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High flow nasal cannula oxygen

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429603/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-and-noninvasive-ventilation-on-reintubation-rate-in-adult-patients-after-extubation-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#1
Hua-Wei Huang, Xiu-Mei Sun, Zhong-Hua Shi, Guang-Qiang Chen, Lu Chen, Jan O Friedrich, Jian-Xin Zhou
PURPOSE: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) on reintubation in adult patients. PROCEDURES: Ovid Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched up to November 1, 2016, for RCTs comparing HFNC versus conventional oxygen therapy (COT) or noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in adult patients after extubation. The primary outcome was reintubation rate, and the secondary outcomes included complications, tolerance and comfort, time to reintubation, length of stay, and mortality...
January 1, 2017: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425965/comparison-of-cpap-and-hfnc-in-management-of-bronchiolitis-in-infants-and-young-children
#2
Majken Bisgaard Pedersen, Signe Vahlkvist
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used in infants with bronchiolitis for decades. Recently, high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was introduced We conducted a retrospective study of treatment with CPAP vs. HFNC between 2013 and 2015, comparing the development in respiratory rate, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and heart rate, treatment failure, duration of treatment, and length of hospital stay. A sample size of 49 children were included. Median age was 1.9 months. Median baseline pCO₂ was 7...
April 20, 2017: Children
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28415160/a-first-case-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-patients-with-pulmonary-tumor-thrombotic-microangiopathy
#3
Hyonsoo Joo, Do-Hyun Na, Jaeho Seung, Tong Yoon Kim, Gi June Min, Chin Kook Rhee
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 18, 2017: Korean Journal of Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400685/republication-all-india-difficult-airway-association-2016-guidelines-for-tracheal-intubation-in-the-intensive-care-unit
#4
Sheila Nainan Myatra, Syed Moied Ahmed, Pankaj Kundra, Rakesh Garg, Venkateswaran Ramkumar, Apeksh Patwa, Amit Shah, Ubaradka S Raveendra, Sumalatha Radhakrishna Shetty, Jeson Rajan Doctor, Dilip K Pawar, Singaravelu Ramesh, Sabyasachi Das, Jigeeshu Vasishtha Divatia
Tracheal intubation (TI) is a routine procedure in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and is often lifesaving. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room, critically ill patients with respiratory failure and shock are physiologically unstable. These factors, along with under evaluation of the airway and suboptimal response to preoxygenation, are responsible for a high incidence of life-threatening complications such as severe hypoxemia and cardiovascular collapse during TI in the ICU. The All India Difficult Airway Association (AIDAA) proposes a stepwise plan for safe management of the airway in critically ill patients...
March 2017: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399118/feasibility-and-physiological-effects-of-non-invasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-niv-nava-in-preterm-infants
#5
Christopher Gibu, Phillip Cheng, Raymond J Ward, Benjamin Castro, Gregory P Heldt
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist (NIV-NAVA) was introduced to our clinical practice via a pilot and a randomized observational study to assess its safety, feasibility, and short term physiological effects. METHODS: The pilot protocol applied NIV-NAVA to 11 infants on nasal CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), or nasal IMV (NIMV), in multiple 2-4 h periods of NIV-NAVA for comparison. This provided the necessary data to design a randomized, controlled observational cross-over study in 8 additional infants to compare the physiological effects of NIV-NAVA to NIMV during 2-hour steady state conditions...
April 11, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393433/nasal-high-flow-oxygen-delivery-in-children-with-abnormal-airways
#6
Susan Humphreys, Derek Rosen, Tessa Housden, Julia Taylor, Andreas Schibler
BACKGROUND: Transnasal Humidified Rapid-Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange has been shown to safely prolong the safe apnea time in well children post induction of anesthesia and is rapidly becoming a new standard for apneic oxygenation in adults. The same oxygenation technique is described as nasal high flow and can be used in infants and children at risk of apnea during anesthesia. AIM: We investigated the use of nasal high flow oxygen delivery during anesthesia in children with abnormal airways requiring tubeless airway assessment or surgery...
April 10, 2017: Paediatric Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28388254/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-palliative-care-330
#7
Nidhi Shah, Zankhana Mehta, Yatin Mehta
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 7, 2017: Journal of Palliative Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374554/letter-to-the-editor-regarding-the-article-introducing-high-flow-nasal-cannula-to-the-neonatal-transport-environment
#8
Andrew Brunton, Joyce O'Shea
We read with interest the above article by Boyle et al (1) regarding the use of High-flow nasal cannula oxygen during neonatal transport. We would like to congratulate the authors for a valuable article, and wish to add our experiences. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
April 4, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353318/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapies-for-respiratory-management-in-pediatric-patients
#9
Gang Liu, Conghai Fan, Hongwei Wu
High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is a non-invasive form of respiratory support that is rapidly being taken up in paediatric intensive care units (PICU). For infants with bronchiolitis - who are the largest non-elective source of admissions to a PICU - there is some evidence that using HFNC therapy reduces the need for intubation and mechanical ventilation. The aim of this review article is is to explore, describe, critique and add to the evidence surrounding the use of HFNC therapy in the pediatric population for the management of respiratory distress...
March 27, 2017: Minerva Pediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28351440/-high-nasal-flow-the-solution-for-hypoxaemia
#10
J G van den Aardweg
High nasal flow (HNF) is a new method to deliver a high flow of oxygen (up to 60 l/min) through a nasal cannula. The inspiratory oxygen fraction can be set in a range from 21 to 100%. The inspired air is adjusted to body temperature and saturation. Many patients find it more comfortable than a conventional oxygen mask. In spite of these advantages, the mechanism of action is not completely understood and empirical evidence for its use is limited. This article provides a simplified explanation of variable positive airway pressure generation by HNF and related flushing of the anatomic dead space...
2017: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Geneeskunde
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28333694/high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-beyond-the-perinatal-period
#11
Michael Lee, Joshua Nagler
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is emerging as a means of oxygen delivery and respiratory support for a range of conditions outside the perinatal period. We aim to review the mechanisms of action and advantages of HFNC and to summarize current findings regarding clinical benefit in specific pediatric disease processes and in patients with significant respiratory distress. RECENT FINDINGS: Currently published studies outside the neonatal population demonstrate both safety and efficacy of this mode of respiratory support...
March 22, 2017: Current Opinion in Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298878/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-for-patients-with-thoracoscopic-lobectomy-after-extubation
#12
Yuetian Yu, Xiaozhe Qian, Chunyan Liu, Cheng Zhu
Objective. To investigate whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy is superior to conventional oxygen therapy for reducing hypoxemia and postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) in patients with thoracoscopic lobectomy after extubation. Methods. Patients with intermediate to high risk for PPC were enrolled in this study. Subjects were randomly assigned to HFNC group (HFNCG) or conventional oxygen group (COG) following extubation. Arterial blood samples were collected after extubation at 1, 2, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h...
2017: Canadian Respiratory Journal: Journal of the Canadian Thoracic Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28292963/electrical-activity-of-the-diaphragm-during-ncpap-and-high-flow-nasal-cannula
#13
C G de Waal, G J Hutten, J V Kraaijenga, F H de Jongh, A H van Kaam
OBJECTIVE: To determine if the electrical activity of the diaphragm, as measure of neural respiratory drive and breathing effort, changes over time in preterm infants transitioned from nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) to high flow nasal cannula (HFNC). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING: Neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: Stable preterm infants transitioned from nCPAP to HFNC using a 1:1 pressure to flow ratio...
March 14, 2017: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Fetal and Neonatal Edition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28246239/effect-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-adults-with-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-a-meta-analysis-of-randomized-controlled-trials
#14
Xiaofeng Ou, Yusi Hua, Jin Liu, Cansheng Gong, Wenling Zhao
BACKGROUND: Conflicting recommendations exist on whether high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy should be administered to adult patients in critical care with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate its effect on intubation rates. METHODS: We searched electronic databases from inception to April 2016. We included RCTs that compared HFNC oxygen therapy with usual care (conventional oxygen therapy or noninvasive ventilation) in adults with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure...
February 21, 2017: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28246238/high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-acute-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-proceed-with-caution
#15
Shailesh Bihari, Andrew D Bersten
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 21, 2017: CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, Journal de L'Association Medicale Canadienne
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219186/-pay-attention-to-a-new-technique-for-treatment-of-respiratory-failure-warmed-and-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygenation
#16
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 7, 2017: Zhonghua Yi Xue za Zhi [Chinese medical journal]
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203744/acute-postoperative-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure-as-a-result-of-chilaiditi-s-syndrome-contribution-of-high-flow-oxygen-through-nasal-cannula
#17
S Poignant, J Moënne-Loccoz, B Cohen, M Laffon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 1, 2017: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196293/developing-a-better-and-practical-definition-of-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia
#18
LETTER
Sascha Meyer, Axel R Franz, Johannes Bay, Ludwig Gortner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 14, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174331/humidity-and-inspired-oxygen-concentration-during-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-neonatal-and-infant-lung-models
#19
Yusuke Chikata, Saki Ohnishi, Masaji Nishimura
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) for neonate/infants can deliver up to 10 L/min of heated and humidified gas, and FIO2 can be adjusted to between 0.21 and 1.0. With adults, humidification and actual FIO2 are known to vary according to inspiratory and HFNC gas flow, tidal volume (VT), and ambient temperature. There have been few studies focused on humidification and FIO2 in HFNC settings for neonates/infants, so we performed a bench study to investigate the influence of gas flow, ambient temperature, and respiratory parameters on humidification and actual FIO2 in a neonate/infant simulation...
February 7, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28161016/high-flow-warm-humidified-oxygen-versus-standard-low-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-for-moderate-bronchiolitis-hfwho-rct-an-open-phase-4-randomised-controlled-trial
#20
Elizabeth Kepreotes, Bruce Whitehead, John Attia, Christopher Oldmeadow, Adam Collison, Andrew Searles, Bernadette Goddard, Jodi Hilton, Mark Lee, Joerg Mattes
BACKGROUND: Bronchiolitis is the most common lung infection in infants and treatment focuses on management of respiratory distress and hypoxia. High-flow warm humidified oxygen (HFWHO) is increasingly used, but has not been rigorously studied in randomised trials. We aimed to examine whether HFWHO provided enhanced respiratory support, thereby shortening time to weaning off oxygen. METHODS: In this open, phase 4, randomised controlled trial, we recruited children aged less than 24 months with moderate bronchiolitis attending the emergency department of the John Hunter Hospital or the medical unit of the John Hunter Children's Hospital in New South Wales, Australia...
March 4, 2017: Lancet
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