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saxagliptin and heart failure

Petar M Seferović, Mark C Petrie, Gerasimos S Filippatos, Stefan D Anker, Giuseppe Rosano, Johann Bauersachs, Walter J Paulus, Michel Komajda, Francesco Cosentino, Rudolf A de Boer, Dimitrios Farmakis, Wolfram Doehner, Ekaterini Lambrinou, Yuri Lopatin, Massimo F Piepoli, Michael J Theodorakis, Henrik Wiggers, John Lekakis, Alexandre Mebazaa, Mamas A Mamas, Carsten Tschöpe, Arno W Hoes, Jelena P Seferović, Jennifer Logue, Theresa McDonagh, Jillian P Riley, Ivan Milinković, Marija Polovina, Dirk J van Veldhuisen, Mitja Lainscak, Aldo P Maggioni, Frank Ruschitzka, John J V McMurray
The coexistence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and heart failure (HF), either with reduced (HFrEF) or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), is frequent (30-40% of patients) and associated with a higher risk of HF hospitalization, all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. The most important causes of HF in T2DM are coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension and a direct detrimental effect of T2DM on the myocardium. T2DM is often unrecognized in HF patients, and vice versa, which emphasizes the importance of an active search for both disorders in the clinical practice...
March 8, 2018: European Journal of Heart Failure
Anne Pernille Ofstad, Dan Atar, Lars Gullestad, Gisle Langslet, Odd Erik Johansen
Diabetes and heart failure (HF) are both global epidemics with tremendous costs on society with increased rates of HF hospitalizations and worsened prognosis when co-existing, making it a significant "deadly duo." The evidence for pharmacological treatment of HF in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) stems typically from either subgroup analyses of patients that were recruited to randomized controlled trials of HF interventions, usually in patients with reduced ejection fraction (EF), or from subgroup analyses of HF patients recruited to cardiovascular (CV) outcome trials (CVOT) of glucose lowering agents involving patients with T2DM...
March 8, 2018: Heart Failure Reviews
André Jacques Scheen
Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4is) are generally considered as glucose-lowering agents with a safe profile in type 2 diabetes. Areas covered: An updated review of recent safety data from randomised controlled trials, observational studies, meta-analyses, pharmacovigilance reports regarding alogliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin, sitagliptin, and vildagliptin, with a special focus on risks of hypoglycemia, pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, major cardiovascular events, hospitalisation for heart failure and other new safety issues, such as bone fractures and arthralgia...
April 2018: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety
Brian A Bergmark, Benjamin M Scirica, Ph Gabriel Steg, Christina L Fanola, Yared Gurmu, Ofri Mosenzon, Avivit Cahn, Itamar Raz, Deepak L Bhatt
Aims: Optimal blood pressure for prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains uncertain and there is concern for increased risk with low diastolic blood pressure (DBP). This study analysed the association between blood pressure and CV outcomes in high-risk patients with T2DM. Methods and results: Patients with T2DM and elevated CV risk were enrolled in the Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in patients with diabetes mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 53 trial...
January 31, 2018: European Heart Journal
Michael R Cobretti, Benjamin Bowman, Ted Grabarczyk, Emily Potter
OBJECTIVES: The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4 inhibitors) are effective modulators of fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In 2013 the Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 53 (SAVOR-TIMI 53) clinical trial found an increased risk of heart failure exacerbation, as a secondary outcome, among patients treated with saxagliptin. This study examines the safety of DPP-4 inhibitors as a class in T2DM in relation to risk of heart failure exacerbations...
January 24, 2018: Pharmacotherapy
Alberto Palazzuoli, Elena Ceccarelli, Gaetano Ruocco, Ranuccio Nuti
Heart failure (HF) is a common complication in patients with type 2 diabetes and it is closely associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. The incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes is related to high levels of glycemia, expressed by increase of HbA1c levels. However, there is little evidence to indicate that glycemic control can reduce the incidence of HF events in this population. Recently, several new antidiabetic drugs have been proposed although the exact clinical impact on heart failure occurrence and deterioration is under debate...
January 23, 2018: Heart Failure Reviews
Wen-Qin Guo, Lang Li, Qiang Su, Wei-Ran Dai, Zi-Liang Ye
BACKGROUND: Previous meta-analyses evaluating the effectiveness of individual dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors on the risk of heart failure (HF) were limited because of the small number of trials with direct comparisons between two treatments. METHODS: A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between DPP-4 inhibitors and the risk of HF in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. The primary outcome was the occurrence of HF or hospital admission for HF...
December 2017: Value in Health: the Journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research
Benjamin M Scirica, Ofri Mosenzon, Deepak L Bhatt, Jacob A Udell, Ph Gabriel Steg, Darren K McGuire, KyungAh Im, Estella Kanevsky, Christina Stahre, Mikaela Sjöstrand, Itamar Raz, Eugene Braunwald
Importance: An elevated level of urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) is a marker of renal dysfunction and predictor of kidney failure/death in patients with type 2 diabetes. The prognostic use of UACR in established cardiac biomarkers is not well described. Objective: To evaluate whether UACR offers incremental prognostic benefit beyond risk factors and established plasma cardiovascular biomarkers. Design, Setting, and Participants: The Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (SAVOR-TIMI) 53 study was performed from May 2010 to May 2013 and evaluated the safety of saxagliptin vs placebo in patients with type 2 diabetes with overt cardiovascular disease or multiple risk factors...
February 1, 2018: JAMA Cardiology
André J Scheen
Saxagliptin (a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, DPP-4i) and dapagliflozin (a sodium-glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitor, SGLT2i) improve glucose control in type 2 diabetes (T2D) through different potentially complementary mechanisms, thus offering the opportunity for a combined therapy. Area covered: The characteristics of the saxagliptin/dapagliflozin combination are analysed, focusing on: 1) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties; 2) efficacy and safety in phase III trials with concurrent and sequential add-on therapy; and 3) potential use in clinical practice, including in special populations (cardiovascular disease, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, elderly)...
December 2017: Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology
Pia S Pollack, Kristina D Chadwick, David M Smith, Martin Billger, Boaz Hirshberg, Nayyar Iqbal, David W Boulton
BACKGROUND: In the Saxagliptin Assessment of Vascular Outcomes Recorded in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus (SAVOR) trial in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) at high risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease, saxagliptin did not increase the risk for major CV adverse events. However, there was an unexpected imbalance in events of hospitalization for heart failure (hHF), one of six components of the secondary CV composite endpoint, with a greater number of events observed with saxagliptin...
September 13, 2017: Cardiovascular Diabetology
Dario Giugliano, Maria Ida Maiorino, Giuseppe Bellastella, Katherine Esposito
In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), more intensive glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes leads to a modest (9%) reduction in major cardiovascular events (MACE), associated with a 20% reduction of kidney events and 13% reduction of eye events. The FDA issued guidance in 2008 led to the conduct of numerous cardiovascular outcomes (CVOT) trials to assess cardiovascular safety of new antihyperglycemic therapies in patients with type 2 diabetes. The results of these trials show that insulin glargine, three different dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors (saxagliptin, alogliptin, and sitagliptin) and lixisenatide (a glucagon like peptide-1 receptor agonist) produce no significant difference in CVOT when compared with usual care or placebo...
September 11, 2017: Endocrine
Chintan N Koyani, Ewald Kolesnik, Gerald Wölkart, Niroj Shrestha, Susanne Scheruebel, Christopher Trummer, Klaus Zorn-Pauly, Astrid Hammer, Petra Lang, Helga Reicher, Heinrich Maechler, Klaus Groschner, Bernd Mayer, Peter P Rainer, Harald Sourij, Wolfgang Sattler, Ernst Malle, Brigitte Pelzmann, Dirk von Lewinski
Saxagliptin treatment has been associated with increased rate of hospitalization for heart failure in type 2 diabetic patients, though the underlying mechanism(s) remain elusive. To address this, we assessed the effects of saxagliptin on human atrial trabeculae, guinea pig hearts and cardiomyocytes. We found that the primary target of saxagliptin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4, is absent in cardiomyocytes, yet saxagliptin internalized into cardiomyocytes and impaired cardiac contractility via inhibition of the Ca2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-phospholamban-sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase 2a axis and Na+ -Ca2+ exchanger function in Ca2+ extrusion...
December 1, 2017: Biochemical Pharmacology
Masayuki Kaneko, Mamoru Narukawa
BACKGROUND: Saxagliptin statistically significantly increased the risk of hospitalization for heart failure compared with placebo in the clinical trial of SAVOR-TIMI 53. Neither the reason why only saxagliptin among several dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors increased the risk, nor the clinical implication of the result has been explained. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of hospitalization for heart failure associated with DPP-4 inhibitors by using an alternative measure to the hazard ratio...
July 2017: Annals of Pharmacotherapy
Ioanna Eleftheriadou, Pinelopi Grigoropoulou, Evangelos Liberopoulos, Stavros Liatis, Alexandros Kokkinos, Nikolaos Tentolouris
It is known that cardiovascular (CV) disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Over the last years one of the most discussed topics is the CV safety of anti-diabetic medications. Regarding CV safety of older anti-diabetic agents the data are less clear and conclusions about their CV safety is based mostly on randomized controlled trials designed to assess their glucose lowering efficacy. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the CV safety of older and newer anti-diabetic medications...
May 29, 2017: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Andrew H Briggs, Deepak L Bhatt, Benjamin M Scirica, Itamar Raz, Karissa M Johnston, Shelagh M Szabo, Klas Bergenheim, Jayanti Mukherjee, Boaz Hirshberg, Ofri Mosenzon
BACKGROUND: The impact of cardiovascular complications on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) in type 2 diabetes mellitus has not been clearly established. Using EQ5D utility data from SAVOR-TIMI 53, a large phase IV trial of saxagliptin versus placebo, we quantified the impact of cardiovascular and other major events on HRQoL. METHODS: EQ5D utilities were recorded annually and following myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke. Utilities among patients experiencing major cardiovascular events were analyzed using linear mixed-effects regression, adjusting for baseline characteristics (including EQ5D utility), and compared to those not experiencing major cardiovascular events...
January 23, 2017: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice
Katharina Laubner, Jochen Seufert
Type 2- diabetes mellitus (T2DM) represents a major risk factor for cardiovascular complications and mortality. Strict glucose control in the early course of the disease prevents cardiovascular complications only in the long run. Non-medical therapies (diet, exercise, body weight reduction) bear little evidence for positive cardiovascular effects.Bariatric surgery is not number one choice in therapy of T2DM. Metformin seems to provide positive cardiovascular effects. Insulin seems to be cardiovascular neutral, as well as the DPP4-inhibitors Saxagliptin, Sitagliptin and Alogliptin...
May 2017: Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
Marlys H LeBras, Arden R Barry, Sheri L Koshman
PURPOSE: The cardiovascular safety outcomes of newer antidiabetic agents were reviewed. SUMMARY: Seven randomized, placebo-controlled trials involving patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with or at risk for cardiovascular disease were reviewed. The trials examined the cardiovascular safety outcomes of the following agents: alogliptin, saxagliptin, and sitagliptin (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 [DPP-4] inhibitors); liraglutide, lixisenatide, and semaglutide (glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists); and empagliflozin (a sodium glucose cotransport-2 inhibitor)...
July 1, 2017: American Journal of Health-system Pharmacy: AJHP
Subodh Verma, Ronald M Goldenberg, Deepak L Bhatt, Michael E Farkouh, Adrian Quan, Hwee Teoh, Kim A Connelly, Lawrence A Leiter, Jan O Friedrich
BACKGROUND: Given recent discrepant results from randomized controlled trials (RCTs), we examined the totality of RCT evidence assessing the association between dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors and heart failure. METHODS: MEDLINE, Embase and were searched without language restrictions to August 2016 for RCTs comparing DPP-4 inhibitors to placebo or no therapy for a period of 24 weeks or more. We included all heart failure outcomes when listed either as a serious adverse event or adverse event...
January 2017: CMAJ Open
Gian Paolo Fadini, Stefania Saragoni, Pierluigi Russo, Luca Degli Esposti, Saula Vigili de Kreutzenberg, Mario Melazzini, Angelo Avogaro
AIMS: To re-analyse data from a previous retrospective study on 127 555 patients, in which we showed that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor therapy was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization for HF (HHF) than sulphonylurea (SU) therapy, in order to evaluate intraclass differences among DPP-4 inhibitors and SUs. METHODS: We included patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) initiating DPP-4 inhibitor or SU therapy, alone or in combination with metformin...
October 2017: Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism
André J Scheen
The prevalence of heart failure (HF) is increasing in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and glucose-lowering agents have distinctive effects on the risk of developing HF that requires hospitalization. Such an increased risk has been consistently reported with thiazolidinediones (glitazones) and perhaps also with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor saxagliptin (at least in SAVOR - TIMI 53), whereas a markedly decreased risk was highlighted with the sodium - glucose cotransporter type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin in EMPA-REG OUTCOME...
April 2017: Diabetes & Metabolism
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