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Subcortical white matter changes in the brain

Menuka Pallebage-Gamarallage, Sean Foxley, Ricarda A L Menke, Istvan N Huszar, Mark Jenkinson, Benjamin C Tendler, Chaoyue Wang, Saad Jbabdi, Martin R Turner, Karla L Miller, Olaf Ansorge
BACKGROUND: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a clinically and histopathologically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder, in which therapy is hindered by the rapid progression of disease and lack of biomarkers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated its potential for detecting the pathological signature and tracking disease progression in ALS. However, the microstructural and molecular pathological substrate is poorly understood and generally defined histologically...
March 13, 2018: BMC Neuroscience
Erik Barry Erhardt, John C Pesko, Jillian Prestopnik, Jeffrey Thompson, Arvind Caprihan, Gary A Rosenberg
Binswanger's disease is a form of subcortical ischemic vascular disease (SIVD-BD) with extensive white matter changes. To test the hypothesis that biomarkers could improve classification of SIVD-BD, we recruited 62 vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) patients. Multimodal biomarkers were collected at entry into the study based on clinical and neuropsychological testing, multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. The patients' diagnoses were confirmed by long-term follow-up, and they formed a "training set" to test classification methods, including (1) subcortical ischemic vascular disease score (SIVDS), (2) exploratory factor analysis (EFA), (3) logistic regression (LR), and (4) random forest (RF)...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
Fei-Fei Zhang, Wei Peng, John A Sweeney, Zhi-Yun Jia, Qi-Yong Gong
Depression is the leading cause of disability around the world, but little is known about its pathology. Currently, the diagnosis of depression is made based on clinical manifestations, with little objective evidence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used to investigate the pathological changes in brain anatomy associated with this disorder. MRI can identify structural alterations in depressive patients in vivo, which could make considerable contributions to clinical diagnosis and treatment. Numerous studies that focused on gray and white matter have found significant brain region alterations in major depressive disorder patients, such as in the frontal lobe, hippocampus, temporal lobe, thalamus, striatum, and amygdala...
March 5, 2018: CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics
Charlotte Gary, Anne-Sophie Hérard, Zoé Hanss, Marc Dhenain
Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in the brain is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. There is increasing interest in measuring levels of plasma Aβ since this could help in diagnosis of brain pathology. However, the value of plasma Aβ in such a diagnosis is still controversial and factors modulating its levels are still poorly understood. The mouse lemur ( Microcebus murinus ) is a primate model of cerebral aging which can also present with amyloid plaques and whose Aβ is highly homologous to humans'...
2018: Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Yang Liu, Yan-Hong Dong, Pei-Yuan Lyu, Wei-Hong Chen, Rui Li
Objective: Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia are responsible for more than 80% of dementia cases. These two conditions share common risk factors including hypertension. Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is strongly associated with both hypertension and cognitive impairment. In this review, we identify the pathophysiological changes in CSVD that are caused by hypertension and further explore the relationship between CSVD and cognitive impairment. Data Sources: We searched and scanned the PubMed database for recently published literatures up to December 2017...
March 5, 2018: Chinese Medical Journal
Bryce Tan, Narayanaswamy Venketasubramanian, Henri Vrooman, Ching-Yu Cheng, Tien Yin Wong, Mohammad Kamran Ikram, Christopher Chen, Saima Hilal
BACKGROUND: Plasma homocysteine levels are increasingly studied as a potential risk factor for dementia. Elevated homocysteine levels have been linked with gray and white matter volume reduction among individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. However, the effects of homocysteine on brain changes in preclinical stages of dementia remain unexplored. OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of elevated homocysteine levels with markers of neurodegeneration, i...
2018: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease: JAD
Caroline Bund, Benoît Lhermitte, Jérôme De Seze, Stéphane Kremer, Izzie-Jacques Namer
A 64-year-old man was admitted for expressive aphasia with lack of words. He had been diagnosed with Waldenström 4 years before. At that time, he received 6 cycles of single-agent fludarabine, and remission was obtained. Because of acute expressive aphasia, he underwent brain MRI, which showed frontoparietal and insular subcortical gadolinium enhancement; Bing-Neel syndrome was suspected. Fronto-temporo-insular hypometabolism and left parietal hypometabolism were highlighted on FDG PET/CT. Structural and functional brain imaging revealed impairment of brain areas due to white matter changes and reinforced the diagnosis...
February 21, 2018: Clinical Nuclear Medicine
Basilis Zikopoulos, Miguel Ángel García-Cabezas, Helen Barbas
Noninvasive imaging and tractography methods have yielded information on broad communication networks but lack resolution to delineate intralaminar cortical and subcortical pathways in humans. An important unanswered question is whether we can use the wealth of precise information on pathways from monkeys to understand connections in humans. We addressed this question within a theoretical framework of systematic cortical variation and used identical high-resolution methods to compare the architecture of cortical gray matter and the white matter beneath, which gives rise to short- and long-distance pathways in humans and rhesus monkeys...
February 5, 2018: PLoS Biology
Austin T Mudd, Joanne E Fil, Laura C Knight, Fan Lam, Zhi-Pei Liang, Ryan N Dilger
Early-life iron deficiency has lifelong influences on brain structure and cognitive function, however characterization of these changes often requires invasive techniques. There is a need for non-invasive assessment of early-life iron deficiency with potential to translate findings to the human clinical setting. In this study, 28 male pigs were provided either a control diet (CONT; n = 14; 23.5 mg Fe/L milk replacer) or an iron-deficient diet (ID; n = 14; 1.56 mg Fe/L milk replacer) for phase 1 of the study, from postnatal day (PND) 2 until 32...
January 27, 2018: Nutrients
Eric E Smith, Alona Muzikansky, Cheryl R McCreary, Saima Batool, Anand Viswanathan, Bradford C Dickerson, Keith Johnson, Steven M Greenberg, Deborah Blacker
BACKGROUND: Hypertension is the strongest modifiable risk factor for subcortical ischemic changes and is also a risk factor for Alzheimer's dementia. We used neuroimaging to investigate the pathological basis of early cognitive symptoms in patients with hypertension. METHODS: In this cross-sectional cohort study 67 patients age >60 years with hypertension and Clinical Dementia Rating scale score of 0.5 without dementia, and without history of symptomatic stroke, underwent MRI for measurement of subcortical vascular changes and positron emission tomography (PET) scan with Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB-PET) to detect beta-amyloid deposition...
2018: PloS One
Benoit C Mouzon, Corbin Bachmeier, Joseph O Ojo, Christopher M Acker, Scott Ferguson, Daniel Paris, Ghania Ait-Ghezala, Gogce Crynen, Peter Davies, Michael Mullan, William Stewart, Fiona Crawford
Objective: Exposure to repetitive concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), has been linked with increased risk of long-term neurodegenerative changes, specifically chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). To date, preclinical studies largely have focused on the immediate aftermath of mTBI, with no literature on the lifelong consequences of mTBI in these models. This study provides the first account of lifelong neurobehavioral and histological consequences of repetitive mTBI providing unique insight into the constellation of evolving and ongoing pathologies with late survival...
January 2018: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
Eileanoir B Johnson, Lauren M Byrne, Sarah Gregory, Filipe B Rodrigues, Kaj Blennow, Alexandra Durr, Blair R Leavitt, Raymund A Roos, Henrik Zetterberg, Sarah J Tabrizi, Rachael I Scahill, Edward J Wild
OBJECTIVE: Neurofilament light (NfL) protein in blood plasma has been proposed as a prognostic biomarker of neurodegeneration in a number of conditions, including Huntington disease (HD). This study investigates the regional distribution of NfL-associated neural pathology in HD gene expansion carriers. METHODS: We examined associations between NfL measured in plasma and regionally specific atrophy in cross-sectional (n = 198) and longitudinal (n = 177) data in HD gene expansion carriers from the international multisite TRACK-HD study...
January 24, 2018: Neurology
Maurizio Corbetta, Joshua S Siegel, Gordon L Shulman
Traditional neuropsychological approaches emphasize the specificity of behavioral deficits and the modular organization of the brain. At the population level, however, there is emerging evidence that deficits are correlated resulting in a low dimensional structure of post-stroke neurological impairments. Here we consider the implications of low dimensionality for the three-way mapping between structural damage, altered physiology, and behavioral deficits. Understanding this mapping will be aided by large-sample studies that apply multivariate models and focus on explained percentage of variance, as opposed to univariate lesion-symptom techniques that report statistical significance...
January 2, 2018: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Cecylia Rajczewska-Oleszkiewicz, Agnieszka Cyganek, Anna Stadnik, Dorota Dziewulska
We describe an 86-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who presented sudden disturbances of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed diffused hyperintensive changes on T2-weighted images localized subcortically in the white matter of both cerebral hemispheres, corresponding to acute vasogenic edema, causing moderate mass effect. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was initially diagnosed. After implementation of anti-edema intravenous steroid treatment and hypotensive therapy the symptoms began to retire, till the total regression...
January 6, 2018: Neurologia i Neurochirurgia Polska
Hyeonseok S Jeong, Sang-Rae Lee, Jieun E Kim, In Kyoon Lyoo, Sujung Yoon, Eun Namgung, Kyu-Tae Chang, Bom Sahn Kim, Sejung Yang, Jooyeon J Im, Saerom Jeon, Ilhyang Kang, Jiyoung Ma, Yong-An Chung, Soo Mee Lim
In animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is one of the most widely used agents that damages the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. However, brain structural changes in response to MPTP remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate in vivo longitudinal changes in gray matter (GM) volume and white matter (WM) microstructure in primate models administered with MPTP. In six cynomolgus monkeys, high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans were acquired 7 times over 32 weeks, and assessments of motor symptoms were conducted over 15 months, before and after the MPTP injection...
2018: PloS One
Douglas C Dean, E M Planalp, W Wooten, C K Schmidt, S R Kecskemeti, C Frye, N L Schmidt, H H Goldsmith, A L Alexander, R J Davidson
The developing brain undergoes systematic changes that occur at successive stages of maturation. Deviations from the typical neurodevelopmental trajectory are hypothesized to underlie many early childhood disorders; thus, characterizing the earliest patterns of normative brain development is essential. Recent neuroimaging research provides insight into brain structure during late childhood and adolescence; however, few studies have examined the infant brain, particularly in infants under 3 months of age. Using high-resolution structural MRI, we measured subcortical gray and white matter brain volumes in a cohort (N = 143) of 1-month infants and examined characteristics of these volumetric measures throughout this early period of neurodevelopment...
January 5, 2018: Brain Structure & Function
Raj N Kalaria
Vascular dementia (VaD) is widely recognised as the second most common type of dementia. Consensus and accurate diagnosis of clinically suspected VaD relies on wide-ranging clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging measures in life but more importantly pathological confirmation. Factors defining subtypes of VaD include the nature and extent of vascular pathologies, degree of involvement of extra and intracranial vessels and the anatomical location of tissue changes as well as time after the initial vascular event...
December 19, 2017: Neuropharmacology
Erkan Gökçe
Multinodular and vacuolating neuronal tumors (MVNT) are low grade neuronal tumors classified in cerebral tumors based on 2016 WHO central nerve system classification. Previously, MVNTs were probably tumors incidentally determined by imaging methods, but they could not be diagnosed or they were misdiagnosed. Two cases are reported in the present study, for which radiological imaging was carried out for epilepsy in one and for headache in the other. The first case was a twenty seven years old female patient with headache complaint...
December 14, 2017: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Julie Ottoy, Jeroen Verhaeghe, Ellis Niemantsverdriet, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Sigrid Stroobants, Steven Staelens
BACKGROUND: Increased brain uptake on [18F]AV45 PET is a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The standardised uptake value ratio (SUVR) is widely used for quantification but is subject to variability. Here we evaluate how SUVR of a cortical target region is affected by blood flow changes in the target and two frequently used reference regions. METHODS: Regional baseline time-activity curves (TACs) were simulated based on metabolite-corrected plasma input functions and pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from our previously acquired data in healthy control (HC; n = 10), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI; n = 15) and AD cohorts (n = 9)...
2017: PloS One
Nina F Dronkers, Maria V Ivanova, Juliana V Baldo
Studies of language disorders have shaped our understanding of brain-language relationships over the last two centuries. This article provides a review of this research and how our thinking has changed over the years regarding how the brain processes language. In the 19th century, a series of famous case studies linked distinct speech and language functions to specific portions of the left hemisphere of the brain, regions that later came to be known as Broca's and Wernicke's areas. One hundred years later, the emergence of new brain imaging tools allowed for the visualization of brain injuries in vivo that ushered in a new era of brain-behavior research and greatly expanded our understanding of the neural processes of language...
October 2017: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society: JINS
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