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Translational medicine

Marco Giardiello, Neill J Liptrott, Tom O McDonald, Darren Moss, Marco Siccardi, Phil Martin, Darren Smith, Rohan Gurjar, Steve P Rannard, Andrew Owen
Considerable scope exists to vary the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, with subsequent impact on biological interactions; however, no accelerated process to access large nanoparticle material space is currently available, hampering the development of new nanomedicines. In particular, no clinically available nanotherapies exist for HIV populations and conventional paediatric HIV medicines are poorly available; one current paediatric formulation utilizes high ethanol concentrations to solubilize lopinavir, a poorly soluble antiretroviral...
October 21, 2016: Nature Communications
Matthias Willmann, Silke Peter
The increasing threat of antimicrobial resistance poses one of the greatest challenges to modern medicine. The collection of all antimicrobial resistance genes carried by various microorganisms in the human body is called the human resistome and represents the source of resistance in pathogens that can eventually cause life-threatening and untreatable infections. A deep understanding of the human resistome and its multilateral interaction with various environments is necessary for developing proper measures that can efficiently reduce the spread of resistance...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Molecular Medicine: Official Organ of the "Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte"
In K Cho, Silun Wang, Hui Mao, Anthony Ws Chan
Recent advances in stem cell-based regenerative medicine, cell replacement therapy, and genome editing technologies (i.e. CRISPR-Cas 9) have sparked great interest in in vivo cell monitoring. Molecular imaging promises a unique approach to noninvasively monitor cellular and molecular phenomena, including cell survival, migration, proliferation, and even differentiation at the whole organismal level. Several imaging modalities and strategies have been explored for monitoring cell grafts in vivo. We begin this review with an introduction describing the progress in stem cell technology, with a perspective toward cell replacement therapy...
2016: American Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Nicoletta Staropoli, Domenico Ciliberto, Silvia Chiellino, Francesca Caglioti, Teresa Del Giudice, Simona Gualtieri, Angela Salvino, Alessandra Strangio, Cirino Botta, Sandro Pignata, Pierfrancesco Tassone, Pierosandro Tagliaferri
OBJECTIVES: The current gold-standard for the first-line treatment in IIIb/IV stages of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel plus bevacizumab in some countries. In the era of personalized medicine, there is still uncertainty on the impact of several molecularly targeted agents, which have been investigated for the management of this disease. To shed light on the actual role of targeted therapy in EOC, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed...
October 13, 2016: Oncotarget
Elin T G Kersten, Gerard H Koppelman
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although currently available drugs to treat asthma are effective in most patients, a proportion of patients do not respond or experience side-effects; which is partly genetically determined. Pharmacogenetics is the study of how genetic variations influence drug response. In this review, we summarize prior results and recent studies in pharmacogenetics to determine if we can use genetic profiles for personalized treatment of asthma. RECENT FINDINGS: The field of pharmacogenetics has moved from candidate gene studies in single populations toward genome-wide association studies and meta-analysis of multiple studies...
October 18, 2016: Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine
Vincent Ronfard, Alain Vertes, Michael May, Anne Dupraz, Mark van Dyke, Yves Bayon
"Evaluating the Past & Present of Regenerative Medicine (RM)" was the first part of an Industry Symposium dedicated to the subject during the 2015 World TERMIS Congress in Boston. This working session presented a critical review of the current RM landscape in Europe and North America with possible projections for the future. Interestingly, the RM development cycle seems to obey the Gartner hype cycle, now at the enlightenment phase, after past exaggerated expectations and discouragements, as suggested by increasing numbers of clinical trials and recent market approvals of RM solutions in both Europe (Glybera & Holoclar® from Chiesi Pharma and Strimvelis® from GSK) and Japan (Remestemcel-L from Mesoblast® )...
October 20, 2016: Tissue Engineering. Part B, Reviews
Y H Liu, Y Zhen
A manuscript of Tibetan medicine, P. t.1054, written on 4 pattra-leaf-like rectangular papers connected together, is collected in the Volume 10 of Dunhuang Tibetan Manuscripts Preserved in France Scroll. The contents on the front pages of the whole set is on pulse-taking of Tibetan medicine, and the back pages, on prescriptions containing 5 recipes of cathartics and medicinal oils, are included in 16 lines on the remained Scroll dealing with its ingredients, processing method, function and indications which can be differentiated into 5 units...
July 28, 2016: Zhonghua Yi Shi za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Medical History
J David Sweatt, Carol A Tamminga
This review concerns epigenetic mechanisms and their roles in conferring interindividual differences, especially as related to experientially acquired and genetically driven changes in central nervous system (CNS) function. In addition, the review contains commentary regarding the possible ways in which epigenomic changes may contribute to neuropsychiatric conditions and disorders and ways in which epigenotyping might be cross-correlated with clinical phenotyping in the context of precision medicine. The review begins with a basic description of epigenetic marking in the CNS and how these changes are powerful regulators of gene readout...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Anna C Need, David B Goldstein
Only a few years after its development, next-generation sequencing is rapidly becoming an essential part of clinical care for patients with serious neurological conditions, especially in the diagnosis of early-onset and severe presentations. Beyond this diagnostic role, there has been an explosion in definitive gene discovery in a range of neuropsychiatric diseases. This is providing new pointers to underlying disease biology and is beginning to outline a new framework for genetic stratification of neuropsychiatric disease, with clear relevance to both individual treatment optimization and clinical trial design...
September 2016: Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience
Martin Jastroch, Sylvain Giroud, Perry Barrett, Fritz Geiser, Gerhard Heldmaier, Annika Herwig
Endothermic mammals and birds require intensive energy turnover to sustain high body temperatures and metabolic rates. To cope with energetic bottlenecks associated with the change of seasons, and to minimise energy expenditure, complex mechanisms and strategies, such as daily torpor and hibernation, are used. During torpor metabolic depression and low body temperatures save energy. However, these bouts of torpor lasting for hours to weeks are interrupted by active 'euthermic' phases with high body temperatures...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neuroendocrinology
Abib Agbetoba, Amber Luong, Jin Keat Siow, Brent Senior, Claudio Callejas, Kornel Szczygielski, Martin J Citardi
BACKGROUND: Endoscopic sinus surgery represents a cornerstone in the professional development of otorhinolaryngology trainees. Mastery of these surgical skills requires an understanding of paranasal sinus and skull-base anatomy. The frontal sinus is associated with a wide range of variation and complex anatomical configuration, and thus represents an important challenge for all trainees performing endoscopic sinus surgery. METHODS: Forty-five otorhinolaryngology trainees and 20 medical school students from 5 academic institutions were enrolled and randomized into 1 of 2 groups...
October 18, 2016: International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology
Rae Woong Park
Big data indicates the large and ever-increasing volumes of data adhere to the following 4Vs: volume (ever-increasing amount), velocity (quickly generated), variety (many different types), veracity (from trustable sources). The last decade has seen huge advances in the amount of data we routinely generate and collect in pretty much everything we do, as well as our ability to use technology to analyze and understand it. The routine operation of modern health care systems also produces an abundance of electronically stored data on an ongoing basis as a byproduct of clinical practice...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Anna Dominiczak
Human primary or essential hypertension is a complex, polygenic trait with some 50% contribution from genes and environment. Richard Lifton and colleagues provided elegant dissection of several rare Mendelian forms of hypertension, exemplified by the glucocorticoid remediable aldosteronism and Liddle's syndrome. These discoveries illustrate that a single gene mutation can explain the entire pathogenesis of severe, early onset hypertension as well as dictating the best treatment.The dissection of the much more common polygenic hypertension has proven much more difficult...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Tristram A Lett, Henrik Walter, Eva J Brandl
Genetic variation underlies both the response to antidepressant treatment and the occurrence of side effects. Over the past two decades, a number of pharmacogenetic variants, among these the SCL6A4, BDNF, FKBP5, GNB3, GRIK4, and ABCB1 genes, have come to the forefront in this regard. However, small effects sizes, mixed results in independent samples, and conflicting meta-analyses results led to inherent difficulties in the field of pharmacogenetics translating these findings into clinical practice. Nearly all antidepressant pharmacogenetic variants have potentially pleiotropic effects in which they are associated with major depressive disorder, intermediate phenotypes involved in emotional processes, and brain areas affected by antidepressant treatment...
October 17, 2016: CNS Drugs
Michael V Lombardo, Meng-Chuan Lai, Bonnie Auyeung, Rosemary J Holt, Carrie Allison, Paula Smith, Bhismadev Chakrabarti, Amber N V Ruigrok, John Suckling, Edward T Bullmore, Christine Ecker, Michael C Craig, Declan G M Murphy, Francesca Happé, Simon Baron-Cohen
Individuals affected by autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are considerably heterogeneous. Novel approaches are needed to parse this heterogeneity to enhance precision in clinical and translational research. Applying a clustering approach taken from genomics and systems biology on two large independent cognitive datasets of adults with and without ASC (n = 694; n = 249), we find replicable evidence for 5 discrete ASC subgroups that are highly differentiated in item-level performance on an explicit mentalizing task tapping ability to read complex emotion and mental states from the eye region of the face (Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test; RMET)...
October 18, 2016: Scientific Reports
Michaël R Laurent, Geoffrey L Hammond, Marco Blokland, Ferran Jardí, Leen Antonio, Vanessa Dubois, Rougin Khalil, Saskia S Sterk, Evelien Gielen, Brigitte Decallonne, Geert Carmeliet, Jean-Marc Kaufman, Tom Fiers, Ilpo T Huhtaniemi, Dirk Vanderschueren, Frank Claessens
Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is the high-affinity binding protein for androgens and estrogens. According to the free hormone hypothesis, SHBG modulates the bioactivity of sex steroids by limiting their diffusion into target tissues. Still, the in vivo physiological role of circulating SHBG remains unclear, especially since mice and rats lack circulating SHBG post-natally. To test the free hormone hypothesis in vivo, we examined total and free sex steroid concentrations and bioactivity on target organs in mice expressing a human SHBG transgene...
October 17, 2016: Scientific Reports
Sairam Parthasarathy, Mary A Carskadon, Girardin Jean-Louis, Judith Owens, Adam Bramoweth, Daniel Combs, Lauren Hale, Elizabeth Harrison, Chantelle N Hart, Brant P Hasler, Sarah M Honaker, Elisabeth Hertenstein, Samuel Kuna, Clete Kushida, Jessica C Levenson, Caitlin Murray, Allan I Pack, Vivek Pillai, Kristi Pruiksma, Azizi Seixas, Patrick Strollo, Saurabh S Thosar, Natasha Williams, Daniel Buysse
A wealth of scientific knowledge is being generated in sleep and circadian science. In order for us to realize the return on investment for such scientific knowledge and to improve the health of the nation, we need to disseminate and implement research findings into practice. An implementation gap - termed a "quality chasm" by the Institutes of Medicine - separates the scientific knowledge we possess and the implementation of such knowledge into preventative interventions or healthcare treatments. It is frequently reported that a time lag of 17 years transpires before medical research reaches clinical practice...
October 10, 2016: Sleep
Stefan Stefanovic, Markus Wallwiener, Uros Karic, Christoph Domschke, Luka Katic, Florin-Andrei Taran, Aleksandra Pesic, Andreas Hartkopf, Peyman Hadji, Martin Teufel, Florian Schuetz, Christof Sohn, Peter Fasching, Andreas Schneeweiss, Sara Brucker
PURPOSE: The capture of adequate treatment outcomes and quality of life (QOL) of advanced breast cancer patients in clinical routine represents a great challenge. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are data elements directly reported by patients about experiences with care, including symptoms, functional status, or quality of life. There is growing interest in the medical community for the evaluation and implementation of PROs of adverse events (PRO-AEs). Recent interest in PROs in health care has evolved in the context of patient centeredness...
October 17, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Zhongheng Zhang, Nathan J Smischney, Haibo Zhang, Sven Van Poucke, Panagiotis Tsirigotis, Jordi Rello, Patrick M Honore, Win Sen Kuan, Juliet June Ray, Jiancang Zhou, You Shang, Yuetian Yu, Christian Jung, Chiara Robba, Fabio Silvio Taccone, Pietro Caironi, David Grimaldi, Stefan Hofer, George Dimopoulos, Marc Leone, Sang-Bum Hong, Mabrouk Bahloul, Laurent Argaud, Won Young Kim, Herbert D Spapen, Jose Rodolfo Rocco
Sepsis is a heterogeneous disease caused by an infection stimulus that triggers several complex local and systemic immuno-inflammatory reactions, which results in multiple organ dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of sepsis is challenging because there is no gold standard for diagnosis. As a result, the clinical diagnosis of sepsis is ever changing to meet the clinical and research requirements. Moreover, although there are many novel biomarkers and screening tools for predicting the risk of sepsis, the diagnostic performance and effectiveness of these measures are less than satisfactory, and there is insufficient evidence to recommend clinical use of these new techniques...
September 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
Jong-Hwa Ahn, Jeong Yoon Jang, Young-Hoon Jeong
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of Thoracic Disease
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