Read by QxMD icon Read

seizure tbi

Nickalus R Khan, Matthew A VanLandingham, Tamara M Fierst, Caroline Hymel, Kathryn Hoes, Linton T Evans, Rory Mayer, Fred Barker, Paul Klimo
BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic seizure (PTS) is a significant complication of traumatic brain injury (TBI). OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare levetiracetam with phenytoin for seizure prophylaxis in patients diagnosed with severe TBI. METHODS: An inclusive search of several electronic databases and bibliographies was conducted to identify scientific studies that compared the effect of levetiracetam and phenytoin on PTS...
September 30, 2016: Neurosurgery
Anne C Ritter, Amy K Wagner, Anthony Fabio, Mary Jo Pugh, William C Walker, Jerzy P Szaflarski, Ross D Zafonte, Allen W Brown, Flora M Hammond, Tamara Bushnik, Douglas Johnson-Greene, Timothy Shea, Jason W Krellman, Joseph A Rosenthal, Laura E Dreer
OBJECTIVE: Determine incidence of posttraumatic seizure (PTS) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) among individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI requiring rehabilitation and surviving at least 5 years. METHODS: Using the prospective TBI Model Systems National Database, we calculated PTS incidence during acute hospitalization, and at years 1, 2, and 5 postinjury in a continuously followed cohort enrolled from 1989 to 2000 (n = 795). Incidence rates were stratified by risk factors, and adjusted relative risk (RR) was calculated...
October 14, 2016: Epilepsia
Ranabir Pal, Ashok Munivenkatappa, Amit Agrawal, Geetha R Menon, Sagar Galwankar, P Rama Mohan, S Satish Kumar, B V Subrahmanyam
BACKGROUND: A reliable prediction of outcome for the victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on admission is possible from concurrent data analysis from any systematic real-time registry. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical relevance of the findings from our TBI registry to develop prognostic futuristic models with readily available traditional and novel predictors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospectively collected data using predesigned pro forma were analyzed from the first phase of a trauma registry from a South Indian Trauma Centre, compatible with computerized management system at electronic data entry and web data entry interface on demographics, clinical, management, and discharge status...
July 2016: International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science
Pedro Andrade, Jari Nissinen, Asla Pitkanen
Sleep disturbances commonly occur after traumatic brain injury and may predispose patients to epileptic seizures. We hypothesized that unprovoked seizure occurrence after traumatic brain injury depends on the sleep-wake cycle, and that the electrographic characteristics of a given sleep stage provide biomarkers for post-traumatic epilepsy. We show in a rat lateral fluid-percussion model that 92% of spontaneous generalized seizures occur during the transition from stage III to rapid-eye-movement sleep. Moreover, a reduction in spindle duration and dominant frequency during the transition stage present as specific and sensitive non-invasive biomarkers for experimentally induced post-traumatic epilepsy with generalized electrographic seizures...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Shannon Inglet, Margaret Baldwin, Amie H Quinones, Sarah Majercik, Dave S Collingridge, Joel MacDonald
The use of prophylactic anticonvulsants to prevent early post-traumatic seizures (PTSs) is recommended but inconsistently employed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The authors evaluated outcomes associated with prophylaxis administration in patients with TBI at a Level 1 trauma center. All patients admitted with TBI from October 2007 through May 2012 were included. Our primary outcome was the incidence of early PTSs. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) stays, and incidence of late seizures...
August 26, 2016: Curēus
Emilio Russo, Rita Citraro, Andrew Constanti, Antonio Leo, Annika Lüttjohann, Gilles van Luijtelaar, Giovambattista De Sarro
The WAG/Rij rat model has recently gathered attention as a suitable animal model of absence epileptogenesis. This latter term has a broad definition encompassing any possible cause that determines the development of spontaneous seizures; however, most of, if not all, preclinical knowledge on epileptogenesis is confined to the study of post-brain insult models such as traumatic brain injury or post-status epilepticus models. WAG/Rij rats, but also synapsin 2 knockout, Kv7 current-deficient mice represent the first examples of genetic models where an efficacious antiepileptogenic treatment (ethosuximide) was started before seizure onset...
September 26, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Alan H Weintraub, Donald J Gerber, Robert G Kowalski
OBJECTIVE: To describe incidence, clinical characteristics, complications, and outcomes in post-traumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) following traumatic brain injury (TBI) for patients treated in an inpatient rehabilitation program. DESIGN: Cohort study with retrospective comparative analysis SETTING: Inpatient rehabilitation hospital PARTICIPANTS: All patients admitted for TBI from 2009 to 2013 diagnosed with PTH, defined as ventriculomegaly, delayed clinical recovery discordant with injury severity, hydrocephalus symptoms, or positive lumbar puncture results...
September 23, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Lara L Zimmermann, Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, Paul M Vespa
Posttraumatic seizures are a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Posttraumatic epilepsy accounts for 20% of symptomatic epilepsy in the general population and 5% of all epilepsy. Early posttraumatic seizures occur in more than 20% of patients in the intensive care unit and are associated with secondary brain injury and worse patient outcomes. Most posttraumatic seizures are nonconvulsive and therefore continuous electroencephalography monitoring should be the standard of care for patients with moderate or severe brain injury...
October 2016: Neurosurgery Clinics of North America
Alexander V Glushakov, Olena Y Glushakova, Sylvain Doré, Paul R Carney, Ronald L Hayes
Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one of the most common and devastating complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Currently, the etiopathology and mechanisms of PTE are poorly understood and as a result, there is no effective treatment or means to prevent it. Antiepileptic drugs remain common preventive strategies in the management of TBI to control acute posttraumatic seizures and to prevent the development of PTE, although their efficacy in the latter case is disputed. Different strategies of PTE prophylaxis have been showing promise in preclinical models, but their translation to the clinic still remains elusive due in part to the variability of these models and the fact they do not recapitulate all complex pathologies associated with human TBI...
2016: Methods in Molecular Biology
Fushun Wang, Xiaowei Wang, Lee A Shapiro, Maria L Cotrina, Weimin Liu, Ernest W Wang, Simeng Gu, Wei Wang, Xiaosheng He, Maiken Nedergaard, Jason H Huang
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not only a leading cause for morbidity and mortality in young adults (Bruns and Hauser, Epilepsia 44(Suppl 10):210, 2003), but also a leading cause of seizures. Understanding the seizure-inducing mechanisms of TBI is of the utmost importance, because these seizures are often resistant to traditional first- and second-line anti-seizure treatments. The early post-traumatic seizures, in turn, are a contributing factor to ongoing neuropathology, and it is critically important to control these seizures...
September 1, 2016: Brain Structure & Function
Adán Pérez-Arredondo, Eduardo Cázares-Ramírez, Paul Carrillo-Mora, Marina Martínez-Vargas, Noemí Cárdenas-Rodríguez, Elvia Coballase-Urrutia, Radamés Alemón-Medina, Aristides Sampieri, Luz Navarro, Liliana Carmona-Aparicio
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an alteration in brain function, caused by an external force, which may be a hit on the skull, rapid acceleration or deceleration, penetration of an object, or shock waves from an explosion. Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a high prevalence rate in pediatric patients, in which treatment options are still limited, not available at present neuroprotective drugs. Although the therapeutic management of these patients is varied and dependent on the severity of the injury, general techniques of drug types are handled, as well as physical and surgical...
August 25, 2016: Clinical Neuropharmacology
Vin Shen Ban, James A Botros, Christopher J Madden, H Hunt Batjer
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Athletic neurosurgical emergencies are injuries that can lead to mortality or significant morbidity and require immediate recognition and treatment. This review article discusses the epidemiology of sports-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) with an attempt to quantify the incidence of neurosurgical emergencies in sports. Emergencies such as intracranial hemorrhage, second impact syndrome, vascular injuries, and seizures are discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: The incidence of sports-related TBI presenting to level I or II trauma centers in the USA is about 10 in 100,000 population per year...
September 2016: Current Pain and Headache Reports
Sebastian A Lewandowski, Linda Fredriksson, Daniel A Lawrence, Ulf Eriksson
: Neurological disorders account for a majority of non-malignant disability in humans and are often associated with dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recent evidence shows that despite apparent variation in the origin of neural damage, the central nervous system has a common injury response mechanism involving platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-CC activation in the neurovascular unit and subsequent dysfunction of BBB integrity. Inhibition of PDGF-CC signaling with imatinib in mice has been shown to prevent BBB dysfunction and have neuroprotective effects in acute damage conditions, including traumatic brain injury, seizures or stroke, as well as in neurodegenerative diseases that develop over time, including multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis...
August 12, 2016: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Jarin Vaewpanich, Karin Reuter-Rice
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality. Secondary injury that occurs as a result of a direct impact plays a crucial role in patient prognosis. The guidelines for the management of severe TBI target treatment of secondary injury. Posttraumatic seizure, one of the secondary injury sequelae, contributes to further damage to the injured brain. Continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) helps detect both clinical and subclinical seizure, which aids early detection and prompt treatment...
September 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Aylin Y Reid, Anatol Bragin, Christopher C Giza, Richard J Staba, Jerome Engel
OBJECTIVE: Posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE) accounts for 20% of acquired epilepsies. Experimental models are important for studying epileptogenesis. We previously reported that repetitive high-frequency oscillations with spikes (rHFOSs) occur early after lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) and may be a biomarker for PTE. The objective of this study was to use multiple electrodes in rat hippocampal and neocortical regions to describe the long-term electroencephalographic and behavioral evolution of rHFOSs and epileptic seizures after traumatic brain injury (TBI)...
October 2016: Epilepsia
Arash Abdolmaleki, Ali Moghimi, Mohammad B Ghayour, Morteza B Rassouli
Citicoline (cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine) is a neuroprotective agent that is administered following ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. There is little information about the antiseizure and anxiolytic effects of citicoline, which are therefore addressed in the present study. For evaluating the anticonvulsant effect of citicoline in the pentylentetrazole seizure model, a single intraperitoneal dose of citicoline was administered at 50, 100 or 150mg/kg. Sedative and anxiolytic effects of citicoline were examined via elevated plus maze and pentobarbital induced sleep tests...
October 15, 2016: European Journal of Pharmacology
Lauren M Nentwich, Benjamin Grimmnitz
Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections...
August 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Kadhaya David Muballe, Timothy Hardcastle, Erastus Kiratu
OBJECTIVES Penetrating traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be divided into gunshot wounds or stab wounds based on the mechanisms of injury. Pediatric penetrating TBIs are of major concern as many parental and social factors may be involved in the causation. The authors describe the penetrating cranial injuries in pediatric patient subgroups at risk and presenting to the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, by assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and review of the common neurological manifestations including cranial nerve abnormalities...
July 29, 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
Helen E Scharfman
Mossy cells comprise a large fraction of the cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, suggesting that their function in this region is important. They are vulnerable to ischaemia, traumatic brain injury and seizures, and their loss could contribute to dentate gyrus dysfunction in such conditions. Mossy cell function has been unclear because these cells innervate both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons within the dentate gyrus, contributing to a complex circuitry. It has also been difficult to directly and selectively manipulate mossy cells to study their function...
September 2016: Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
Karolien Goffin, Koen van Laere
Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a functional nuclear imaging technique that allows visualization and quantification of different in vivo physiologic and pathologic features of brain neurobiology. It has been used for many years in diagnosis of several neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In this chapter, we discuss the current state-of-the-art of SPECT imaging of brain perfusion and dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging. Brain perfusion SPECT imaging plays an important role in the localization of the seizure onset zone in patients with refractory epilepsy...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"