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nutrition metabolism

Luba Sominsky, Christine L Jasoni, Hannah Twigg, Sarah J Spencer
The hypothalamus is a key centre for regulation of vital physiological functions, such as appetite, stress responsiveness and reproduction. Development of the different hypothalamic nuclei and its major neuronal populations begins prenatally in both altricial and precocial species, with the fine tuning of neuronal connectivity and attainment of adult function established postnatally, and maintained throughout adult life. The perinatal period is highly susceptible to environmental insults that, by disrupting critical developmental processes, can set the tone for the establishment of adult functionality...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Endocrinology
Elizabeth W Uhl
Although vitamin D is critical to calcium/phosphorus homeostasis, bone formation and remodeling, there is evolution-based variation between species in vitamin D metabolism and susceptibility to rickets and osteomalacia. Most herbivores produce vitamin D3 in response to sunlight, but dogs and cats have generally lost the ability as carnivore diets are rich in vitamin D. Nutritional deficiencies and/or poor exposure to sunlight can induce rickets in birds, swine, cattle and sheep, but horses are less susceptible as they have evolved a calcium homeostasis that is quite different than other animals...
March 13, 2018: International Journal of Paleopathology
Muraly Puttabyatappa, Vasantha Padmanabhan
The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the origin of several ovarian pathologies remain unclear. In addition to the genetic basis, developmental insults are gaining attention as a basis for the origin of these pathologies. Such early insults include maternal over or under nutrition, stress, and exposure to environmental chemicals. This chapter reviews the development and physiological function of the ovary, the known ovarian pathologies, the developmental check points of ovarian differentiation impacted by developmental insults, the role played by steroidal and metabolic factors as mediaries, the epigenetic mechanisms via which these mediaries induce their effects, and the knowledge gaps for targeting future studies to ultimately aid in the development of improved treatments...
2018: Vitamins and Hormones
Samia Hadj Ahmed, Wafa Kharroubi, Nadia Kaoubaa, Amira Zarrouk, Fathi Batbout, Habib Gamra, Mohamed Fadhel Najjar, Gérard Lizard, Isabelle Hininger-Favier, Mohamed Hammami
BACKGROUND: Nutritional choices, which include the source of dietary fatty acids (FA), have an important significant impact on coronary artery disease (CAD). We aimed to determine on patients with CAD the relationships between Trans fatty acids (Trans FA) and different CAD associated parameters such as inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in addition to Gensini score as a vascular severity index. METHODS: Fatty acid profiles were established by gas chromatography from 111 CAD patients compared to 120 age-matched control group...
March 15, 2018: Lipids in Health and Disease
So Yoon Han, Nan Hee Kim, Do Hoon Kim, Kyungdo Han, Seon Mee Kim
BACKGROUND: The prevalence of childhood obesity has significantly increased in Korea. This study aimed to use data from the 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) to investigate the association between sodium (Na) intake and insulin resistance in children and adolescents with obesity. METHODS: The study population consisted of 578 adolescents aged 12-18 years who were enrolled in the 2010 KNHANES. Subjects were classified into the following four groups based on their body mass index (BMI) and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values: normal BMI and HOMA-IR (Group 1), normal BMI and ≥75% HOMA-IR (Group 2), ≥85% BMI and normal HOMA-IR (Group 3) and ≥85% BMI and ≥75% HOMA-IR (Group 4)...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology & Metabolism: JPEM
Paola Cipriani, Vasiliky Liakouli, Francesco Carubbi, Onorina Berardicurti, Paola Di Benedetto, Francesco Ciccia, Giuliana Guggino, Saverio Alvaro, Giovanni Triolo, Roberto Giacomellia, Piero Ruscitti
BACKGROUND: Although in the past, prevention of the joint destruction and disability were strongly emphasised in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), at present, a growing body of evidence is focused at identifying the best management of associated comorbidities, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, the hypothesis that blocking pro-inflammatory activity may be helpful in the treatment of some comorbidities has been proposed in RA patients. OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the role of IL-1β during RA and T2D, the efficacy of IL-1 blocking agents in controlling both diseases and, possible, decreasing the concomitant enhanced atherosclerotic process...
March 13, 2018: Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials
Brijesh Kumar, John L Sorensen, Silvia T Cardona
Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic bacterium that can thrive in different environments, including the amino acid-rich mucus of the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. B. cenocepacia responds to the nutritional conditions that mimic the CF sputum by increasing flagellin expression and swimming motility. Individual amino acids also induce swimming but not flagellin expression. Here, we show that modulation of the second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) levels by the PAS-containing c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, BCAL1069 (CdpA), regulates the swimming motility of B...
2018: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
José F Muñoz, Juan G McEwen, Oliver K Clay, Christina A Cuomo
Dimorphic fungal pathogens cause a significant human disease burden and unlike most fungal pathogens affect immunocompetent hosts. To examine the origin of virulence of these fungal pathogens, we compared genomes of classic systemic, opportunistic, and non-pathogenic species, including Emmonsia and two basal branching, non-pathogenic species in the Ajellomycetaceae, Helicocarpus griseus and Polytolypa hystricis. We found that gene families related to plant degradation, secondary metabolites synthesis, and amino acid and lipid metabolism are retained in H...
March 14, 2018: Scientific Reports
Zixing Dong, Xiaoling Chen, Ke Cai, Zhixin Chen, Hongbin Wang, Peng Jin, Xiaoguang Liu, Kugenthiren Permaul, Suren Singh, Zhengxiang Wang
Due to its high protein secretion capacity, simple nutritional requirements and the GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status, Bacillus licheniformis is widely used as a host for the industrial production of enzymes, antibiotics and peptides. However, as compared with its close relative B. subtilis , little is known about physiology and stress responses of B. licheniformis . To explore its temperature-stress metabolome, strains B. licheniformis ATCC 14580 and B186, with respective optimal growth temperatures of 42°C and 50°C, were cultured at 42°C, 50°C and 60°C and their corresponding metabolic profiles determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and multivariate statistical analyses...
March 15, 2018: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
P Cordero, J Li, J A Oben
Obesity is the pandemic of the 21st century. Obesity comorbidities, including hypertension, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance define metabolic syndrome, which increases mortality risk and decreases the quality of life. Compared with lifestyles (diet and physical activity) and pharmacological interventions, bariatric surgery is by far the most effective treatment for obesity and its comorbidities. This minimally invasive surgical treatment is based on an increase of satiety (by hormonal regulation and decreasing stomach volume) or a decrease in nutrient retention (gastric and/or intestinal resection)...
December 2017: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh
Aifric O'Sullivan, Jaime Salcedo, Josep Rubert
Our daily food intake provides the nutrients to maintain health. However, in addition to the nutritional values, food can promote health and be beneficial in preventing diseases. Human milk is a unique food source that contains essential nutrients in the right balance and other bioactive factors that make it the ideal food for all healthy term infants. Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) play an important role in health, at several levels: acting as prebiotics promoting the growth of beneficial bacterial strains, preventing the growth of pathogenic bacteria in the intestine, and modulating the immune response against bacterial infections...
March 13, 2018: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Eva Nüsken, Jörg Dötsch, Lutz T Weber, Kai-Dietrich Nüsken
Chronic kidney disease affects more than 10% of the population. Programming studies have examined the interrelationship between environmental factors in early life and differences in morbidity and mortality between individuals. A number of important principles has been identified, namely permanent structural modifications of organs and cells, long-lasting adjustments of endocrine regulatory circuits, as well as altered gene transcription. Risk factors include intrauterine deficiencies by disturbed placental function or maternal malnutrition, prematurity, intrauterine and postnatal stress, intrauterine and postnatal overnutrition, as well as dietary dysbalances in postnatal life...
2018: Frontiers in Pediatrics
Wenkai Ren, Ranjith Rajendran, Yuanyuan Zhao, Bie Tan, Guoyao Wu, Fuller W Bazer, Guoqiang Zhu, Yuanyi Peng, Xiaoshan Huang, Jinping Deng, Yulong Yin
The interaction between host and pathogen decidedly shapes the outcome of an infection, thus understanding this interaction is critical to the treatment of a pathogen-induced infection. Although research in this area of cell biology has yielded surprising findings regarding interactions between host and pathogen, understanding of the metabolic cross talk between host and pathogen is limited. At the site of infection, host and pathogen share similar or identical nutritional substrates and generate common metabolic products, thus metabolic cross talk between host and pathogen could profoundly affect the pathogenesis of an infection...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
(no author information available yet)
Trace elements are dietary elements which are needed in very minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism, which play a crucial part in energy metabolism and material transformation. It's generally agreed that trace elements are essential components of parenteral nutrition. These societies for parenteral and enteral nutrition in Europe, the United States and Australia proposed that various trace elements should be provided daily from commencement for all patients receiving parenteral nutrition and published some guidelines on adult trace elements recommendations for parenteral nutrition...
March 1, 2018: Zhonghua Wai Ke za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Surgery]
Aline Marcadenti, Larissa Loures Mendes, Estela Iraci Rabito, Jaqueline da Silva Fink, Flávia Moraes Silva
BACKGROUND: There are many nutrition screening tools currently being applied in hospitals to identify risk of malnutrition. However, multivariate statistical models are not usually employed to take into account the importance of each variable included in the instrument's development. OBJECTIVE: To develop and evaluate the concurrent and predictive validities of a new screening tool of nutrition risk. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was developed, in which 4 nutrition screening tools were applied to all patients...
March 13, 2018: JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Detlef Ulrich, Steffen Kecke, Klaus Olbricht
The strawberry, with its unique aroma, is one of the most popular fruits worldwide. The demand for specific knowledge of metabolism in strawberries is increasing. This knowledge is applicable for genetic studies, plant breeding, resistance research, nutritional science, and the processing industry. The molecular basis of strawberry aroma has been studied for more than 80 years. Thus far, hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOC) have been identified. The qualitative composition of the strawberry volatilome remains controversial though considerable progress has been made during the past several decades...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Paul J Moughan
Traditionally, the study of nutrition has been based on a reductionist approach, reducing a food down to constituent nutrients and then investigating the effects of these nutrients, either singly or together, on metabolism and metabolic outcomes. However, nutrients per se are not consumed by a person, but rather are consumed in the form of foods. Because of this the complex food matrix itself influences nutritional outcomes, which can often not be fully explained on the basis of the effects of "the sum of the nutrients" alone...
March 13, 2018: Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Bozidarka L Zaric, Milan Obradovic, Vladan Bajic, Mohamed A Haidara, Milos Jovanovic, Esma R Isenovic
Homocysteine (Hcy) is thiol group containing the amino acid, which naturally occurs in all humans. Hcy is degraded in the body through two metabolic pathways, while a minor part is excreted through kidneys. The chemical reactions that are necessary for degradation of Hcy require the presence of the folic acid, vitamins B6 and B12. Consequently, the level of the total Hcy in the serum is influenced by the presence or absence of these vitamins. An elevated level of the Hcy, hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and homocystinuria are connected with occlusive artery disease, especially in the brain, the heart, and the kidney, in addition to venous thrombosis, chronic renal failure, megaloblastic anemia, osteoporosis, depression, Alzheimer's disease, pregnancy problems, and others...
March 12, 2018: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Ashley Ratliff, Amy Nishnick, Robert DeChicco, Rocio Lopez
BACKGROUND: Hyperglycemia is a common adverse event associated with parenteral nutrition (PN); however, there is no consensus on optimal glucose monitoring. Unnecessary point-of-care (POC) blood glucose (BG) testing can result in additional healthcare cost and discomfort to the patient. This study's aim was to determine whether decreasing the frequency of POC glucose testing in patients receiving PN can reduce costs without increasing the frequency of glycemic events. METHODS: This study examined adult, noncritically ill patients who require PN and are managed by a nutrition support team...
March 12, 2018: Nutrition in Clinical Practice
Gabriel Maciel, Luisa Servioli, Carlotta Nannini, Alvise Berti, Cynthia S Crowson, Sara J Achenbach, Eric L Matteson, Divi Cornec
Objective: To determine rates and primary discharge diagnoses of hospitalisation in a cohort of patients with incident primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) compared with the general population. Methods: This was a retrospective population-based cohort study focused on Olmsted County, Minnesota. The pSS cohort consisted of patients with incident pSS in the 1976-2015 period and was compared with a cohort of individuals without pSS matched 3:1 for age, sex and calendar year, randomly selected from the same population...
2018: RMD Open
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