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High flow nasal cannula oxygen

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773297/the-clinical-practice-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-in-adults-a-japanese-cross-sectional-multicenter-survey
#1
Jiro Ito, Kazuma Nagata, Susumu Sato, Akira Shiraki, Naoki Nishimura, Shinyu Izumi, Ryo Tachikawa, Takeshi Morimoto, Keisuke Tomii
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) is widely used mainly in the acute care setting, but limited data are available on real-world practice in adults. The objective of this study was to describe HFNC practices in Japanese adults. METHODS: A retrospective cross-sectional multicenter survey of adult patients receiving HFNC from January through March 2015 was conducted in 33 participating hospitals in Japan. RESULTS: We obtained information on 321 patients (median age, 76; 218 men, 103 women; median estimated PaO2 /FI O2, 178 mm Hg) from 22 hospitals...
May 2018: Respiratory Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29743098/impact-of-flow-and-temperature-on-patient-comfort-during-respiratory-support-by-high-flow-nasal-cannula
#2
Tommaso Mauri, Alessandro Galazzi, Filippo Binda, Laura Masciopinto, Nadia Corcione, Eleonora Carlesso, Marta Lazzeri, Elena Spinelli, Daniela Tubiolo, Carlo Alberto Volta, Ileana Adamini, Antonio Pesenti, Giacomo Grasselli
BACKGROUND: The high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) delivers up to 60 l/min of humidified air/oxygen blend at a temperature close to that of the human body. In this study, we tested whether higher temperature and flow decrease patient comfort. In more severe patients, instead, we hypothesized that higher flow might be associated with improved comfort. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, cross-over study was performed on 40 acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) patients (PaO2 /FiO2  ≤ 300 + pulmonary infiltrates + exclusion of cardiogenic edema) supported by HFNC...
May 9, 2018: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29719796/use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-in-obese-patients-receiving-colonoscopy-under-intravenous-propofol-sedation-a-case-series
#3
Chi Chan Lee, Osman Perez, Faryal I Farooqi, Trupti Akella, Sameer Shaharyar, Melissa Elizee
Intravenous sedation during colonoscopy has become the standard practice in the United States given its higher patient satisfaction and procedural quality. This practice is not free of side effects as a significant proportion of patients undergoing this procedure tend to have respiratory depression and desaturation events. Obesity, as it relates to higher levels of body mass index (BMI) has a positive correlation with the incidence of hypoxemia. During colonoscopy High flow nasal cannula (HFNC) may potentially improve oxygen performance in patients receiving colonoscopy under intravenous sedation...
2018: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29713153/long-term-effects-of-oxygen-enriched-high-flow-nasal-cannula-treatment-in-copd-patients-with-chronic-hypoxemic-respiratory-failure
#4
Line Hust Storgaard, Hans-Ulrich Hockey, Birgitte Schantz Laursen, Ulla Møller Weinreich
Background: This study investigated the long-term effects of humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in COPD patients with chronic hypoxemic respiratory failure treated with long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT). Patients and methods: A total of 200 patients were randomized into usual care ± HFNC. At inclusion, acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) and hospital admissions 1 year before inclusion, modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) score, St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 ), 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2 ) were recorded...
2018: International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29685370/is-high-flow-nasal-cannula-more-effective-than-conventional-oxygen-therapy-for-preventing-escalation-of-respiratory-support-in-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure
#5
EDITORIAL
Brit Long, Michael D April
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 20, 2018: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29674770/incidence-of-pulmonary-complications-with-the-prophylactic-use-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-after-pediatric-cardiac-surgery-prophylactic-hfnc-study-protocol
#6
Naohiro Shioji, Tomoyuki Kanazawa, Tatsuo Iwasaki, Kazuyoshi Shimizu, Tomohiko Suemori, Hirokazu Kawase, Satoshi Kimura, Yasutoshi Kuroe, Hiroshi Morimatsu
We will investigate the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) with the prophylactic use of a high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) after pediatric cardiac surgery. Children < 48 months old with congenital heart disease for whom cardiac surgery is planned will be included. The HFNC procedure will be commenced just after extubation, at a flow rate of 2 L/kg/min with adequate oxygen concentration to achieve target oxygen saturation ≥ 94%. This study will reveal the prevalence of PPCs after pediatric cardiac surgery with the prophylactic use of HFNC...
April 2018: Acta Medica Okayama
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29643554/effectiveness-of-transnasal-humidified-rapid-insufflation-ventilatory-exchange-versus-traditional-preoxygenation-followed-by-apnoeic-oxygenation-in-delaying-desaturation-during-apnoea-a-preliminary-study
#7
Sunil Rajan, Nandhini Joseph, Pulak Tosh, Dilesh Kadapamannil, Jerry Paul, Lakshmi Kumar
Background and Aims: Transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) during apnoea has shown to delay desaturation. The primary objective was to compare time to desaturate to <90% during apnoea with THRIVE versus traditional preoxygenation followed by apnoeic oxygenation. Methods: This prospective, randomised, single-blinded study was conducted in 10 adult patients presenting for direct laryngoscopy under general anaesthesia without endotracheal intubation...
March 2018: Indian Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29607161/effectiveness-of-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-for-acute-respiratory-failure-with-hypercapnia
#8
Eun Sun Kim, Hongyeul Lee, Se Joong Kim, Jisoo Park, Yeon Joo Lee, Jong Sun Park, Ho Il Yoon, Jae Ho Lee, Choon-Taek Lee, Young-Jae Cho
Background: Heated and humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy has recently been introduced for hypoxic respiratory failure. However, it has not been well-evaluated for acute respiratory failure with hypercapnia. Methods: This retrospective study included acute respiratory failure patients with hypercapnia in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) from April 2011 to February 2013, who required HFNC oxygen therapy for hypoxemia. Respiratory parameters were recorded and arterial blood gas analyses conducted before, and at 1 and 24 h after initiation of HFNC oxygen therapy...
February 2018: Journal of Thoracic Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29590671/primary-graft-dysfunction-pgd-following-lung-transplantation
#9
Rupal J Shah, Joshua M Diamond
Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a form of acute lung injury that results from ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and is the major cause of early posttransplant morbidity and mortality. Patients who survive PGD have decreased quality of life, an increased risk of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, specifically bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, and a significantly increased risk of death. In 2017, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation released updated consensus statements on the PGD definition, most up-to-date PGD risk factors, mechanisms of PGD development, and the state-of-the-art for PGD therapeutics...
April 2018: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29562151/a-randomized-trial-of-high-flow-oxygen-therapy-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#10
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Donna Franklin, Franz E Babl, Luregn J Schlapbach, Ed Oakley, Simon Craig, Jocelyn Neutze, Jeremy Furyk, John F Fraser, Mark Jones, Jennifer A Whitty, Stuart R Dalziel, Andreas Schibler
BACKGROUND: High-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula has been increasingly used in infants with bronchiolitis, despite limited high-quality evidence of its efficacy. The efficacy of high-flow oxygen therapy through a nasal cannula in settings other than intensive care units (ICUs) is unclear. METHODS: In this multicenter, randomized, controlled trial, we assigned infants younger than 12 months of age who had bronchiolitis and a need for supplemental oxygen therapy to receive either high-flow oxygen therapy (high-flow group) or standard oxygen therapy (standard-therapy group)...
March 22, 2018: New England Journal of Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29560073/nasal-cannula-apneic-oxygenation-prevents-desaturation-during-endotracheal-intubation-an-integrative-literature-review
#11
REVIEW
Joshua M Gleason, Bill R Christian, Erik D Barton
Patients requiring emergency airway management may be at greater risk of acute hypoxemic events because of underlying lung pathology, high metabolic demands, insufficient respiratory drive, obesity, or the inability to protect their airway against aspiration. Emergency tracheal intubation is often required before complete information needed to assess the risk of procedural hypoxia is acquired (i.e., arterial blood gas level, hemoglobin value, or chest radiograph). During pre-oxygenation, administering high-flow nasal oxygen in addition to a non-rebreather face mask can significantly boost the effective inspired oxygen...
March 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29531447/comparative-study-between-noninvasive-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-and-hot-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannulae-as-a-mode-of-respiratory-support-in-infants-with-acute-bronchiolitis-in-pediatric-intensive-care-unit-of-a-tertiary-care-hospital
#12
Mihir Sarkar, Rajasree Sinha, Satyabrata Roychowdhoury, Sobhanman Mukhopadhyay, Pramit Ghosh, Kalpana Dutta, Shibarjun Ghosh
Background: Early initiation of appropriate noninvasive respiratory support is utmost important intervention to avoid mechanical ventilation in severe bronchiolitis. Aim: This study aims to compare noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and hot humidified high-flow nasal cannulae (HHHFNC) as modes of respiratory support in infants with severe bronchiolitis. Methods: Prospective, randomized, open-label pilot study done in a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU)...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29530362/the-optiflow%C3%A2-interface-for-chronic-cpap-use-in-children
#13
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29528202/early-predictors-of-unresponsiveness-to-high-flow-nasal-cannula-therapy-in-a-pediatric-emergency-department
#14
Anıl Er, Aykut Çağlar, Fatma Akgül, Emel Ulusoy, Hale Çitlenbik, Durgül Yılmaz, Murat Duman
AIM: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a new treatment option for pediatric respiratory distress and we aimed to assess early predictive factors of unresponsiveness to HFNC therapy in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHOD: Patients who presented with respiratory distress and were treated by HFNC, were included. The age, gender, weight, medical history, diagnosis, vital signs, oxygen saturation/fraction of inspired oxygen (SpO2 /FiO2 ) ratio, modified Respiratory Distress Assessment Instrument (mRDAI) scores, medical interventions, duration of HFNC therapy, time to escalation, adverse effects, and laboratory test results were obtained from medical and nursing records...
March 12, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29506579/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-vs-standard-oxygen-therapy-in-immunocompromised-patients-with-acute-respiratory-failure-study-protocol-for-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#15
Elie Azoulay, Virginie Lemiale, Djamel Mokart, Saad Nseir, Laurent Argaud, Frédéric Pène, Loay Kontar, Fabrice Bruneel, Kada Klouche, François Barbier, Jean Reignier, Anabelle Stoclin, Guillaume Louis, Jean-Michel Constantin, Julien Mayaux, Florent Wallet, Achille Kouatchet, Vincent Peigne, Pierre Perez, Christophe Girault, Samir Jaber, Johanna Oziel, Martine Nyunga, Nicolas Terzi, Lila Bouadma, Christine Lebert, Alexandre Lautrette, Naike Bigé, Jean-Herlé Raphalen, Laurent Papazian, Antoine Rabbat, Michael Darmon, Sylvie Chevret, Alexandre Demoule
BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the leading reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission in immunocompromised patients. High-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy is an alternative to standard oxygen. By providing warmed and humidified gas, HFNO allows the delivery of higher flow rates via nasal cannula devices, with FiO2 values of nearly 100%. Benefits include alleviation of dyspnea and discomfort, decreased respiratory distress and decreased mortality in unselected patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure...
March 5, 2018: Trials
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29487038/a-flow-leak-correction-algorithm-for-pneumotachographic-work-of-breathing-measurement-during-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy
#16
Francesco Montecchia, Fabio Midulla, Paola Papoff
Measuring work of breathing (WOB) is an intricate task during high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy because the continuous unidirectional flow toward the patient makes pneumotachography technically difficult to use. We implemented a new method for measuring WOB based on a differential pneumotachography (DP) system, equipped with one pneumotachograph inserted in the HFNC circuit and another connected to a monitoring facemask, combined with a leak correction algorithm (LCA) that corrects flow measurement errors arising from leakage around the monitoring facemask...
April 2018: Medical Engineering & Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29457114/a-pediatric-case-developing-critical-abdominal-distension-caused-by-a-combination-of-humidified-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-and-nasal-airway
#17
Satoki Inoue, Yumiko Tamaki, Shota Sonobe, Junji Egawa, Masahiko Kawaguchi
Background: We describe a pediatric patient who suffered from critical abdominal distention caused by a combination of humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) oxygen therapy and nasal airway. Case presentation: A 21-month-old boy with a history of chronic lung disease was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Immediately after admission, his airway was established using a tracheal tube and mechanical ventilation was started. Five days after the commencement of mechanical ventilation, finally, his trachea was extubated...
2018: JA clinical reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29452816/transnasal-humidified-rapid-insufflation-ventilatory-exchange-for-oxygenation-of-children-during-apnoea-a-prospective-randomised-controlled-trial
#18
T Riva, T H Pedersen, S Seiler, N Kasper, L Theiler, R Greif, M Kleine-Brueggeney
BACKGROUND: Transnasal humidified rapid insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) comprises the administration of heated, humidified, and blended air/oxygen mixtures via nasal cannula at rates of ≥2 litres kg-1  min-1 . The aim of this randomized controlled study was to evaluate the length of the safe apnoea time using THRIVE with two different oxygen concentrations (100% vs 30% oxygen) compared with standard low-flow 100% oxygen administration. METHODS: Sixty patients, aged 1-6 yr, weighing 10-20 kg, undergoing general anaesthesia for elective surgery, were randomly allocated to receive one of the following oxygen administration methods during apnoea: 1) low-flow 100% oxygen at 0...
March 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432140/noise-exposure-from-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-therapy-a-bench-study-on-noise-reduction
#19
Takamitsu Kubo, Hiroaki Nakajima, Ryo Shimoda, Tatsuya Seo, Yurie Kanno, Toshikazu Kondo, Sunao Tamai
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) oxygen therapy produces noise at a level such that patients often complain. However, the noise level has not been measured digitally. METHODS: We evaluated 3 types of HFNCs without filters and 2 types with filters attached for noise reduction. Optiflow (with and without a filter), MaxVenturi (with and without a filter) and AIRVO2 (without a filter only) were positioned at the center of a hospital room. We measured the noise levels at the distance of 1 m from the equipment at various total flows (30, 40, 50, 60 L/min) and FIO2 (0...
March 2018: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29431543/high-flow-nasal-oxygen-therapy-utilization-7-year-experience-at-a-community-teaching-hospital
#20
Mihaela S Stefan, Patrick Eckert, Bogdan Tiru, Jennifer Friderici, Peter K Lindenauer, Jay S Steingrub
OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of high flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy (HFNC) between 2008 and 2014 in patients 18 years or older at a community teaching hospital. METHODS: Yearly utilization rates of HFNC, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) were calculated among admissions with a set of cardiopulmonary diagnoses (heart failure, COPD, asthma or pneumonia). RESULTS: Among the 41,711 admissions with at least one of the above cardiopulmonary condition, HFNC was utilized in 1,128 or 27...
April 2018: Hospital Practice (Minneapolis)
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