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Brain illness

David J Bond, Ana C Andreazza, John Hughes, Taj Dhanoa, Ivan J Torres, Jan-Marie Kozicky, L Trevor Young, Raymond W Lam, Lakshmi N Yatham
OBJECTIVE: There is a bidirectional relationship between obesity and mood disorders, with each increasing the risk of developing the other. This relationship suggests that they have overlapping pathophysiologic mechanisms. Adipose tissue-derived hormones, or adipokines, regulate appetite and metabolism and have activity in limbic brain regions, making them potential shared etiologic factors between elevated body mass index (BMI) and mood disorders. However, the precise relationships between BMI, mood, and adipokines are unknown...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
C Shah, W Zhang, Y Xiao, L Yao, Y Zhao, X Gao, L Liu, J Liu, S Li, B Tao, Z Yan, Y Fu, Q Gong, S Lui
Studies of schizophrenia at drug-naive state and on antipsychotic medication have reported a number of regions of gray-matter (GM) abnormalities but the reports have been inconsistent. The aim of this study was to conduct multimodal meta-analysis to compare the cross-sectional voxel-based morphometry studies of brain GM in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia (AN-FES) and those with antipsychotic treatment within 1 year (AT-FES) to determine the similarities and differences in these groups. We conducted two separate meta-analyses containing 24 studies with a sample size of 801 patients and 957 healthy controls...
October 25, 2016: Psychological Medicine
C H de Kogel, E J M C Westgeest
In this contribution an empirical approach is used to gain more insight into the relationship between neuroscience and criminal law. The focus is on case law in the Netherlands. Neuroscientific information and techniques have found their way into the courts of the Netherlands. Furthermore, following an Italian case in which a mentally ill offender received a penalty reduction in part because of a 'genetic vulnerability for impulsive aggression', the expectation was expressed that such 'genetic defenses' would appear in the Netherlands too...
November 2015: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
Sanjay Gambhir, Mritunjai Kumar, Mudalsha Ravina, Sanjeev Kumar Bhoi, Jayantee Kalita, U K Misra
OBJECTIVE: To study the role of (18)fluoro-deoxy glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) scan in documenting the disease burden in patients with tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and compare these findings with conventional imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ten patients with definite TBM were prospectively recruited. The severity of TBM was graded into stage I to III. The patients were subjected to whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT imaging and MRI brain...
November 15, 2016: Journal of the Neurological Sciences
Vishal Kothari, Yuwen Luo, Talia Tornabene, Ann Marie O'Neill, Michael W Greene, Geetha Thangiah, Jeganathan Ramesh Babu
High fat diet-induced obesity is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and other chronic, diet related illnesses, including dementia. Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, and is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in brain. This study was designed to determine whether diet-induced changes in peripheral insulin sensitivity could contribute to alterations in brain insulin signaling and cognitive functions. Four week old, male C57BL/6NHsd mice were randomly assigned a high fat diet (40% energy from fat) with 42g/L liquid sugar (HFS) added to the drinking water or a normal chow diet (12% energy from fat) for 14weeks...
October 19, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Lisa M James, Brian E Engdahl, Arthur C Leuthold, Apostolos P Georgopoulos
BACKGROUND: We recently reported that six alleles from class II genes of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) confer protection from Gulf War Illness (GWI) (Georgopoulos et al., 2015). The most significant effect is exerted on Neurological-Cognitive-Mood (NCM), Pain, and Fatigue symptoms, such that higher number of copies of the protective alleles are associated with lower symptom severity. Here we tested the hypothesis that this effect is exerted by modulating the strength of neural synchronicity...
October 14, 2016: EBioMedicine
Jessica M Healy, M Catherine Burgess, Tai-Ho Chen, W Thane Hancock, Karrie-Ann E Toews, Magele Scott Anesi, Ray T Tulafono, Mary Aseta Mataia, Benjamin Sili, Jacqueline Solaita, A Christian Whelen, Rebecca Sciulli, Remedios B Gose, Vasiti Uluiviti, Morgan Hennessey, Fara Utu, Motusa Tuileama Nua, Marc Fischer
During December 2015-January 2016, the American Samoa Department of Health (ASDoH) detected through surveillance an increase in the number of cases of acute febrile rash illness. Concurrently, a case of laboratory-confirmed Zika virus infection, a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection documented to cause microcephaly and other severe brain defects in some infants born to women infected during pregnancy (1,2) was reported in a traveler returning to New Zealand from American Samoa. In the absence of local laboratory capacity to test for Zika virus, ASDoH initiated arboviral disease control measures, including public education and vector source reduction campaigns...
October 21, 2016: MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
Rachael E C Schutz, Heather L Coats, Ruth A Engelberg, J Randall Curtis, Claire J Creutzfeldt
BACKGROUND: Patients with severe acute brain injury (SABI) raise important palliative care considerations associated with sudden devastating injury and uncertain prognosis. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to explore how family members, nurses, and physicians experience the palliative and supportive care needs of patients with SABI receiving care in the neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU). DESIGN: Semistructured interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Palliative Medicine
Guy Bar-Klein, Rebecca Klee, Claudia Brandt, Marion Bankstahl, Pablo Bascuñana, Kathrin Töllner, Hotjensa Dalipaj, Jens P Bankstahl, Alon Friedman, Wolfgang Löscher
OBJECTIVE: Acquired epilepsy is a devastating long-term risk of various brain insults, including trauma, stroke, infections, and status epilepticus (SE). There is no preventive treatment for patients at risk. Due to the complex alterations involved in epileptogenesis, it is likely that multi-targeted approaches are required for epilepsy prevention. We report novel preclinical findings with isoflurane, which exerts various non-anesthetic effects that may be relevant for anti-epileptogenesis...
October 19, 2016: Annals of Neurology
Karan Seegobin, Kamille Abdool, Kanterpersad Ramcharan, Haramnauth Dyaanand, Fidel Rampersad
We describe a case of Parry Romberg syndrome/en coupe de sabre in a woman whose disease started as seizures at age 8 but was diagnosed at the age 39. During these 31 years she got married, completed a first degree at university, had two successful pregnancies and has been gainfully employed. The features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, autoimmune abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, morphea en coup de sabre and brain imaging abnormalities were present. Areas of parietal lobe cerebral calcification were encountered on the computed tomographic scan and bilateral periventricular white matter changes on the magnetic resonance imaging with frontal, temporal and parietal lobe brain atrophy ipsilateral to the facial hemiatrophy...
September 30, 2016: Neurology International
Victoria A McCredie, Simone Piva, Marlene Santos, Wei Xiong, Airton Leonardo de Oliveira Manoel, Andrea Rigamonti, Gregory M T Hare, Martin G Chapman, Andrew J Baker
BACKGROUND: There are a range of opinions on the benefits and thresholds for the transfusion of red blood cells in critically ill patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and an urgent need to understand the neurophysiologic effects. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of red blood cell transfusions on cerebral tissue oxygenation (SctO2) in critically ill TBI patients. METHODS: This prospective observational study enrolled consecutive TBI patients with anemia requiring transfusion...
October 18, 2016: Neurocritical Care
Serena Ricci, Elia Guadagno, Dario Bruzzese, Marialaura Del Basso De Caro, Carmela Peca, Francesco G Sgulò, Francesco Maiuri, Angelina Di Carlo
The basement membrane collagen IV-degrading matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMPs) are most often linked to the malignant phenotype of tumor cells by playing a critical role in invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and vasculogenesis. We verified the activity of these two MMPs in the sera of patients affected by brain tumors (20 gliomas, 28 meningiomas and 20 metastasis) by zymography. The sera of 25 healthy volunteers with no concomitant illnesses were used for controls. Zymography showed four dominant gelatinolytic bands of 240, 130, 92 (MMP-9) and 72 (MMP-2) kDa...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neuro-oncology
Nam-In Kang, Jong-Il Park, Yong-Ku Kim, Jong-Chul Yang
OBJECTIVE: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the most abundant and important neurotrophins, is known to be involved in the development, survival, maintenance, and plasticity of neurons in the nervous system. Some studies have suggested that BDNF may play a role in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric illnesses such as depression and schizophrenia. Similarly, it is likely that the alteration of BDNF may be associated with the neuro-modulation that contributes to the development of somatization disorder...
September 2016: Psychiatry Investigation
Emily S Finn, R Todd Constable
Functional brain connectivity measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a popular technique for investigating neural organization in both healthy subjects and patients with mental illness. Despite a rapidly growing body of literature, however, functional connectivity research has yet to deliver biomarkers that can aid psychiatric diagnosis or prognosis at the single-subject level. One impediment to developing such practical tools has been uncertainty regarding the ratio of intra- to interindividual variability in functional connectivity; in other words, how much variance is state- versus trait-related...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Su Lui, Xiaohong Joe Zhou, John A Sweeney, Qiyong Gong
Unlike neurologic conditions, such as brain tumors, dementia, and stroke, the neural mechanisms for all psychiatric disorders remain unclear. A large body of research obtained with structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography, and optical imaging has demonstrated regional and illness-specific brain changes at the onset of psychiatric disorders and in individuals at risk for such disorders. Many studies have shown that psychiatric medications induce specific measurable changes in brain anatomy and function that are related to clinical outcomes...
November 2016: Radiology
Michael J Murray, Heidi DeBlock, Brian Erstad, Anthony Gray, Judi Jacobi, Che Jordan, William McGee, Claire McManus, Maureen Meade, Sean Nix, Andrew Patterson, M Karen Sands, Richard Pino, Ann Tescher, Richard Arbour, Bram Rochwerg, Catherine Friederich Murray, Sangeeta Mehta
OBJECTIVE: To update the 2002 version of "Clinical practice guidelines for sustained neuromuscular blockade in the adult critically ill patient." DESIGN: A Task Force comprising 17 members of the Society of Critical Medicine with particular expertise in the use of neuromuscular-blocking agents; a Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation expert; and a medical writer met via teleconference and three face-to-face meetings and communicated via e-mail to examine the evidence and develop these practice guidelines...
November 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Chrysanthi Fergani, Victor Navarro
Reproductive function is driven by the hormonal interplay between the gonads and brain-pituitary axis. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is released in a pulsatile manner, which is critical for the attainment and maintenance of fertility, however, GnRH neurons lack the ability to directly respond to most regulatory factors, and a hierarchical upstream neuronal network governs its secretion. We and others proposed a model in which Kiss1 neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), so called KNDy neurons, release kisspeptin (a potent GnRH secretagogue) in a pulsatile manner to drive GnRH pulses under the coordinated autosynaptic action of its cotransmitters, the tachykinin neurokinin B (NKB, stimulatory) and dynorphin (inhibitory)...
October 17, 2016: Reproduction: the Official Journal of the Society for the Study of Fertility
A Rumshisky, M Ghassemi, T Naumann, P Szolovits, V M Castro, T H McCoy, R H Perlis
The ability to predict psychiatric readmission would facilitate the development of interventions to reduce this risk, a major driver of psychiatric health-care costs. The symptoms or characteristics of illness course necessary to develop reliable predictors are not available in coded billing data, but may be present in narrative electronic health record (EHR) discharge summaries. We identified a cohort of individuals admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit between 1994 and 2012 with a principal diagnosis of major depressive disorder, and extracted inpatient psychiatric discharge narrative notes...
October 18, 2016: Translational Psychiatry
Nelson Trieu, Ryan Xia, Robert Loneragan, Lloyd Ridley, Joseph Trieu
INTRODUCTION: We report a series of patients who had computed tomography (CT) of their brains which showed an uncommon artefact caused by excess air bubbles in the cooling oil around the X-ray tube. METHODS: In November and December 2015, it was recognised that artefacts appearing on CT brain images acquired at our department were caused by a scanner fault. The test images were reviewed and the service engineer for the CT scanner was questioned about the artefact cause...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology
Murray Esler
The London physician and neuroanatomist Thomas Willis in the 17th century correctly attributed the source of emotions to the brain, not the heart as believed in antiquity. Contemporary research documents the phenomenon of "triggered" heart disease, when the autonomic nervous system control of the heart by the brain goes awry, producing heart disease of sudden onset, precipitated by acute emotional upheaval. This can take the form of, variously, cardiac arrhythmias, myocardial infarction, Takotsubo cardiomyopathy and sudden death...
October 14, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
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