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Cultural humility

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28727961/psychology-s-replication-crisis-and-the-grant-culture-righting-the-ship
#1
Scott O Lilienfeld
The past several years have been a time for soul searching in psychology, as we have gradually come to grips with the reality that some of our cherished findings are less robust than we had assumed. Nevertheless, the replication crisis highlights the operation of psychological science at its best, as it reflects our growing humility. At the same time, institutional variables, especially the growing emphasis on external funding as an expectation or de facto requirement for faculty tenure and promotion, pose largely unappreciated hazards for psychological science, including (a) incentives for engaging in questionable research practices, (b) a single-minded focus on programmatic research, (c) intellectual hyperspecialization, (d) disincentives for conducting direct replications, (e) stifling of creativity and intellectual risk taking, (f) researchers promising more than they can deliver, and (g) diminished time for thinking deeply...
July 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28700776/the-linear-nail-streak-a-lesson-in-cultural-humility
#2
Neil S Prose
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 12, 2017: JAMA Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28633732/to-err-is-human-can-american-medicine-learn-from-past-mistakes
#3
Jeffrey B Ritterman
The history of medicine includes many errors. Some persisted for decades and caused great harm. Several are highlighted in this article, including the mythical thymic diseases: thymic asthma and status thymicolymphaticus. Some medical mistakes, such as the diet-heart hypothesis of Ancel Keys, continue to cause harm. To avoid future errors and their associated harm, I suggest a cultural shift encouraging professional humility and greater questioning of medical dogma. Medical education focused on teaching students this history may help with this cultural shift...
2017: Permanente Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28632597/leadership-communication-and-negotiation-across-a-diverse-workforce-an-aoa-critical-issues-symposium
#4
Denis R Clohisy, Michael J Yaszemski, Joanne Lipman
The current workforce in the United States is rapidly changing and is increasingly inclusive of individuals from a broad range of ages, ethnicities, and cultural backgrounds. Engaging and leading a diverse workforce creates great opportunities for innovation and adaptation in our evolving medical economic and clinical care delivery environment. For optimal engagement of employees and partners, orthopaedic surgeons must develop the necessary skills for executing change inside complex organizations and across teams composed of a variety of providers and skilled workers...
June 21, 2017: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28628586/building-a-pediatric-oral-health-training-curriculum-for-community-health-workers
#5
Molly Martin, William Frese, Christie Lumsden, Anna Sandoval
OBJECTIVES: Community health workers (CHWs) are a promising approach to oral health promotion in high-risk populations. This article describes the process of creating a pediatric oral health CHW training curriculum. DESIGN: Existing curricula were identified through outreach efforts to experts in the oral health and CHW fields, as well as PubMed and Google searches. After coding basic information, curricula were mapped to define oral health domains. Then group discussion was employed to determine final curriculum contents...
June 16, 2017: Journal of Public Health Management and Practice: JPHMP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28616899/improving-socially-constructed-cross-cultural-communication-in-aged-care-homes-a-critical-perspective
#6
Lily Dongxia Xiao, Eileen Willis, Ann Harrington, David Gillham, Anita De Bellis, Wendy Morey, Lesley Jeffers
Cultural diversity between residents and staff is significant in aged care homes in many developed nations in the context of international migration. This diversity can be a challenge to achieving effective cross-cultural communication. The aim of this study was to critically examine how staff and residents initiated effective cross-cultural communication and social cohesion that enabled positive changes to occur. A critical hermeneutic analysis underpinned by Giddens' Structuration Theory was applied to the study...
June 14, 2017: Nursing Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594200/a-mixed-methods-study-of-personality-conceptions-in-the-levant-jordan-lebanon-syria-and-the-west-bank
#7
Pia Zeinoun, Lina Daouk-Öyry, Lina Choueiri, Fons J R van de Vijver
Personality taxonomies are investigated using either etic-style studies that test whether Western-developed models fit in a new culture, or emic-style studies that derive personality dimensions from a local culture, using a psycholexical approach. Recent studies have incorporated strengths from both approaches. We combine the 2 approaches in the first study of personality descriptors in spoken Arabic. In Study 1, we collected 17,283 responses from a sample of adults in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and the West Bank (N = 545)...
June 8, 2017: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441674/the-development-of-an-indigenous-health-curriculum-for-medical-students
#8
Melissa Lewis, Amy Prunuske
Indigenous populations experience dramatic health disparities; yet, few medical schools equip students with the skills to address these inequities. At the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth campus, a project to develop an Indigenous health curriculum began in September 2013. This project used collaborative and decolonizing methods to gather ideas and opinions from multiple stakeholders, including students, community members, faculty, and administration, to guide the process of adding Indigenous health content to the curriculum to prepare students to work effectively with Indigenous populations...
May 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353189/reflections-on-ethics-and-humanity-in-pediatric-neurology-the-value-of-recognizing-ethical-issues-in-common-clinical-practice
#9
REVIEW
Gabriel M Ronen, Peter L Rosenbaum
Our goals in this reflection are to (i) identify the ethical dimensions inherent in any clinical encounter and (ii) bring to the forefront of our pediatric neurology practice the myriad of opportunities to explore and learn from these ethical questions. We highlight specifically Beauchamp and Childress's principles of biomedical ethics. We use the terms ethics in common clinical practice and an ethical lens to remind people of the ubiquity of ethical situations and the usefulness of using existing ethical principles to analyze and resolve difficult situations in clinical practice...
May 2017: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28347520/-some-of-them-shut-the-door-with-a-single-word-but-she-was-different-a-migrant-patient-s-culture-a-physician-s-narrative-humility-and-a-researcher-s-bias
#10
Kristina Würth, Sylvie Schuster
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 24, 2017: Patient Education and Counseling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28346113/wisdom-in-context
#11
Igor Grossmann
Philosophers and psychological scientists have converged on the idea that wisdom involves certain aspects of thinking (e.g., intellectual humility, recognition of uncertainty and change), enabling application of knowledge to life challenges. Empirical evidence indicates that people's ability to think wisely varies dramatically across experiential contexts that they encounter over the life span. Moreover, wise thinking varies from one situation to another, with self-focused contexts inhibiting wise thinking...
March 2017: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187021/on-the-road-to-professionalism
#12
REVIEW
David H Chestnut
Many observers have concluded that we have a crisis of professionalism in the practice of medicine. In this essay, the author identifies and discusses personal attributes and commitments important in the development and maintenance of physician professionalism: humility, servant leadership, self-awareness, kindness, altruism, attention to personal well-being, responsibility and concern for patient safety, lifelong learning, self-regulation, and honesty and integrity. Professionalism requires character, but character alone is not enough...
May 2017: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28143568/factors-predicting-training-transfer-in-health-professionals-participating-in-quality-improvement-educational-interventions
#13
Ahmed Eid, Doris Quinn
BACKGROUND: Predictors of quality improvement (QI) training transfer are needed. This study aimed to identify these predictors among health professionals who participated in a QI training program held at a large hospital in the United States between 2005 and 2014. It also aimed to determine how these predictive factors facilitated or impeded QI training transfer. METHODS: Following the Success Case Method, we used a screening survey to identify trainees with high and low levels of training transfer...
January 31, 2017: BMC Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28062825/global-family-medicine-a-universal-mnemonic
#14
William B Ventres
In this essay, I borrow the idea of universal precautions from infection control and suggest that family physicians use a set of considerations, based on the mnemonic UNIVERSAL, to nurture cultural humility, enter a metaphoric "space-in-between" in cross-cultural encounters, and foster global fluency. These UNIVERSAL considerations I base on my experiences in global family medicine, attending to economically poor and socially marginalized patients in both international and domestic settings. They are informed by readings in transcultural psychiatry, medical anthropology, development studies, and primary care...
January 2017: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28027035/justice-and-u-s-occupational-therapy-practice-a-relationship-100-years-in-the-making
#15
Rebecca M Aldrich, Tessa L Boston, Claire E Daaleman
At 99 years old, occupational therapy is a global health care profession with a growing orientation toward justice. Because much of the occupational justice discourse has developed outside the United States, parallels between the profession's ethos and its current focus on justice must be examined more closely in this country. Although occupational therapy practitioners in the United States are better equipped than their predecessors with language and theories that explicitly emphasize justice, the potential for bringing that focus to bear depends on practitioners' willingness to think differently about their practices...
January 2017: American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27876106/hubris-and-humility-effect-and-the-domain-masculine-intelligence-type-in-two-countries-colombia-and-the-uk
#16
Josephine Storek, Adrian Furnham
Spanish-speaking Colombian (n = 50) and English-speaking British (N = 52) adults completed a self-assessed intelligence measure that yielded a score on domain-masculine intelligence (DMIQ), a composite of mathematical/logical and spatial intelligences. They also completed a Sex Role inventory in order to establish their masculinity and femininity. Males in both countries gave significantly higher self-estimates (Colombia: Males 110.36, Females 100.75, d = .94; England: Males 114.37, Females 105.75, d = .86; both p < ...
November 23, 2016: Spanish Journal of Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818848/an-examination-of-cultural-competence-training-in-us-medical-education-guided-by-the-tool-for-assessing-cultural-competence-training
#17
Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan, Jordan B Hearod, Kim Tran, Keith C Norris, Dedra Buchwald
In the United States, medical students must demonstrate a standard level of "cultural competence," upon graduation. Cultural competence is most often defined as a set of congruent behaviors, attitudes, and policies that come together in a system, organization, or among professionals that enables effective work in cross-cultural situations. The Association of American Medical Colleges developed the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training (TACCT) to assist schools in developing and evaluating cultural competence curricula to meet these requirements...
2016: Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27812847/needs-priorities-and-recommendations-for-engaging-underrepresented-populations-in-clinical-research-a-community-perspective
#18
Jennifer Cunningham Erves, Tilicia L Mayo-Gamble, Alecia Malin-Fair, Alaina Boyer, Yvonne Joosten, Yolanda C Vaughn, Lisa Sherden, Patrick Luther, Stephania Miller, Consuelo H Wilkins
Engaging underrepresented groups in outcomes research is a public health priority for reducing health and health care disparities; yet, engaging these groups is challenging. Failure to involve these underrepresented populations in research further exacerbates these disparities. This article presents the health and research priorities of diverse groups of underrepresented populations in biomedical research, their concerns for participating in research, and strategies to engage them in their healthcare and research studies...
June 2017: Journal of Community Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27752981/cultural-humility-and-hospital-safety-culture
#19
Joshua N Hook, David Boan, Don E Davis, Jamie D Aten, John M Ruiz, Thomas Maryon
Hospital safety culture is an integral part of providing high quality care for patients, as well as promoting a safe and healthy environment for healthcare workers. In this article, we explore the extent to which cultural humility, which involves openness to cultural diverse individuals and groups, is related to hospital safety culture. A sample of 2011 hospital employees from four hospitals completed measures of organizational cultural humility and hospital safety culture. Higher perceptions of organizational cultural humility were associated with higher levels of general perceptions of hospital safety, as well as more positive ratings on non-punitive response to error (i...
December 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27691784/personal-value-preferences-group-identifications-and-cultural-practices-of-palestinian-israelis-working-in-close-contact-with-jewish-israelis
#20
Eugene Tartakovsky, Ayat Abu Kheit
The present study investigates the connection between personal value preferences, group identifications, and cultural practices among Palestinian Israelis working in close contact with the Jewish population in Israel. One hundred twenty-two Palestinian Israelis participated in the study. The participants were employed in different professional positions in the Tel Aviv Metropolitan area and were recruited to the study using the snowball technique. A stronger national identification was associated with a higher preference for the security and conformity values, and a lower preference for the humility values...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Social Psychology
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