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Genomic instability cancer

Fausto Petrelli, Sandro Barni, Giacomo Bregni, Filippo de Braud, Serena Di Cosimo
BACKGROUND: The interest in platinum salts in breast cancer (BC) therapy has been recently renewed as inhibition of DNA damage response may enhance the effects of DNA-damaging agents in BC tumors with high genomic instability. The present systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials were performed to assess the efficacy and safety of therapy with platinum salts in patients with locally advanced or metastatic (hereinafter advanced) BC. METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and CINAHL for phase II/III clinical trials that assessed efficacy of platinum-based therapy in patients with advanced BC...
October 21, 2016: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
Christina Gutierrez Bracamontes, Rebecca Lopez-Valdez, Ramadevi Subramani, Arunkumar Arumugam, Sushmita Nandy, Venkatesh Rajamanickam, Vignesh Ravichandran, Rajkumar Lakshmanaswamy
Early parity reduces the risk of breast cancer in women while nulliparity and late parity increase the risk of breast cancer. In order to translate this protection to women where early pregnancy is not feasible, much work has focused on understanding how parity confers protection against breast cancer, the molecular mechanisms by which this occurs is still not well understood. Healthy parous and nulliparous women were recruited for this study. We assessed serum protein profiles of early parous, late parous, and nulliparous women using the Phospho Explorer antibody array...
October 19, 2016: Oncotarget
Rui Zhang, Chang Liu, Yahan Niu, Ying Jing, Haiyang Zhang, Jin Wang, Jie Yang, Ke Zen, Junfeng Zhang, Chen-Yu Zhang, Donghai Li
The DNA damage response is critical for maintaining genome integrity and preventing damage to DNA due to endogenous and exogenous insults. Mitomycin C (MMC), a potent DNA cross-linker, is used as a chemotherapeutic agent because it causes DNA inter-strand cross-links (DNA ICLs) in cancer cells. While many microRNAs, which may serve as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, are grossly dysregulated in human cancers, little is known about their roles in MMC-treated lung cancer. Here, we report that miR-128-3p can attenuate repair of DNA ICLs by targeting SPTAN1 (αII Sp), resulting in cell cycle arrest and promoting chromosomal aberrations in lung cancer cells treated with MMC...
September 28, 2016: Oncotarget
Ya-Qin Tan, Jing Zhang, Gang Zhou
Macroautophagy/autophagy is a conserved lysosomal degradation process essential for cell physiology and human health. By regulating apoptosis, inflammation, pathogen clearance, immune response and other cellular processes, autophagy acts as a modulator of pathogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in diverse diseases. With regard to oral disease, autophagy can be problematic either when it is activated or impaired, because this process is involved in diverse functions, depending on the specific disease and its level of progression...
October 20, 2016: Autophagy
Anya Alayev, Rachel S Salamon, Subrata Manna, Naomi S Schwartz, Adi Y Berman, Marina K Holz
Homologous recombination (HR) is a conserved process that maintains genome stability and cell survival by repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The RAD51-related family of proteins is involved in repair of DSBs; consequently, deregulation of RAD51 causes chromosomal rearrangements and stimulates tumorigenesis. RAD51C has been identified as a potential tumor suppressor and a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. Recent studies have also implicated estrogen as a DNA-damaging agent that causes DSBs...
October 18, 2016: Cell Cycle
Qing Yang, Yingqiu Xie, Lixia Miao
Cancers induced by gene mutation, deletion, and genome instability might be related to aging. With similar pathways of aging but distinct functions, senescence at the cellular level is an irreversible arrest of cell cycle. Senescence has long been believed as a barrier to restrict tumor expansion. However, more and more evidence has been shown that senescence inducers regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cell self-renewal, inflammatory response, crosstalk with the oncogenic bypass signaling, and conversion of oncogene to tumor suppressor...
October 18, 2016: Cancer Investigation
Daniel Nava Rodrigues, Gunther Boysen, Semini Sumanasuriya, George Seed, Angelo M De Marzo, Johann de Bono
Prostate cancer (PCa) is a clinically heterogeneous disease and current treatment strategies are based largely on anatomical and pathological parameters. In the recent past, several DNA sequencing studies of primary and advanced PCa have revealed recurrent patterns of genomic aberrations that expose mechanisms of resistance to available therapies and potential new drug targets. Suppression of androgen receptor (AR) signalling is the cornerstone of advanced prostate cancer treatment. Genomic aberrations of the androgen receptor or alternative splicing of its mRNA are increasingly recognized as biomarkers of resistance to AR-targeted therapy such as abiraterone or enzalutamide...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Nicole E McNeil, Hesed M Padilla-Nash, Floryne O Buishand, Yue Hue, Thomas Ried
Human colorectal carcinomas are defined by a non-random distribution of genomic imbalances that are characteristic for this disease. Often, these imbalances affect entire chromosomes. Understanding the role of these aneuploidies for carcinogenesis is of utmost importance. Currently, established transgenic mice do not recapitulate the pathognonomic genome aberration profile of human colorectal carcinomas. We have developed a novel model based on the spontaneous transformation of murine colon epithelial cells...
October 17, 2016: Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer
Joo Hwa Lee, Nam Jin Yoo, Min Sung Kim, Sug Hyung Lee
Alterations of genes involved in histone modification are common in cancers. A histone demethylase-encoding gene PHF2 is considered a putative tumor suppressor gene (TSG). PHF2 is essential for p53-mediated TSG functions such as chemotherapy-mediated cancer cell killing. However, inactivating mutations of PHF2 that could inactivate its functions are not reported in cancers. In a genome database, we observed that the PHF2 gene possessed mononucleotide repeats, which could be mutated in cancers with high microsatellite instability (MSI-H)...
October 15, 2016: Pathology Oncology Research: POR
Otília Menyhárt, Hajnalka Harami-Papp, Saraswati Sukumar, Reinhold Schäfer, Luca Magnani, Oriol de Barrios, Balázs Győrffy
The hallmarks of cancer capture the most essential phenotypic characteristics of malignant transformation and progression. Although numerous factors involved in this multi-step process are still unknown to date, an ever-increasing number of mutated/altered candidate genes are being identified within large-scale cancer genomic projects. Therefore, investigators need to be aware of available and appropriate techniques capable of determining characteristic features of each hallmark. We review the methods tailored to experimental cancer researchers to evaluate cell proliferation, programmed cell death, replicative immortality, induction of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, genome instability, and reprogramming of energy metabolism...
October 11, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Yan Sun, Ping Ji, Tao Chen, Xinhui Zhou, Da Yang, Yuhong Guo, Yuexin Liu, Limei Hu, Dianren Xia, Yanxue Liu, Asha S Multani, Ilya Shmulevich, Raju Kucherlapati, Scott Kopetz, Anil K Sood, Stanley R Hamilton, Baocun Sun, Wei Zhang
The gene encoding Migration and Invasion Inhibitory Protein (MIIP), located on 1p36.22, is a potential tumour suppressor gene in glioma. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and mechanism of action of MIIP in colorectal cancer (CRC). MIIP protein expression gradually decreased along the colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence and was negatively correlated with lymph node and distant metastasis in 526 colorectal tissue samples (P<0.05 for all). Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data showed that decreased MIIP expression was significantly associated with MIIP hemizygous deletion (P=0...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Jessica Woodward, Gillian C Taylor, Dinesh C Soares, Shelagh Boyle, Daoud Sie, David Read, Keerthi Chathoth, Milica Vukovic, Nuria Tarrats, David Jamieson, Kirsteen J Campbell, Karen Blyth, Juan Carlos Acosta, Bauke Ylstra, Mark J Arends, Kamil R Kranc, Andrew P Jackson, Wendy A Bickmore, Andrew J Wood
Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of cancer, but mitotic regulators are rarely mutated in tumors. Mutations in the condensin complexes, which restructure chromosomes to facilitate segregation during mitosis, are significantly enriched in cancer genomes, but experimental evidence implicating condensin dysfunction in tumorigenesis is lacking. We report that mice inheriting missense mutations in a condensin II subunit (Caph2(nes)) develop T-cell lymphoma. Before tumors develop, we found that the same Caph2 mutation impairs ploidy maintenance to a different extent in different hematopoietic cell types, with ploidy most severely perturbed at the CD4(+)CD8(+) T-cell stage from which tumors initiate...
October 13, 2016: Genes & Development
Ju Hwa Lee, Nam Jin Yoo, Min Sung Kim, Chang Hyeok An, Sug Hyung Lee
Loss of ZMPSTE24 is related to progeroid phenotypes in human. Cells in zmpste24-deficient mice show delayed DNA damage response, increased aneuploidy and increased genomic instability, which are considered features of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to address whether ZMPSTE24 gene was mutated in colorectal cancers (CRCs) and gastric (GCs), and its expression was altered. ZMPSTE24 possesses a T9 mononucleotide repeat in an exon, which could be mutated in cancers with defects in mismatch repair that can result in microsatellite instability (MSI)...
October 6, 2016: Pathology, Research and Practice
Panagiotis Kotsantis, Lara Marques Silva, Sarah Irmscher, Rebecca M Jones, Lisa Folkes, Natalia Gromak, Eva Petermann
Cancer is a disease associated with genomic instability that often results from oncogene activation. This in turn leads to hyperproliferation and replication stress. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie oncogene-induced replication stress are still poorly understood. Oncogenes such as HRAS(V12) promote proliferation by upregulating general transcription factors to stimulate RNA synthesis. Here we investigate whether this increase in transcription underlies oncogene-induced replication stress. We show that in cells overexpressing HRAS(V12), elevated expression of the general transcription factor TATA-box binding protein (TBP) leads to increased RNA synthesis, which together with R-loop accumulation results in replication fork slowing and DNA damage...
October 11, 2016: Nature Communications
Clara Soria-Valles, Alejandro López-Soto, Fernando G Osorio, Carlos López-Otín
Genome instability is a hallmark of both cancer and aging processes. Beyond cell-autonomous responses, it is known that DNA damage also elicits systemic mechanisms aimed at favoring survival and damaged cells clearance. Among these mechanisms, immune activation and NF-κB-mediated inflammation play central roles in organismal control of DNA damage. We focus herein on the different experimental evidences that have allowed gaining mechanistic insight about this relationship. We also describe the functional consequences of defective immune function in cancer development and age-related alterations...
October 5, 2016: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development
Josep Sardanyés, Regina Martínez, Carles Simó, Ricard Solé
The dynamics of heterogeneous tumor cell populations competing with healthy cells is an important topic in cancer research with deep implications in biomedicine. Multitude of theoretical and computational models have addressed this issue, especially focusing on the nature of the transitions governing tumor clearance as some relevant model parameters are tuned. In this contribution, we analyze a mathematical model of unstable tumor progression using the quasispecies framework. Our aim is to define a minimal model incorporating the dynamics of competition between healthy cells and a heterogeneous population of cancer cell phenotypes involving changes in replication-related genes (i...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Mathematical Biology
Aiste McCormick, Peter Donoghue, Michelle Dixon, Richard O'Sullivan, Rachel Louise O'Donnell, James Murray, Angelika Kaufmann, Nicola J Curtin, Richard J Edmondson
PURPOSE: DNA damage defects are common in ovarian cancer and can be used to stratify treatment. Although most work has focussed on Homologous Recombination (HR), DNA double strand breaks are repaired primarily by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Defects in NHEJ have been shown to contribute to genomic instability and have been associated with the development of chemoresistance. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: NHEJ was assessed in a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines and 47 primary ascitic derived ovarian cancer cultures, by measuring the ability of cell extracts to end-join linearized plasmid monomers into multimers...
October 4, 2016: Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Brittany Barreto, Elizabeth Rogers, Jun Xia, Ryan L Frisch, Megan Richters, Devon M Fitzgerald, Susan M Rosenberg
: Microbes and human cells possess mechanisms of mutagenesis activated by stress responses. Stress-inducible mutagenesis mechanisms may provide important models for mutagenesis that drives host-pathogen interactions, antibiotic resistance, and possibly much of evolution generally. In Escherichia coli, repair of DNA double-strand breaks is switched to a mutagenic mode, using error-prone DNA polymerases, via the SOS DNA-damage and the general (σ(S)) stress responses. We investigated small RNA (sRNA) clients of Hfq, an RNA chaperone that promotes mutagenic break repair (MBR), and found that GcvB promotes MBR by allowing a robust σ(S) response, achieved via opposing the membrane stress (σ(E)) response...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Bacteriology
Jia You, Jia Liu, Yantao Bao, Liqun Wang, Yang Yu, Lei Wang, Di Wu, Chang Liu, Nan Wang, Fei Wang, Falin Wang, Lu Xu, Xing Tian, Hongbin Liang, Yating Gao, Rongwei Guan, Jing Bai, Xiangning Meng, Wenjing Sun, Xin-Yuan Guan, Chunyu Zhang, Songbin Fu, Yan Jin
Previous studies have shown that the oncogene SEI1 is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas, and promoting genomic instability. However, the molecular mechanism of SEI1 in promoting genomic instability remains unclear. We observed SEI1 overexpression in 30 of 46 cases of ovarian cancer compared to non-tumor tissues and the overexpression of SEI1 was positively associated with the tumor FIGO stage. Our functional studies revealed that overexpression of SEI1 could induce genomic instability and increased DNA strand breaks...
October 3, 2016: Cancer Letters
Ronald J Hause, Colin C Pritchard, Jay Shendure, Stephen J Salipante
Microsatellite instability (MSI), the spontaneous loss or gain of nucleotides from repetitive DNA tracts, is a diagnostic phenotype for gastrointestinal, endometrial, and colorectal tumors, yet the landscape of instability events across a wider variety of cancer types remains poorly understood. To explore MSI across malignancies, we examined 5,930 cancer exomes from 18 cancer types at more than 200,000 microsatellite loci and constructed a genomic classifier for MSI. We identified MSI-positive tumors in 14 of the 18 cancer types...
October 3, 2016: Nature Medicine
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