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Eye movement

Xiaona Zhang, Xiaoxuan Sun, Junhong Wang, Liou Tang, Anmu Xie
Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is thought to be one of the most frequent preceding symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the prevalence of RBD in PD stated in the published studies is still inconsistent. We conducted a meta and meta-regression analysis in this paper to estimate the pooled prevalence. We searched the electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE and EBSCO up to June 2016 for related articles. STATA 12.0 statistics software was used to calculate the available data from each research...
October 21, 2016: Neurological Sciences
Georgie Powell, Zoe Meredith, Rebecca McMillin, Tom C A Freeman
According to Bayesian models, perception and cognition depend on the optimal combination of noisy incoming evidence with prior knowledge of the world. Individual differences in perception should therefore be jointly determined by a person's sensitivity to incoming evidence and his or her prior expectations. It has been proposed that individuals with autism have flatter prior distributions than do nonautistic individuals, which suggests that prior variance is linked to the degree of autistic traits in the general population...
October 21, 2016: Psychological Science
Britta Kristina Ischebeck, Jurryt de Vries, Jos N Van der Geest, Malou Janssen, Jan Paul Van Wingerden, Gert Jan Kleinrensink, Maarten A Frens
BACKGROUND: Many people with Whiplash Associated Disorders (WAD) report problems with vision, some of which may be due to impaired eye movements. Better understanding of such impaired eye movements could improve diagnostics and treatment strategies. This systematic review surveys the current evidence on changes in eye movements of patients with WAD and explains how the oculomotor system is tested. METHODS: Nine electronic data bases were searched for relevant articles from inception until September 2015...
October 21, 2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Daniel Leightley, Moi Hoon Yap, Jessica Coulson, Mathew Piasecki, James Cameron, Yoann Barnouin, Jon Tobias, Jamie S McPhee
The aim of this study was to compare postural sway during a series of static balancing tasks and during five chair rises between healthy young (mean (SEM) age 26(1) yrs), healthy old (age 67(1) yrs) and master athlete runners (age 67(1) yrs; competing and training for the previous 51(5) yrs) using the Microsoft Kinect One. The healthy old had more sway than young in all balance tasks. The master athletes had similar sway to young during two-leg balancing and one leg standing with eyes open. When balancing on one-leg with eyes closed, both the healthy old and the master athletes had around 17-fold more sway than young...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Jürgen Keller, Martin Gorges, Helena E A Aho-Özhan, Ingo Uttner, Erich Schneider, Jan Kassubek, Elmar H Pinkhardt, Albert C Ludolph, Dorothée Lulé
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disorder with pathological involvement of upper and lower motoneurons, subsequently leading to progressive loss of motor and speech abilities. In addition, cognitive functions are impaired in a subset of patients. To evaluate these potential deficits in severely physically impaired ALS patients, eye-tracking is a promising means to conduct cognitive tests. The present article focuses on how eye movements, an indirect means of communication for physically disabled patients, can be utilized to allow for detailed neuropsychological assessment...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
Justin Chamberland, Annie Roy-Charland, Melanie Perron, Joël Dickinson
The perceptual-attentional limitation hypothesis posits that the confusion between emotional facial expressions of fear and surprise may be due to their visual similarity, with shared muscle movements. In Experiment 1 full face images of fear and surprise varying as a function of distinctiveness (mouth index, brow index or both indices) were displayed in a gender oddball task. Experiment 2, in a similar task, directed attention towards the eye or mouth region with a blurring technique. The current two studies used response time and event-related potentials (ERP) to test the perceptual-attentional limitation hypothesis...
October 21, 2016: Social Neuroscience
Umberto Melia, Eva Gabarron, Mercé Agustí, Nuria Souto, Patricia Pineda, Joan Fontanet, Montserrat Vallverdu, Erik Weber Jensen, Pedro Gambus
The objective of this work is to compare the performances of two electroencephalogram based indices for detecting loss of consciousness and loss of response to nociceptive stimulation. Specifically, their behaviour after drug induction and during recovery of consciousness was pointed out. Data was recorded from 140 patients scheduled for general anaesthesia with a combination of propofol and remifentanil. The qCON 2000 monitor (Quantium Medical, Barcelona, Spain) was used to calculate the qCON and qNOX. Loss of response to verbal command and loss of eye-lash reflex were assessed during the transition from awake to anesthetized, defining the state of loss of consciousness...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Nicola Cellini
In recent years sleep-related memory consolidation has become a central topic in the sleep research field. Several studies have shown that in healthy individuals sleep promotes memory consolidation. Notwithstanding this, the consequences of sleep disorders on offline memory consolidation remain poorly investigated. Research studies indicate that patients with insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, and narcolepsy often exhibit sleep-related impairment in the consolidation of declarative and procedural information...
September 25, 2016: Sleep Medicine Reviews
Paul C Knox, Ian J C MacCormick, Emme Mbale, Macpherson Malewa, Gabriela Czanner, Simon P Harding
Paediatric cerebral malaria is the most serious complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. While the majority recover, long-term cognitive impairment has been highlighted as a significant and neglected problem. Persistent or serious deficits in processes such as attention or behavioural inhibition should be manifest in changes to performance on oculomotor tasks. Therefore we investigated the impact of cerebral malaria on the development of reflexive pro-saccades and antisaccades. In a longitudinal study, 47 children previously admitted with retinopathy-confirmed cerebral malaria (mean age at admission 54 months), were compared with 37 local healthy controls (mean ages at first study visit 117 and 110 months respectively)...
2016: PloS One
Jana Annina Müller, Dorothea Wendt, Birger Kollmeier, Thomas Brand
The aim of this study was to validate a procedure for performing the audio-visual paradigm introduced by Wendt et al. (2015) with reduced practical challenges. The original paradigm records eye fixations using an eye tracker and calculates the duration of sentence comprehension based on a bootstrap procedure. In order to reduce practical challenges, we first reduced the measurement time by evaluating a smaller measurement set with fewer trials. The results of 16 listeners showed effects comparable to those obtained when testing the original full measurement set on a different collective of listeners...
2016: PloS One
Rachel A Ryskin, Zhenghan Qi, Melissa C Duff, Sarah Brown-Schmidt
Verbs often participate in more than 1 syntactic structure, but individual verbs can be biased in terms of whether they are used more often with 1 structure or the other. For instance, in a sentence such as "Bop the bunny with the flower," the phrase "with the flower" is more likely to indicate an instrument with which to "bop," rather than which "bunny" to bop. Conversely, in a sentence such as "Choose the cow with the flower," the phrase "with the flower" is more likely to indicate which "cow" to choose. An open question is where these biases come from and whether they continue to be shaped in adulthood in a way that has lasting consequences for real-time processing of language...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Sven Ohl, Martin Rolfs
Visual short-term memory (VSTM) is a crucial repository of information when events unfold rapidly before our eyes, yet it maintains only a fraction of the sensory information encoded by the visual system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that saccadic eye movements provide a natural bottleneck for the transition of fragile content in sensory memory to VSTM. In 4 experiments, we show that saccades, planned and executed after the disappearance of a memory array, markedly bias visual memory performance. First, items that had appeared at the saccade target were more readily remembered than items that had appeared elsewhere, even though the saccade was irrelevant to the memory task (Experiment 1)...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Ingo Fietze, Charlotte Barthe, Matthias Hölzl, Martin Glos, Sandra Zimmermann, Ralf Bauer-Diefenbach, Thomas Penzel
INTRODUCTION: Noise is one of the factors that can seriously disturb sleep, and sound volume is an important factor in this context. One strategy involves avoiding exposure to sounds in the night, while entail the minimization of background noise in a bedroom. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of systematic sound attenuation on nocturnal sleep by influencing sound volume and reverberation within the context of room acoustics. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On this basis, we designed a randomized, controlled crossover trial investigating 24 healthy sleepers (15 men and 9 women, aged 24...
September 2016: Noise & Health
Miki Nakamura, Kazutaka Jin, Kazuhiro Kato, Hisashi Itabashi, Masaki Iwasaki, Yosuke Kakisaka, Nobukazu Nakasato
To investigate whether seizure lateralization affects sleep macrostructure in patients with left and right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is shorter in patients with right hemispheric cerebral infarction than with left. We retrospectively analyzed data from 16 patients with TLE (6 men and 10 women aged 34.9 ± 11.4 years) who underwent polysomnography as well as long-term video electroencephalography. Ten patients were diagnosed with left TLE and six patients with right TLE...
October 19, 2016: Neurological Sciences
Rongxin Chen, Guofu Huang, Shu Liu, Wenfang Ma, Xiaofang Yin, Shiyou Zhou
PURPOSE: This study compared the outcomes of a limbal conjunctival autograft (LCAG) with those of an amniotic membrane graft (AMG) followed by intraoperative 0.02 % mitomycin C (MMC) to treat recurrent pterygium. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, ninety-six eyes with recurrent pterygium were enrolled and randomly allocated into two groups using a computer-generated random number table. Pterygium removal was followed by intraoperative 0.02 % MMC for 3 min and then either LCAG or AMG transplantation...
October 20, 2016: Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
Chien-Cheng Chen, Christopher J Bockisch, Dominik Straumann, Melody Ying-Yu Huang
Spontaneous eye movements of zebrafish larvae in the dark consist of centrifugal saccades that move the eyes from a central to an eccentric position and postsaccadic centripetal drifts. In a previous study, we showed that the fitted single-exponential time constants of the postsaccadic drifts are longer in the temporal-to-nasal (T->N) direction than in the nasal-to-temporal (N->T) direction. In the present study, we further report that saccadic peak velocities are higher and saccadic amplitudes are larger in the N->T direction than in the T->N direction...
2016: Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience
Akiyoshi Ishikawa, Keita Sakai, Takehiro Maki, Yuri Mizuno, Kimie Niimi, Yasuhiro Oda, Eiki Takahashi
To understand sleep mechanisms and develop treatments for sleep disorders, investigations using animal models are essential. The sleep architecture of rodents differs from that of diurnal mammals including humans and non-human primates. Sleep studies have been conducted in non-human primates; however, these sleep assessments were performed on animals placed in a restraint chair connected via the umbilical area to the recording apparatus. To avoid restraints, cables, and other stressful apparatuses and manipulations, telemetry systems have been developed...
October 18, 2016: Experimental Animals
Carey D Balaban, Joseph M Furman
This study provides the first clear evidence that the generation of optokinetic nystagmus fast phases is a decision process that is influenced by performance of a concurrent disjunctive reaction time task (DRT). Ten subjects performed an auditory DRT during constant velocity optokinetic stimulation. Eye movements were measured in three dimensions with a magnetic search coil. Slow phase (SP) durations were defined as the interval between fast phases (FPs). There were three main findings. Firstly, human optokinetic nystagmus SP durations are consistent with a model of a Gaussian basic interval generator (a type of biological clock), such that FPs can be triggered randomly at the end of a clock cycle (mean duration: 200-250 ms); Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests could not reject the modeled cumulative distribution for any data trials...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Neurophysiology
Sarah J White, Denis Drieghe, Simon P Liversedge, Adrian Staub
The effect of word frequency on eye movement behaviour during reading has been reported in many experimental studies. However, the vast majority of these studies compared only two levels of word frequency (high and low). Here we assess whether the effect of log word frequency on eye movement measures is linear, in an experiment in which a critical target word in each sentence was at one of three approximately equally spaced log frequency levels. Separate analyses treated log frequency as a categorical or a continuous predictor...
October 20, 2016: Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology: QJEP
Verónica Pérez-Schuster, Anirudh Kulkarni, Morgane Nouvian, Sebastián A Romano, Konstantinos Lygdas, Adrien Jouary, Mario Dippopa, Thomas Pietri, Mathieu Haudrechy, Virginie Candat, Jonathan Boulanger-Weill, Vincent Hakim, Germán Sumbre
Following moving visual stimuli (conditioning stimuli, CS), many organisms perceive, in the absence of physical stimuli, illusory motion in the opposite direction. This phenomenon is known as the motion aftereffect (MAE). Here, we use MAE as a tool to study the neuronal basis of visual motion perception in zebrafish larvae. Using zebrafish eye movements as an indicator of visual motion perception, we find that larvae perceive MAE. Blocking eye movements using optogenetics during CS presentation did not affect MAE, but tectal ablation significantly weakened it...
October 18, 2016: Cell Reports
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