPOSE: The primary objective was to assess the neutralization of EP217609 by avidin in healthy subjects. Secondary objectives were to define the optimal avidin monomer/EP217609 molar ratio to achieve an adequate neutralization of EP217609 and to assess the safety and tolerability of EP217609 and avidin...
October 15, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Nasim Shahidi Hamedani, Heiko Rühl, Julia Janina Zimmermann, Tim Heiseler, Johannes Oldenburg, Günter Mayer, Bernd Pötzsch, Jens Müller
Activated protein C (APC) is a critical regulator of thrombin formation and thereby protects against thrombosis. On the other hand, overwhelming formation of APC increases the risk of bleeding such as in trauma-induced coagulopathy. Thus, pharmacological inhibition of APC activity may improve blood clottability in certain clinical situations. In this study, we demonstrate that the DNA aptamer HS02-52G binds with fast onset (1.118 ± 0.013 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) to APC and possesses a long residence time of 13...
October 13, 2016: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics
Zavyalova Elena, Golovin Andrey, Pavlova Galina, Kopylov Alexey
Blood hemostasis is attained with two sophisticated interconnected network systems, a coagulation cascade and a platelet activation system. Multiple inhibitors were developed to various components of both systems to prevent thrombosis-related morbid events that are of extremely high frequency in the human population. Antithrombotic inhibitors possess both positive and negative aspects. One of the essential modern requirements is a controllable mode of action for both anticoagulants and antiplatelets that could be achieved due to the high affinity and specificity of the inhibitor, as well as a possibility to apply an antidote, which quickly annihilates activity of the inhibitor and restores the proper hemostasis...
October 4, 2016: Current Pharmaceutical Design
Frederik Uttenthal Larsen, Anne-Mette Hvas, Erik Lerkevang Grove
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are alternatives to vitamin K antagonists and provide consistent anticoagulation with equal or better clinical outcome and no need for routine monitoring. Bleeding is a feared complication of anticoagulants. Until recently, no specific agent has been available for reversal of NOACs. Idarucizumab binds dabigatran for rapid reversal of its activity without procoagulant effects. Andexanet alpha (expected release in 2016) and PER977 are antidotes under clinical development...
October 3, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
Andrea Morotti, Joshua N Goldstein
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are an attractive therapeutic option for anticoagulant treatment in the setting of venous thromboembolism or non-valvular atrial fibrillation. These drugs overall appear to have a lower risk of life-threatening hemorrhage than the vitamin K antagonists. In addition, they demonstrate more predictable and stable pharmacokinetics. Measurement of the degree of anticoagulation is desirable in patients with DOAC-associated hemorrhage, but commonly available coagulation assays show poor sensitivity for degree of DOAC effect...
November 2016: Current Treatment Options in Neurology
Stefan Hofer, Christoph Philipsenburg, Markus A Weigand, Thorsten Brenner
Dabigatran etexilate is a direct oral anticoagulant used for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a recently approved specific antidote that reverses the effect of dabigatran within minutes. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient with traumatic retroperitoneal arterial bleeding under anticoagulation with dabigatran etexilate. By administration of idarucizumab, we successfully normalized coagulation and saved the patient from an operation. In the course of the disease, a slight reincrease in dabigatran etexilate plasma levels was observed 2 days after the reversal, which could lead to a new onset of bleeding...
September 23, 2016: A & A Case Reports
Marc Maegele, Oliver Grottke, Herbert Schöchl, Oliver A Sakowitz, Michael Spannagl, Jürgen Koscielny
BACKGROUND: Direct (non-vitamin-K-dependent) oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are given as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) to prevent stroke and embolic disease in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not due to pathology of the heart valves. Fatal hemorrhage is rarer when DOACs are given (nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 0.48; 0.96], and venous thromboembolism: OR 0.54; [0.22; 1.32]). 48% of emergency trauma patients need an emergency operation or early surgery...
September 5, 2016: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Daniela Pelclová, Sergey Zakharov
UNLABELLED: Methanol mass poisoning occurs across the world quite frequently, but the complete clinical and laboratory data of the patients are only rarely available. Approximately 138 cases of poisoning were documented in the Czech Republic, 107 patients were hospitalized. Another 31 persons died out of hospital. About 60 % of the hospitalized patients survived intoxication without consequences, one half of the remaining 40 % died and the other half survived with the CNS and/or sight impaired...
2016: Vnitr̆ní Lékar̆ství
N G Khorev, A P Momot, V O Kon'kova
During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation)...
2016: Angiologii︠a︡ i Sosudistai︠a︡ Khirurgii︠a︡, Angiology and Vascular Surgery
Martin B Steed, Matthew T Swanson
The new direct oral anticoagulants-dabigatran etexilate, rivaroxaban, and apixaban- have predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles and are alternatives to warfarin. However, many surgeons are wary of these drugs, as there is limited evidence on how to manage bleeding in patients taking them, and only recently has a specific antidote been developed to reverse their anticoagulant effect. Management of the newer agents requires careful adherence to primary measures of bleeding care, knowledge of their mechanism of action, and familiarity with the unapproved and untested reversal strategies that may be required in patients with life-threatening bleeding...
November 2016: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinics of North America
Laurent Macle, John Cairns, Kori Leblanc, Teresa Tsang, Allan Skanes, Jafna L Cox, Jeff S Healey, Alan Bell, Louise Pilote, Jason G Andrade, L Brent Mitchell, Clare Atzema, David Gladstone, Mike Sharma, Subodh Verma, Stuart Connolly, Paul Dorian, Ratika Parkash, Mario Talajic, Stanley Nattel, Atul Verma
The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Guidelines Committee provides periodic reviews of new data to produce focused updates that address clinically important advances in AF management. This 2016 Focused Update deals with: (1) the management of antithrombotic therapy for AF patients in the context of the various clinical presentations of coronary artery disease; (2) real-life data with non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (3) the use of antidotes for the reversal of non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants; (4) digoxin as a rate control agent; (5) perioperative anticoagulation management; and (6) AF surgical therapy including the prevention and treatment of AF after cardiac surgery...
October 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Zaheer Ahmed, Seemeen Hassan, Gary A Salzman
Warfarin was the only oral anticoagulant available for the treatment of venous thromboembolism for about half a century until the recent approval of novel oral agents dabigatran, rivoraxaban and apixaban. This presents new classes of medications less cumbersome to use. They do not require frequent laboratory monitoring or have nurmerous drug interactions. On the other hand it also poses a challenge to the physicians deciding which agent to use in specific patient populations, how to predict the bleeding risk compared to warfarin and between the different novel agents and how to manage bleeding with relatively recent discovery of few potential antidotes...
April 2016: Current Drug Therapy
Mario Barbosa, Luiz Menezes Falcão
Direct oral anticoagulants emerge as the most innovative and promising drug toward preventing and treating cardiovascular disease, raising great interest among the scientific community. Numerous studies and meta-analysis generated much data clarifying clinicians' doubts; however, uncertainties remain regarding their use in particular groups such as patients with prosthetic valves, in valvular atrial fibrillation (defined as atrial fibrillation related to mitral rheumatic heart disease or prosthetic heart valves), among the elderly, in paraneoplastic thromboembolism, in pulmonary embolism with hemodynamic compromise, and scarcity of specific antidotes...
August 29, 2016: American Journal of Therapeutics
Kelly C Rogers, Melanie P Shelton, Shannon W Finks
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), originally developed as an alternative for vitamin K antagonists, are shifting the landscape of antithrombotic therapy. DOACs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban offer enhancements in safety, convenience, and efficacy compared with warfarin. However, as choices for oral anticoagulation therapy have increased, so has the need for effectual antidotes before urgent surgical procedures and for the reversal of serious adverse events caused by DOACs. To date, one antidote has been FDA approved in the United States for the reversal of dabigatran, and two antidotes are undergoing phase 2and 3clinical trials...
November 2016: Cardiology in Review
Antonio Bellasi, Luca Di Lullo, Gianvincenzo Melfa, Claudio Minoretti, Carlo Ratti, Carlo Campana, Maurizio Volpi, Stefano Mangano, Biagio Di Iorio, Mario Cozzolino
The new or direct oral anticoagulants [new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) or direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC)] were launched in the Italian market in 2013. Although these compounds share common pharmacological indications with vitamin K antagonists (warfarin or acenocumarol), they have different mechanisms of action, do not require a constant anticoagulant monitoring but are more efficacious and safer than vitamin K antagonists. The use of these molecules (Dabigatran, Apixaban, Rivaroxaban, Betrixaban, Edoxaban) is constantly rising in daily practice...
July 2016: Giornale Italiano di Nefrologia: Organo Ufficiale Della Società Italiana di Nefrologia
Marcel Levi
BACKGROUND: Recently, a new generation of direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors was introduced based on encouraging results for efficacy and safety in clinical studies. An initial limitation of these new drugs was the absence of an adequate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs or an urgent invasive procedure has to be carried out. MAIN TEXT: Specific reversing agents for DOACs have become available, however, and are now evaluated in clinical studies...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Boris Arbit, Marin Nishimura, Jonathan C Hsu
For several decades the vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants were the only outpatient therapy that existed to reduce the risk of stroke and thromboembolism. When the new direct oral anticoagulants were approved for use and addressed many of the issues associated with oral vitamin K antagonists, a new concern arose-the lack of rapid ability to reverse these agents. Physicians and patients were concerned that in cases of life-threatening bleeding or need for emergent surgery, an antidote to reverse the anticoagulation effect of these agents did not exist...
November 15, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
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