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"Contraceptive method" and failure

Brandon K Bellows, Casey R Tak, Jessica N Sanders, David K Turok, Eleanor B Schwarz
BACKGROUND: The copper intrauterine device is the most effective form of emergency contraception and can also provide long-term contraception. The levonorgestrel intrauterine device has also been studied in combination with oral levonorgestrel for women seeking emergency contraception. However, intrauterine devices have higher upfront costs than oral methods, such as ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel. Healthcare payers and decision makers (e.g., healthcare insurers, government programs) with financial constraints must determine if the increased effectiveness of intrauterine device emergency contraception methods are worth the additional costs...
January 31, 2018: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Yassaman Vafai, Julia R Steinberg
OBJECTIVE: We examined whether pre-abortion depressive symptoms were associated with contraceptive method effectiveness level chosen among women seeking abortions. STUDY DESIGN: Three-hundred and forty-seven young, low income women 18years or older who were seeking abortions at 3 community reproductive health clinics in Northern California were recruited to participated in a study on contraceptive decision-making. We classified women into choosing low, moderate, or high effectiveness contraceptive methods based on typical use failure rates...
December 26, 2017: Contraception
Maria Isabel Rodriguez, Mary E Gaffield, Leo Han, Aaron B Caughey
OBJECTIVE: The association between increased risk of HIV acquisition and use of progestin-only injectables (POIs) is controversial. We sought to compare the competing risks of maternal mortality and HIV acquisition with use of POIs using updated data on this association and considering an expanded number of African countries. METHODS: We designed a decision-analytic model to compare the benefits and risks of POIs on the competing risks of maternal mortality and HIV acquisition on life expectancy for women in 9 African countries...
December 28, 2017: Global Health, Science and Practice
Elisabeth Eckersberger, Erin Pearson, Kathryn Andersen, Altaf Hossain, Katharine Footman, Kamal Kanti Biswas, Sadid Nuremowla, Kate Reiss
BACKGROUND: Abortions are restricted in Bangladesh, but menstrual regulation is an approved alternative, defined as a procedure of regulating the menstrual cycle when menstruation is absent for a short duration. Use of contraception after menstrual regulation can reduce subsequent unintended pregnancy, but in Bangladesh, the contraceptive method mix is dominated by short-term methods, which have higher discontinuation and failure rates. Mobile phones are a channel via which menstrual regulation clients could be offered contraceptive support after leaving the clinic...
December 14, 2017: JMIR MHealth and UHealth
Blair Dina, Leah J Peipert, Qiuhong Zhao, Jeffrey F Peipert
BACKGROUND: Intrauterine devices have been gaining popularity for the past 2 decades. Current data report that >10% of women who use contraception are using an intrauterine device. With <1% failure rates, the intrauterine device is one of the most effective forms of long-acting reversible contraception, yet evidence shows that fear of pain during intrauterine device placement deters women from choosing an intrauterine device as their contraceptive method. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this analysis was to estimate the association between anticipated pain with intrauterine device placement and experienced pain...
February 2018: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Kirsten I Black, Safeera Y Hussainy
BACKGROUND: Emergency contraception can be used to prevent pregnancy where contraception has not been used, or there has been contraceptive misuse or failure. Australian women have three options for emergency contraception: two types of oral pills (levonorgestrel [LNG]-containing pill and ulipristal acetate [UPA]) and the copper intrauterine device (IUD). Both pills are available from pharmacies without prescription, whereas the copper IUD requires insertion by a trained provider. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to describe the indications, efficacy and contraindications for use of the three emergency contraceptive methods available in Australia...
October 2017: Australian Family Physician
Nityanjali Thummalachetty, Sanyukta Mathur, Margo Mullinax, Kelsea DeCosta, Neema Nakyanjo, Tom Lutalo, Heena Brahmbhatt, John S Santelli
BACKGROUND: Low contraceptive uptake and high unmet need for contraception remain significant issues in Uganda compared to neighboring countries such as Kenya, Ethiopia, and Rwanda. Although prior research on contraceptive uptake has indicated that male partners strongly influence women's decisions around contraceptive use, there is limited in-depth qualitative research on knowledge and concerns regarding modern contraceptive methods among Ugandan men. METHODS: Using in-depth interviews (N = 41), this qualitative study investigated major sources of knowledge about contraception and perceptions of contraceptive side effects among married Ugandan men...
October 10, 2017: BMC Public Health
E Berglund Scherwitzl, O Lundberg, H Kopp Kallner, K Gemzell Danielsson, J Trussell, R Scherwitzl
OBJECTIVES: The Natural Cycles application is a fertility awareness-based contraceptive method that uses dates of menstruation and basal body temperature to inform couples whether protected intercourse is needed to prevent pregnancies. Our purpose with this study is to investigate the contraceptive efficacy of the mobile application by evaluating the perfect- and typical-use Pearl Index. STUDY DESIGN: In this prospective observational study, 22,785 users of the application logged a total of 18,548 woman-years of data into the application...
December 2017: Contraception
Wing Kay Fok, Paul D Blumenthal
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Contraception is a vital component of medical care for women with HIV or at high risk of acquiring HIV. Over the last several years, there has been emerging evidence regarding the safety and effectiveness of various contraceptive methods, ultimately leading to a revision in the WHO Medical Eligibility Criteria for contraceptive use. RECENT FINDINGS: Progestogen-only injectables may be associated with an increased risk of HIV acquisition and its use has been revised to category 2 from category 1...
December 2017: Current Opinion in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Michelle Solomon, Gia M Badolato, Lauren S Chernick, Maria E Trent, James M Chamberlain, Monika K Goyal
OBJECTIVES: To determine pregnancy risk and receptiveness to emergency department (ED)-based pregnancy prevention interventions among adolescents accessing care in the ED. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional electronic survey of adolescent females in a pediatric ED used to calculate the Pregnancy Risk Index, a validated measure estimating the annual risk of becoming pregnant based on recent sexual activity, contraceptive method(s), method-specific contraceptive failure rates, and interest in receipt of ED-based contraceptive services...
October 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
S T Cameron, Hwr Li, K Gemzell-Danielsson
Emergency contraception (EC) is a method to be used in the case of unprotected sexual intercourse, failure of a regular contraceptive method, or after rape to try to prevent an unintended pregnancy. Oral EC remains surrounded by controversy, much due to myths and misconceptions among the public, policy makers and healthcare providers. This has resulted in restrictions on its availability in many parts of the world and restrictions on women's access to it. The aim of this article is to provide an evidence-based view on some of these common controversial issues surrounding oral EC in clinical practice...
June 28, 2017: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
(no author information available yet)
Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine barriers to the use of emergency contraception, emphasize the importance of increasing access, and review new methods of emergency contraception and limitations in efficacy in special populations...
July 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology
(no author information available yet)
Emergency contraception refers to contraceptive methods used to prevent pregnancy in the first few days after unprotected intercourse, sexual assault, or contraceptive failure. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first dedicated product for emergency contraception in 1998, numerous barriers to emergency contraception remain. The purpose of this Committee Opinion is to examine barriers to the use of emergency contraception, emphasize the importance of increasing access, and review new methods of emergency contraception and limitations in efficacy in special populations...
July 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Fauzia Akhter Huda, Yolande Robertson, Sabiha Chowdhuri, Bidhan Krishna Sarker, Laura Reichenbach, Ratana Somrongthong
BACKGROUND: Bangladesh has experienced a sevenfold increase in its contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) in less than forty years from 8% in 1975 to 62% in 2014. However, despite this progress, almost one-third of pregnancies are still unintended which may be attributed to unmet need for family planning and discontinuation and switching of methods after initiation of their use. METHODS: We conducted an extensive literature review on contraceptive use among married women of reproductive age (MWRA) in Bangladesh...
June 6, 2017: Reproductive Health
Jen Sothornwit, Yuthapong Werawatakul, Srinaree Kaewrudee, Pisake Lumbiganon, Malinee Laopaiboon
BACKGROUND: The spacing of pregnancies has a positive impact on maternal and newborn health. The progestin contraceptive implant, which is a long-acting, reversible method of contraception, has a well-established low failure rate that is compatible with tubal sterilization. The standard provision of contraceptive methods on the first postpartum visit may put some women at risk of unintended pregnancy, either due to loss to follow-up or having sexual intercourse prior to receiving contraception...
April 22, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Magalie Ladouceur, Florence Pontnau, Laurence Iserin
The population of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) is continuously increasing with now a higher prevalence than that of the pediatric population. This concerns above all complex congenital heart diseases. Heart failure is the primary cause of death followed by arrhythmia, which is very common in ACHD. A specialized follow-up by dedicated centers is significantly associated with an improvement of survival of ACHD patients compared to non-expert follow-up. Extracardiac disorders (liver, kidney, respiratory) are frequent and require an accurate and specific management...
May 2017: La Presse Médicale
Ellen S Rome, Veronica Issac
Unplanned or unintended pregnancy remains a significant challenge for adolescents; many teens who plan ahead but opt not to choose long-acting reversible contraceptive methods have high failure rates with condom usage, oral contraceptives, and other less long-acting methods. Emergency contraception (EC) remains a necessity for those adolescents seeking a second chance to prevent the unintended consequences of unplanned sexual activity. At present, 5 postcoital methods remain available as EC globally: intrauterine devices, ulipristal acetate, a selective progesterone modulator, mifepristone; levonorgestrel, and ethinyl estradiol plus levonorgestrel or norgestrel (rarely used now that progestin only methods are more readily available)...
April 2017: Pediatric Clinics of North America
Jennifer C Aengst, Elizabeth K Harrington, Pramod Bahulekar, Poonam Shivkumar, Jeffrey T Jensen, B S Garg
BACKGROUND: New permanent contraceptive methods are in development, including nonsurgical permanent contraception (NSPC). OBJECTIVE: In the present study, perceptions of NSPC in India among married women, married men, mothers-in-law, providers, and health advocates in Eastern Maharashtra (Wardha district) and New Delhi were examined. METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 married women and 20 mothers-in-law; surveys with 150 married men; and focus group discussions with obstetrics/gynecology providers and advocates...
January 2017: Indian Journal of Public Health
Aqeela Tabassum, Yasir Nawaz Manj, Tahira Rehman Gunjial, Salma Nazir
OBJECTIVE: To identify the perceptions of rural women about modern contraceptive methods and to ascertain the psycho-social and economic attitude of women about family planning methods. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan, from December 2014 to March 2015, and comprised married women. The sample was selected using multistage sampling technique through Fitzgibbon table. They were interviewed regarding use of family planning methods...
December 2016: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Rebecca G Simmons, Dominick C Shattuck, Victoria H Jennings
BACKGROUND: Some 222 million women worldwide have unmet needs for contraception; they want to avoid pregnancy, but are not using a contraceptive method, primarily because of concerns about side effects associated with most available methods. Expanding contraceptive options-particularly fertility awareness options that provide women with information about which days during their menstrual cycles they are likely to become pregnant if they have unprotected intercourse-has the potential to reduce unmet need...
January 18, 2017: JMIR Research Protocols
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