Read by QxMD icon Read

Community based research

Justin T Clapp, Jody A Roberts, Britt Dahlberg, Lee Sullivan Berry, Lisa M Jacobs, Edward A Emmett, Frances K Barg
Research on community responses to environmental toxicity has richly described the struggles of citizens to identify unrecognized toxins, collect their own environmental health facts, and use them to lobby authorities for recognition and remediation. Much of this literature is based on an empiricist premise: it is concerned with exploring differences in how laypeople and experts perceive what is presumed to be a singular toxic reality that preexists these varying perspectives. Here, we seek to reexamine this topic by shifting the focus from facts to facticity-that is, by exploring the many types of knowledge that communities develop about toxicity and how these knowledges articulate with the ideas of scientific and governmental authorities about what kinds of information are valid bases for policymaking...
October 20, 2016: Social Science & Medicine
Joanna P MacEwan, Felicia M Forma, Jason Shafrin, Ainslie Hatch, Darius N Lakdawalla, Jean-Pierre Lindenmayer
BACKGROUND: Poor medication adherence contributes to negative treatment response, symptom relapse, and hospitalizations in schizophrenia. Many health plans use claims-based measures like medication possession ratios or proportion of days covered (PDC) to measure patient adherence to antipsychotics. Classifying patients solely on the basis of a single average PDC measure, however, may mask clinically meaningful variations over time in how patients arrive at an average PDC level. OBJECTIVE: To model patterns of medication adherence evolving over time for patients with schizophrenia who initiated treatment with an oral atypical antipsychotic and, based on these patterns, to identify groups of patients with different adherence behaviors...
November 2016: Journal of Managed Care & Specialty Pharmacy
Feng Q He, Markus Ollert
Identification of key genes for a given physiological or pathological process is an essential but still very challenging task for the entire biomedical research community. Statistics-based approaches, such as genome-wide association study (GWAS)- or quantitative trait locus (QTL)-related analysis have already made enormous contributions to identifying key genes associated with a given disease or phenotype, the success of which is however very much dependent on a huge number of samples. Recent advances in network biology, especially network inference directly from genome-scale data and the following-up network analysis, opens up new avenues to predict key genes driving a given biological process or cellular function...
October 26, 2016: Advances in Biochemical Engineering/biotechnology
Hanns Lochmüller, Yann Le Cam, Anneliene H Jonker, Lilian Pl Lau, Gareth Baynam, Petra Kaufmann, Paul Lasko, Hugh Js Dawkins, Christopher P Austin, Kym M Boycott
The International Rare Diseases Research Consortium (IRDiRC) has created a quality label, 'IRDiRC Recognized Resources', formerly known as 'IRDiRC Recommended'. It is a peer-reviewed quality indicator process established based on the IRDiRC Policies and Guidelines to designate resources (ie, standards, guidelines, tools, and platforms) designed to accelerate the pace of discoveries and translation into clinical applications for the rare disease (RD) research community. In its first year of implementation, 13 resources successfully applied for this designation, each focused on key areas essential to IRDiRC objectives and to the field of RD research more broadly...
October 26, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
Celia Taber, Jim Warren, Karen Day
The clinical research industry has yet to fully embrace information technology (IT) for informed consent purposes, even though it is used indispensably in our everyday lives and in other areas of clinical research and healthcare. This paper presents findings of a meta-narrative literature review to discuss the potential for IT to improve the quality of clinical research informed consent. The review reveals three main rationales for including IT in research consent. First, in the current context consent documents frequently fail to be effective decision aids for patients, and the lack of patient centricity in the process...
2016: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics
Paul McKenna, Brent Thoma, Ken Milne, Chris Bond
As part of the Canadian Journal of Emergency Medicine's (CJEM) developing social media strategy, 1 we are collaborating with the Skeptics' Guide to Emergency Medicine (SGEM) to summarize and critically appraise the current emergency medicine (EM) literature using evidence-based medicine principles. In the "Hot Off the Press" series, we select original research manuscripts published in CJEM to be featured on the SGEM website/podcast 2 and discussed by the study authors and the online EM community. A similar collaboration is underway between the SGEM and Academic Emergency Medicine...
October 26, 2016: CJEM
Per Sebastian Skardal, Alex Arenas
The control of network-coupled nonlinear dynamical systems is an active area of research in the nonlinear science community. Coupled oscillator networks represent a particularly important family of nonlinear systems, with applications ranging from the power grid to cardiac excitation. Here, we study the control of network-coupled limit cycle oscillators, extending the previous work that focused on phase oscillators. Based on stabilizing a target fixed point, our method aims to attain complete frequency synchronization, i...
September 2016: Chaos
Kerry McBroom
One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities...
June 2016: Health and Human Rights
Ruth Elwood Martin, Renee Turner, Larry Howett, Terry Howard, Debra Hanberg, Jane A Buxton, Veronika Moravan, John L Oliffe
OBJECTIVES: The intervention objectives were to evaluate and describe the feasibility of using a community-based research (CBR) approach to adapt and implement HIV-prevention materials and tools with incarcerated men. We found no prior published reports about CBR HIV-prevention education in Canadian correctional facilities. METHODS: Twelve members of the correctional Peer Education Committee (PEC) and Aboriginal PEC, whom a correctional nurse identified as being interested in preventive health, were purposively invited to participate...
October 25, 2016: Global Health Promotion
Alexandra B Collins, Carol Strike, Adrian Guta, Rosalind Baltzer Turje, Patrick McDougall, Surita Parashar, Ryan McNeil
BACKGROUND: Compensation for participating in research has been a fundamental element of the research apparatus despite concerns about its impact on incentivising participation. Researchers and research ethics boards acknowledge that compensation may prompt structurally vulnerable populations, such as people who use drugs (PWUD), to engage in research primarily out of financial need. Thus, institutional restrictions around compensation have been implemented. This study explores the ethical implications of compensation practices aimed at 'protecting' structurally vulnerable people living with HIV (PLHIV) who use drugs within the context of individuals' lived realities...
October 22, 2016: International Journal on Drug Policy
Lori L Jervis, William Sconzert-Hall
The problem of how to conceptualize elder mistreatment goes back several decades, and is especially important for ethnic minority populations, who may have perspectives that differ from the dominant society. This Community Based Participatory Research study, which examined perceptions of mistreatment by family among 100 urban and rural older American Indians, permits a rare glimpse into how Native elders themselves understand this issue. Here, good treatment was conceptualized in terms of being taken care of, having one's needs met, and being respected...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect
Lauren J Parker, Haslyn Hunte, Anita Ohmit, Debra Furr-Holden, Roland J Thorpe
: Previous research has demonstrated that experiencing interpersonal discrimination is associated with cigarette smoking. Few studies have examined the relationship between the effects of physical and emotional discrimination and cigarette usage, and none have examined this relationship among Black men. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the effects of physical and emotional discrimination and cigarette smoking. METHODS: Data from the Indiana Black Men's Health Study, a community-based sample of adult Black men, was used to conduct multivariate logistic regression to examine the relationship between the physical and emotional effects of discrimination and smoking, net of healthcare and workplace discrimination, age, education, household income, and being married...
October 25, 2016: Substance Use & Misuse
Margaret Mealings, Jacinta Douglas, John Olver
PURPOSE: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) have a key role in supporting educational participation for secondary and tertiary students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This article aims to (i) explore issues identified by students with TBI that affect educational participation beyond their academic performance, (ii) offer a framework based on research evidence to guide the practice of SLPs and (iii) explore strategies that may expand the traditional roles of SLPs to support students beyond academic performance...
October 25, 2016: International Journal of Speech-language Pathology
Laura E Edgington-Mitchell, Matthew Bogyo, Martijn Verdoes
Since protease activity is highly regulated by structural and environmental influences, the abundance of a protease often does not directly correlate with its activity. Because in most of the cases it is the activity of a protease that gives rise to its biological relevance, tools to report on this activity are of great value to the research community. Activity-based probes (ABPs) are small molecule tools that allow for the monitoring and profiling of protease activities in complex biological systems. The class of fluorescent quenched ABPs (qABPs), being intrinsically "dark" and only emitting fluorescence after reaction with the target protease, are ideally suited for imaging techniques such as small animal noninvasive fluorescence imaging and live cell fluorescence microscopy...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Fary Khan, Bhasker Amatya, Mary P Galea, Roman Gonzenbach, Jürg Kesselring
The prevalence of disability due to neurological conditions is escalating worldwide. Neurological disorders have significant disability-burden with long-term functional and psychosocial issues, requiring specialized rehabilitation services for comprehensive management, especially treatments tapping into brain recovery 'neuroplastic' processes. Neurorehabilitation is interdisciplinary and cross-sectorial, requiring coordinated effort of diverse sectors, professions, patients and community to manage complex condition-related disability...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neurology
Kenneth Silverman, August F Holtyn, Reed Morrison
Research on a model Therapeutic Workplace has allowed for evaluation of the use of employment in the treatment of drug addiction. Under the Therapeutic Workplace intervention, adults with histories of drug addiction are hired and paid to work. To promote drug abstinence or adherence to addiction medications, participants are required to provide drug-free urine samples or take prescribed addiction medications, respectively, to gain access to the workplace and/or to maintain their maximum rate of pay. Research has shown that the Therapeutic Workplace intervention is effective in promoting and maintaining abstinence from heroin, cocaine and alcohol and in promoting adherence to naltrexone...
June 2016: Translational Issues in Psychological Science
Reza Taherkhani, Fatemeh Farshadpour
From an epidemiological point of view, hepatitis E is an old infection in Iran, but only recently has its importance as a public health concern been considered from research and public health standpoints. As such, there is still a long road ahead to clarify the real burden of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in Iran. According to the available epidemiological studies, the seroprevalence of HEV infection among pregnant women is between 3.6% and 7.4%, and among Iranian children is between 0.9% to 8.5%, varying by geographic regions within the country and directly dependent upon the sanitary status of each...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Clinical and Translational Hepatology
Marvin S Swartz, Sayanti Bhattacharya, Allison G Robertson, Jeffrey W Swanson
OBJECTIVE: Involuntary outpatient commitment (OPC)-also referred to as 'assisted outpatient treatment' or 'community treatment orders'-are civil court orders whereby persons with serious mental illness and repeated hospitalisations are ordered to adhere to community-based treatment. Increasingly, in the United States, OPC is promoted to policy makers as a means to prevent violence committed by persons with mental illness. This article reviews the background and context for promotion of OPC for violence prevention and the empirical evidence for the use of OPC for this goal...
October 24, 2016: Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. Revue Canadienne de Psychiatrie
Annie Y Lam, Juliet K Nguyen, Jason J Parks, Donald E Morisky, Donna L Berry, Seth E Wolpin
OBJECTIVES: To test the effect of "Talking Pill Bottles" on medication self-efficacy, knowledge, adherence, and blood pressure readings among hypertensive patients with low health literacy and to assess patients' acceptance of this innovation. DESIGN: Longitudinal nonblinded randomized trial with standard treatment and intervention arms. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Two community pharmacies serving an ethnically diverse population in the Pacific Northwest...
October 21, 2016: Journal of the American Pharmacists Association: JAPhA
Karlyn A Edwards, Kevin A Alschuler, Dawn M Ehde, Samuel L Battalio, Mark P Jensen
OBJECTIVE: To (1) determine if resilience exhibits similar stability across time as depression, fatigue, and sleep quality, and (2) determine if changes in resilience over a period of one year are associated with changes in depression, fatigue, sleep quality and physical function over this same time period. DESIGN: Observational longitudinal survey study with measures administered two times, one year apart. SETTING: A community-based population sample...
October 21, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"