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Helena Mihaljević-Brandt, Lucía Santamaría, Marco Tullney
Despite the increasing number of women graduating in mathematics, a systemic gender imbalance persists and is signified by a pronounced gender gap in the distribution of active researchers and professors. Especially at the level of university faculty, women mathematicians continue being drastically underrepresented, decades after the first affirmative action measures have been put into place. A solid publication record is of paramount importance for securing permanent positions. Thus, the question arises whether the publication patterns of men and women mathematicians differ in a significant way...
2016: PloS One
Michael Argenyi
Applicants to medical schools who are deaf and hard of hearing (DHoH) or who have other disabilities face significant barriers to medical school admission. One commonly cited barrier to admission is medical schools' technical standards (TS) for admission, advancement, and graduation. Ethical values of diversity and equity support altering the technical standards to be more inclusive of people with disabilities. Incorporating these values into admissions, advancement, and graduation considerations for DHoH and other students with disabilities can contribute to the physician workforce being more representative of the diverse patients it serves and better able to care for them...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Joel A DeLisa, Jacob Jay Lindenthal
Although progress has been made in diversifying medical school admissions and faculty, this has not extended to physicians with physical disabilities. To improve our understanding of medical students and physicians with physical and sensory disabilities, the authors propose systematically gathering information on the needs and experiences of four groups: physicians who had disabilities before beginning practice, physicians whose disabilities were incurred during their medical careers, physicians drawn from those two groups, and patients of physicians with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Clay Cothren Burlew, Kimberly A Davis, John J Fildes, Thomas J Esposito, Christopher J Dente, Gregory J Jurkovich
Over the past decade, the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma (AAST) Acute Care Surgery (ACS) fellowship program has matured to 20 verified programs. As part of an ongoing curricular evaluation, we queried the current practice patterns of the graduates of ACS fellowship programs regarding their view on their ACS training. Surveys were submitted by 56 of 77 graduates for a completion rate of 73%. While 93% of graduates practice in urban/suburban areas, there was a mixture of University, University-affiliated, and community institutions and an almost even division of level I and II designation...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Paula Ferrada, Rao R Ivatury, David A Spain, Kimberly A Davis, Michel Aboutanos, John J Fildes, Thomas M Scalea
INTRODUCTION: Acute Care Surgery (ACS), Trauma and Surgical Critical Care (SCC) fellowships graduate fellows deemed qualified to perform complex cases immediately upon graduation. We hypothesize international fellow rotations (IFR) can be a resource to supplement operative case exposure METHODS: A survey was sent to all program directors of ACS and SCC fellowships via email. Data was captured and analyzed using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) tool. RESULTS: The survey was sent to 113 program directors (PDs) with a response rate of 42%...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Heather K Spence Laschinger, Emily A Read
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the influence of authentic leadership, person-job fit with 6 areas of worklife, and civility norms on coworker incivility and burnout among new graduate nurses. BACKGROUND: New graduate nurses report experiencing high levels of workplace incivility from coworkers, which has been found to negatively impact their job and career satisfaction and increase their intention to leave. The role of civility norms in preventing burnout and subsequent exposure to incivility from coworkers has yet to be examined among new graduate nurses...
November 2016: Journal of Nursing Administration
Yoon Soo Park, Matthew Lineberry, Abbas Hyderi, Georges Bordage, Kuan Xing, Rachel Yudkowsky
PURPOSE: Medical schools administer locally developed graduation competency examinations (GCEs) following the structure of the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Skills that combine standardized patient (SP)-based physical examination and the patient note (PN) to create integrated clinical encounter (ICE) scores. This study examines how different subcomponent scoring weights in a locally developed GCE affect composite score reliability and pass-fail decisions for ICE scores, contributing to internal structure and consequential validity evidence...
November 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Kenneth Silverman, August F Holtyn, Reed Morrison
Research on a model Therapeutic Workplace has allowed for evaluation of the use of employment in the treatment of drug addiction. Under the Therapeutic Workplace intervention, adults with histories of drug addiction are hired and paid to work. To promote drug abstinence or adherence to addiction medications, participants are required to provide drug-free urine samples or take prescribed addiction medications, respectively, to gain access to the workplace and/or to maintain their maximum rate of pay. Research has shown that the Therapeutic Workplace intervention is effective in promoting and maintaining abstinence from heroin, cocaine and alcohol and in promoting adherence to naltrexone...
June 2016: Translational Issues in Psychological Science
Nicholas Weida, Lcdr Dinchen Jardine, Benjamin Kennedy, Amy Beane, Timothy Daskivich
BACKGROUND : Resident attitudes toward the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) likely influence the ACGME's effectiveness in its role of ensuring compliance with its requirements. Beyond perceptions of duty hour limits and their enforcement, there is a lack of data on resident perceptions of the ACGME and its role. OBJECTIVE : We explored resident attitudes toward the ACGME and developed recommendations for improved outreach to the resident community to improve perceptions...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
DeWitt C Baldwin, Steven R Daugherty
Relatively little is known about how, from whom, and under what conditions residents say they most effectively learn. We examined the relationships between residents' self-reported ratings of 11 different sources of learning and a number of empirical variables, using a national, random sample of postgraduate year (PGY) 1 and PGY-2 residents in the 1998-1999 training year. Residents were surveyed by mail. Completed surveys were received from 64.2% of 5616 residents contacted. The most often reported sources of learning were other residents and attending physicians...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Mary Ellen J Goldhamer, Keith Baker, Amy P Cohen, Debra F Weinstein
BACKGROUND: Multi-source evaluation has demonstrated value for trainees, but is not generally provided to residency or fellowship program directors (PDs). OBJECTIVE: To develop, implement, and evaluate a PD multi-source evaluation process. METHODS: Tools were developed for PD evaluation by trainees, department chairs, and graduate medical education (GME) leadership. Evaluation questions were based on PD responsibilities, including Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Amber R Atwater, Mariah Rudd, Audrey Brown, John S Wiener, Robert Benjamin, W Robert Lee, Jullia A Rosdahl
BACKGROUND : There is limited information on the impact of widespread adoption of the electronic health record (EHR) on graduate medical education (GME). OBJECTIVE : To identify areas of consensus by education experts, where the use of EHR impacts GME, with the goal of developing strategies and tools to enhance GME teaching and learning in the EHR environment. METHODS : Information was solicited from experienced US physician educators who use EPIC EHR following 3 steps: 2 rounds of online surveys using the Delphi technique, followed by telephone interviews...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Francis L Counselman, Terry Kowalenko, Catherine A Marco, Kevin B Joldersma, Robert C Korte, Earl J Reisdorff
BACKGROUND : In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instituted requirements that limited the number of hours residents could spend on duty, and in 2011, it revised these requirements. OBJECTIVE : This study explored whether the implementation of the 2003 and 2011 duty hour limits was associated with a change in emergency medicine residents' performance on the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) Qualifying Examination (QE)...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Richard A Feinberg, Amanda L Clauser
BACKGROUND : In graduate medical education, assessment results can effectively guide professional development when both assessment and feedback support a formative model. When individuals cannot directly access the test questions and responses, a way of using assessment results formatively is to provide item keyword feedback. OBJECTIVE : The purpose of the following study was to investigate whether exposure to item keyword feedback aids in learner remediation...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Tracy J Koehler, Jaclyn Goodfellow, Alan T Davis, John E vanSchagen, Lori Schuh
BACKGROUND : In a time of threats to the funding for graduate medical education (GME) and projected physician shortages, drawing attention to the value of physician training programs may be useful. One approach is to study the number and percentage of physicians who enter practice in the state in which they trained. OBJECTIVE : We sought to examine the percentage of graduates from a single Michigan-based GME institution over a 15-year period, who practiced medicine in Michigan during their career...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Rachel Stork Poeppelman, Cara A Liebert, Daniel Brandt Vegas, Carl A Germann, Anna Volerman
BACKGROUND : Team-based learning (TBL) promotes problem solving and teamwork, and has been applied as an instructional method in undergraduate medical education with purported benefits. Although TBL curricula have been implemented for residents, no published systematic reviews or guidelines exist for the development and use of TBL in graduate medical education (GME). OBJECTIVE : To review TBL curricula in GME, identify gaps in the literature, and synthesize a framework to guide the development of TBL curricula at the GME level...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Gail M Sullivan
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
Awadh Kishor Pandit, Deepti Vibha, Achal Kumar Srivastava, Garima Shukla, Vinay Goyal, Madhuri Behari
Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM; bǔ chōng yǔ tì dài yī xué) in Parkinson disease (PD) ranged 40-70%. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, types and factors associated with the use of CAM in Indian PD patients. PD patients, fulfilling UKPD-Society brain-bank diagnostic-criteria, attending Movement-disorders clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in India from 1st May to 15th December 2012 were enrolled. Information on socio-demographic, clinical data and treatment along with factors (source of information, benefits, harms, reason for use and cost) associated with CAM use were recorded...
October 2016: Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine
Stefanie Mache, Lisa Baresi, Monika Bernburg, Karin Vitzthum, David Groneberg
BACKGROUND: Dealing with work-related stress is highly prevalent for employees in Gynecology Medicine. Junior physicians, in particular, have to face high working demands and challenges while starting their medical career after graduation. Job resources (i.e., social support) and personal resources (coping skills) might reduce job strain. The evidence for supportive and effective mental health interventions for clinicians is limited. Offering psychosocial skill training for entrants in Gynecology Medicine is expected to be highly beneficial...
October 22, 2016: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Ronald M Rapee, Michael P Jones, Jennifer L Hudson, Gin S Malhi, Heidi J Lyneham, Sophie C Schneider
Use of the partial NMDA receptor agonist d-Cycloserine (DCS) to increase extinction to feared cues among anxious adults has shown mixed, although overall positive effects. Few studies have extended this effect to youth and none have addressed young people with broad-based anxiety such as separation anxiety, social anxiety, or generalised anxiety. In the current trial 51 children and adolescents with diagnosed anxiety disorders, aged 7-14 years received four sessions of graduated, experimenter-led, in vivo exposure to a hierarchy of feared cues relevant to their primary fear...
October 18, 2016: Behaviour Research and Therapy
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