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oral direct thrombin inhibitors

Clemens Feistritzer, Stefan Schmidt
During the 57(th) annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology 2015 in Orlando, Florida, various aspects in the field of hemostaseology were presented. The Choosing Wisely® campaign pointed out the importance of the critical use of diagnostic tools to rule out pulmonary embolism and questioned the relevance of thrombophilia testing in women undergoing routine infertility evaluation. Furthermore, the approval of idarucizumab, a specific antidote for the reversal of the anticoagulant effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, was highlighted...
2016: Memo
Ryan Hakimi, Ankur Garg
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. RECENT FINDINGS: The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Jamshed J Dalal, Anil Dhall, Abhay Bhave
Oral vitamin K antagonists (VKA) such as warfarin have been the mainstay of therapy for stroke prevention in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) while low-molecular-weight heparin, fondaparinux and adjusted-dose warfarin or aspirin have been routinely used for thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients undergoing total hip or knee replacement. However, VKAs are associated with considerable limitations, including increased risk of bleeding and narrow therapeutic window. Novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs, now referred as Non Vit K dependent oral anticoagulants), including the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and direct Factor Xa inhibitors such as rivaroxaban and apixaban are now approved alternatives to warfarin for prophylaxis of stroke and systemic embolic events (SEE) in patients with NVAF and treatment and prophylaxis of VTE...
April 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Jessica W Skelley, C Whitney White, Angela R Thomason
To review the use of the direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) agents in inherited thrombophilia based on the literature. MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Google Scholar searches (1970-May 2016) were conducted for case reports, case series, retrospective cohorts, or clinical trials using the key words: protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, antithrombin deficiency, activated protein C resistance, Factor V Leiden, hypercoagulable, NOACs, dabigatran, apixaban, rivaroxaban, betrixaban, edoxaban, Xa inhibitor, direct thrombin inhibitor...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
Jean Amiral, Claire Dunois, Cédric Amiral, Jerard Seghatchian
In the past decade Direct Oral Anti-Coagulants (DOACs), targeting Thrombin or Factor Xa, have enormously facilitated the daily treatment of all relevant patients, including those requiring lifelong therapy. These DOACs have considerable advantages over the use of oral Vitamin K Antagonist (VKA) treatments, in view of having little interferences with food and other medications and also not requiring adjustment for age, gender or weight, with some well-defined exceptions. In this current What's Happening Section we focus on measurements of DiXaIs in plasma using anti-Xa assays, with the objective of providing a tribute to Professor Michel Meyer Samama, who was not only a real leader in this field but, in the past, both authors benefited from his wisdom, as a teacher who dedicated his scientific and professional life (among many other interests in hemostasis, thrombosis and fibrinolysis) to develop and promote methods and strategies for laboratory monitoring of anticoagulants...
October 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Karen S Brown, Hamim Zahir, Michael A Grosso, Hans J Lanz, Michele F Mercuri, Jerrold H Levy
BACKGROUND: Four nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are approved for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These include the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bleeding is a complication for all anticoagulants and concerns regarding bleeding risk and the suitability of effective reversal strategies may be a barrier to their prescription...
September 23, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Marc Maegele, Oliver Grottke, Herbert Schöchl, Oliver A Sakowitz, Michael Spannagl, Jürgen Koscielny
BACKGROUND: Direct (non-vitamin-K-dependent) oral anticoagulants (DOAC) are given as an alternative to vitamin K antagonists (VKA) to prevent stroke and embolic disease in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not due to pathology of the heart valves. Fatal hemorrhage is rarer when DOACs are given (nonvalvular atrial fibrillation: odds ratio [OR] 0.68; 95% confidence interval [95% CI: 0.48; 0.96], and venous thromboembolism: OR 0.54; [0.22; 1.32]). 48% of emergency trauma patients need an emergency operation or early surgery...
September 5, 2016: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
Céline Jumeau, Alain Rupin, Pauline Chieng-Yane, Nathalie Mougenot, Noël Zahr, Monique David-Dufilho, Stéphane N Hatem
The present study tested the hypothesis that thrombin participates in formation of left atrial remodeling and that direct oral anticoagulants, such as direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs), can prevent its progression. In a rat model of heart failure associated with left atrial dilation, we found that chronic treatment with DTIs reduces the atrial remodeling and the duration of atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes induced by burst pacing by inhibiting myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis. In addition to the prevention of thromboembolism complicating AF, DTIs may be of interest to slow down the progression of the arrhythmogenic substrate...
August 2016: JACC. Basic to Translational Science
Bethany T Samuelson, Adam Cuker, Deborah M Siegal, Mark Crowther, David A Garcia
BACKGROUND: The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are the treatment of choice for most patients with atrial fibrillation and/or non-cancer associated venous thromboembolic disease. While routine monitoring of these agents is not required, assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable in special situations. The objective of this study was to systematically review and summarize current evidence regarding laboratory assessment of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban...
September 13, 2016: Chest
N G Khorev, A P Momot, V O Kon'kova
During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation)...
2016: Angiologii︠a︡ i Sosudistai︠a︡ Khirurgii︠a︡, Angiology and Vascular Surgery
Bethany T Samuelson, Adam Cuker
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer noninferior efficacy and improved safety compared to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike VKAs, DOACs do not require routine laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effect and dose adjustment. In certain situations, however, laboratory assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable. Here we review the utility of currently available assays for assessment of DOAC effect and recommend an optimal assessment strategy for each drug, including calibrated dilute thrombin time or ecarin-based assays for dabigatran and calibrated anti-Xa activity assays for the factor Xa inhibitors...
September 2, 2016: Blood Reviews
Walter Ageno, Alexander G G Turpie
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising both deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a serious and common cardiovascular disease associated with the risk of chronic complications, recurrent VTE events and even death. The treatment landscape has, in recent years, seen a paradigm shift from the use of traditional anticoagulants (low-molecular-weight heparin [LMWH] overlapping with and followed by a vitamin K antagonist [VKA]) to non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This class of agents, encompassing direct factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors have shown non-inferior efficacy and better safety to standard of care in randomised controlled trials (RCTs)...
September 14, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Reece A Davies, Nisal K Perera, Yishay Orr
A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'In patients requiring an implanted cardiac rhythm device, do novel oral anticoagulant agents lead to increased rates of peri-procedural complications?' Altogether 1228 papers were found using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated...
September 5, 2016: Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Massimo Franchini, Pier Mannuccio Mannucci
Venous thromboembolism (VTE), consisting of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a major clinical concern associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of management of VTE is anticoagulation, and traditional anticoagulants include parenteral heparins and oral vitamin K antagonists. Recently, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed and licensed, including direct factor Xa inhibitors (e.g. rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and thrombin inhibitors (e.g. dabigatran etexilate)...
September 2016: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
Marcel Levi
BACKGROUND: Recently, a new generation of direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) with a greater specificity towards activated coagulation factors was introduced based on encouraging results for efficacy and safety in clinical studies. An initial limitation of these new drugs was the absence of an adequate strategy to reverse the effect if a bleeding event occurs or an urgent invasive procedure has to be carried out. MAIN TEXT: Specific reversing agents for DOACs have become available, however, and are now evaluated in clinical studies...
August 20, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
Waqas Qureshi, Zeeshan Ali, Waseem Amjad, Zaid Alirhayim, Hina Farooq, Shayan Qadir, Fatima Khalid, Mouaz H Al-Mallah
Cancer patients are at major risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), resulting in increased morbidity and economic burden. While a number of theories try to explain its pathophysiology, its risk stratification can be broadly done in cancer-related, treatment-related, and patient-related factors. Studies report the prophylactic use of thrombolytic agents to be safe and effective in decreasing VTE-related mortality/morbidity especially in postoperative cancer patients. Recent data also suggest the prophylactic use of low molecular weight Heparins (LMWHs) and Warfarin to be effective in reducing VTEs related to long-term central venous catheter use...
2016: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine
Andrew Wassef, Ken Butcher
BACKGROUND: Four nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are approved for stroke prevention in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF). AIMS: In this review, we assemble available evidence for the best management of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke patients in the context of NOAC use. SUMMARY OF REVIEW: NOACs provide predictable anticoagulation with fixed dosages. The direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and direct factor Xa inhibitors apixaban, edoxaban, and rivaroxaban are all noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of ischemic stroke and systemic embolism and are associated with reduced incidence of intracranial hemorrhage...
October 2016: International Journal of Stroke: Official Journal of the International Stroke Society
Nabil K Thalji, Lacramioara Ivanciu, Robert Davidson, Phyllis A Gimotty, Sriram Krishnaswamy, Rodney M Camire
Direct inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (FXa) or thrombin are promising oral anticoagulants that are becoming widely adopted. The ability to reverse their anticoagulant effects is important when serious bleeding occurs or urgent medical procedures are needed. Here, using experimental mouse models of hemostasis, we show that a variant coagulation factor, FXa(I16L), rapidly restores hemostasis in the presence of the anticoagulant effects of these inhibitors. The ability of FXa(I16L) to reverse the anticoagulant effects of FXa inhibitor depends, at least in part, on the ability of the active site inhibitor to hinder antithrombin-dependent FXa inactivation, paradoxically allowing uninhibited FXa to persist in plasma...
August 2016: Nature Medicine
Walter Ageno, John Eikelboom, Gregory Y H Lip
Oral anticoagulation is the cornerstone of stroke prevention in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) and management of venous thromboembolism (VTE), resulting in a reduction in thrombotic complications and mortality. Benefit of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in such patients has been unambiguously confirmed, but VKA use is complicated by need for regular monitoring of the international normalized ratio and multiple drug and food interactions. Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that can be used with fixed doses, without the need for routine anticoagulation laboratory monitoring and the advantage of few drug or diet interactions...
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Yahiya Y Syed
Idarucizumab (Praxbind(®)), a humanized monoclonal antibody, is a specific reversal agent for the direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, available as its prodrug dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa(®)). Idarucizumab is approved in several countries (including the USA, the EU, Canada and Australia) for use in adult patients on dabigatran when the reversal of its anticoagulant effects is required for emergency surgery/procedures or in the event of life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding. In the ongoing pivotal RE-VERSE AD trial in these populations (n = 90), intravenous idarucizumab 5 g reversed dabigatran-induced prolongation of dilute thrombin time (dTT) and ecarin clotting time (ECT) within minutes...
August 2016: American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs: Drugs, Devices, and Other Interventions
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