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Physician empathy

R M Gracia Gozalo, J M Ferrer Tarrés, A Ayora Ayora, M Alonso Herrero, A Amutio Kareaga, R Ferrer Roca
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of a mindfulness training program on the levels of burnout, mindfulness, empathy and self-compassion among healthcare professionals in an Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary hospital. DESIGN: A longitudinal study with an intrasubject pre-post intervention design was carried out. SETTING: Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 32 subjects (physicians, nurses and nursing assistants) participated in the study...
March 12, 2018: Medicina Intensiva
Mustafa Afifi
OBJECTIVE: To find the association of Empathy, Self-Efficacy, and/or Hope with readiness for lifelong learning among medical students. METHODS: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2016 at Ras Al-Khaimah Medical and Health Sciences University in the United Arab Emirates, and comprised medical students from all five years. A self-reporting questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic data .Standard scales and analysis of variance test were used to compare the mean scores of different variables for different groups...
March 2018: JPMA. the Journal of the Pakistan Medical Association
Matthew Clark, Asim Shuja, Ashley Thomas, Scott Steinberg, Joseph Geffen, Miguel Malespin, Silvio W de Melo Jr
Background: Studying the role of gastroenterologists' attire can provide insight into patients' perceptions and help us optimize the physician-patient relationship. In this study we assessed patients' preference concerning gastroenterologists' attire, and its influence on patients' trust, empathy and perceptions of the quality of care in the clinic and endoscopic suite. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from August 2016 to February 2017. A total of 240 consecutive patients who presented to the Gastroenterology Department at the University of Florida in Jacksonville both in the clinic and endoscopic suite were included in this study...
March 2018: Annals of Gastroenterology: Quarterly Publication of the Hellenic Society of Gastroenterology
Justin A Charles, Peder Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Jens Søndergaard, Troels Kristensen
Background : Previous studies have demonstrated that high levels of physician empathy may be correlated with improved patient health outcomes and high physician job satisfaction. Knowledge about variation in empathy and related general practitioner (GP) characteristics may allow for a more informed approach to improve empathy among GPs. Objective : Our objective is to measure and analyze variation in physician empathy and its association with GP demographic, professional, and job satisfaction characteristics...
March 2, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Anette Fischer Pedersen, Mads Lind Ingeman, Peter Vedsted
OBJECTIVE: Research has suggested that physicians' gut feelings are associated with parents' concerns for the well-being of their children. Gut feeling is particularly important in diagnosis of serious low-incidence diseases in primary care. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether empathy, that is, the ability to understand what another person is experiencing, relates to general practitioners' (GPs) use of gut feelings. Since empathy is associated with burn-out, we also examined whether the hypothesised influence of empathy on gut feeling use is dependent on level of burn-out...
February 28, 2018: BMJ Open
Jennifer N Stojan, Eleanor Y Sun, Arno K Kumagai
PURPOSE: Educational approaches involving patient stories aim at enhancing empathy and patient-centered care; however, it is not known whether the influence of such programs on physician attitudes persists beyond medical school. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Family Centered Experience (FCE) paired preclinical medical students with patient families over two years and engaged students in reflective dialogs about the volunteers' stories. This study examined possible long-term influences on attitudes toward medicine and doctoring...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
Lester Liao, Edwin Cheng
Empathy has been difficult to sustain and foster in medical training. Based on empirical evidence and intuitive human experience, this paper proposes that empathy can be re-conceptualized as a dynamic reservoir, referred to as an "empathy tank." Physicians and learners who have personally experienced or received much empathy will naturally have a stronger tendency and greater capacity for empathy than others who have experienced little. These instances of empathy that fill the "empathy tank" can take the form of personal experiences, re-experiencing memories, and vicarious experiences...
February 28, 2018: Medical Teacher
Thomas J M Kootstra, Suzanne C Wilkens, Mariano E Menendez, David Ring
BACKGROUND: In prior work we demonstrated that patient-rated physician empathy was the strongest driver of patient satisfaction after a visit to an orthopaedic hand surgeon. Data from the primary care setting suggest a positive association between physician empathy and clinical outcomes, including symptoms of the common cold. It is possible that an empathic encounter could make immediate and measureable changes in a patient's mindset, symptoms, and functional limitations. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Comparing patients who rated their physicians as perfectly empathic with those who did not, is there a difference in pre- to postvisit change in Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Upper Extremity Function scores? (2) Do patients who gave their physicians perfectly empathic ratings have a greater decrease in pre- to postvisit change in Pain Intensity, PROMIS Pain Interference, and PROMIS Depression scores? METHODS: Between September 2015 and February 2016, based on the clinic patient flow, 134 new patients were asked to participate in this study...
February 23, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Suzanne C Wilkens, Jonathan Lans, Claudia A Bargon, David Ring, Neal C Chen
BACKGROUND: Prior research documents that greater psychologic distress (anxiety/depression) and less effective coping strategies (catastrophic thinking, kinesophobia) are associated with greater pain intensity and greater limitations. Recognition and acknowledgment of verbal and nonverbal indicators of psychologic factors might raise opportunities for improved psychologic health. There is evidence that specific patient words and phrases indicate greater catastrophic thinking. This study tested proposed nonverbal indicators (such as flexion of the wrist during attempted finger flexion or extension of uninjured fingers as the stiff and painful finger is flexed) for their association with catastrophic thinking...
February 14, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Daniel Skinner, Kyle Rosenberger
In response to changes in health care, American medical schools are transforming their curricula to cultivate empathy, promote professionalism, and increase cultural competency. Many scholars argue that an infusion of the humanities in premedical and medical training may help achieve these ends. This study analyzes Web-based messaging of Ohio's undergraduate institutions to assess premedical advising attitudes toward humanities-based coursework and majors. Results suggest that although many institutions acknowledge the humanities, most steer students toward science majors; strong advocates of the humanities tend to have religious or other special commitments, and instead of acknowledging the intrinsic value that the humanities might have for future physicians, most institutions promote the humanities because entrance exams now contain related material...
January 2018: Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development
Anthony E Brenneman, Constance Goldgar, Karen J Hills, Jennifer H Snyder, Stephane P VanderMeulen, Steven Lane
Physician assistant (PA) admissions processes have typically given more weight to cognitive attributes than to noncognitive ones, both because a high level of cognitive ability is needed for a career in medicine and because cognitive factors are easier to measure. However, there is a growing consensus across the health professions that noncognitive attributes such as emotional intelligence, empathy, and professionalism are important for success in clinical practice and optimal care of patients. There is also some evidence that a move toward more holistic admissions practices, including evaluation of noncognitive attributes, can have a positive effect on diversity...
March 2018: Journal of Physician Assistant Education
S Claiborne Johnston
Artificial intelligence and other forms of information technology are only just beginning to change the practice of medicine. The pace of change is expected to accelerate as tools improve and as demands for analyzing a rapidly growing body of knowledge and array of data increase. The medical students of today will practice in a world where information technology is sophisticated and omnipresent. In this world, the tasks of memorization and analysis will be less important to them as practicing physicians. On the other hand, the non-analytical, humanistic aspects of medicine-most importantly, the art of caring-will remain a critical function of the physician, and facility with improving systems of care will be required...
February 13, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Michele Arigliani, Luigi Castriotta, Anna Pusiol, Annachiara Titolo, Enrico Petoello, Alberto Brun Peressut, Elisabetta Miorin, Iana Elkina, Federico Marzona, Davide Cucchiaro, Elisa Spanghero, Matteo Pavan, Raffaele Arigliani, Stewart W Mercer, Paola Cogo
BACKGROUND: Empathy is a key element of "Patient and Family Centered Care", a clinical approach recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, there is a lack of validated tools to evaluate paediatrician empathy. This study aimed to validate the Visual CARE Measure, a patient rated questionnaire measuring physician empathy, in the setting of a Pediatric Emergency Department (ED). METHODS: The empathy of physicians working in the Pediatric ED of the University Hospital of Udine, Italy, was assessed using an Italian translation of the Visual Care Measure...
February 13, 2018: BMC Pediatrics
Ryan P Calfee
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 8, 2018: Clinical Orthopaedics and related Research
Sophie Lelorain, Stéphane Cattan, Florian Lordick, Anja Mehnert, Christophe Mariette, Véronique Christophe, Alexis Cortot
OBJECTIVE: In cancer settings, physician empathy is not always linked to a better patient emotional quality of life quality of life (eQoL). We tested two possible moderators of the inconsistent link: type of consultation (bad news versus follow-up) and patient emotional skills (emoSkills, i.e., the way patients process emotional information). METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 296 thoracic and digestive tract cancer patients completed validated questionnaires to assess their physician empathy, their emoSkills and eQoL...
February 1, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Marianna D LaNoue, Debra L Roter
OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationships between self-reported Empathy and the patient-centered communication patterns of physician trainees. METHODS: "Eighty-four 3rd year medical students completed the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE - student version) and had recordings of a single OSCE analyzed using the Roter Interactional Analysis System (RIAS). Correlation and regression were employed to explore the relationships among JSE total score, 3 JSE subscales, 10 composite codes of provider communication, and a summary 'patient centered communication' ratio, reflecting the balance of psychosocial and emotional to biomedical communication of the simulated patient and student...
January 29, 2018: Patient Education and Counseling
Sara W Nelson, Carl A Germann, Casey Z MacVane, Rebecca B Bloch, Timothy S Fallon, Tania D Strout
Introduction: Prior work links empathy and positive physician-patient relationships to improved healthcare outcomes. The objective of this study was to analyze a patient experience simulation for emergency medicine (EM) interns as a way to teach empathy and conscientious patient care. Methods: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study on an in situ, patient experience simulation held during EM residency orientation. Half the interns were patients brought into the emergency department (ED) by ambulance and half were family members...
January 2018: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Salvatore Mangione, Chayan Chakraborti, Giuseppe Staltari, Rebecca Harrison, Allan R Tunkel, Kevin T Liou, Elizabeth Cerceo, Megan Voeller, Wendy L Bedwell, Keaton Fletcher, Marc J Kahn
BACKGROUND: Literature, music, theater, and visual arts play an uncertain and limited role in medical education. One of the arguments often advanced in favor of teaching the humanities refers to their capacity to foster traits that not only improve practice, but might also reduce physician burnout-an increasing scourge in today's medicine. Yet, research remains limited. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that medical students with higher exposure to the humanities would report higher levels of positive physician qualities (e...
January 29, 2018: Journal of General Internal Medicine
J Damon Dagnone
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Canadian Medical Education Journal
Lester Liao
Troubling trends of depression, burnout, and declines in empathy have been demonstrated amongst residents. I argue that while interventions in medical education are helpful, a new perspective on the issue requires a more fundamental understanding of this problem. Rather than training physicians to act in certain ways, we must first recognize that physicians are first and foremost people. This core principle forms the basis of the framework that educators can use to help learners. Five areas of humanity with implications for physicians are discussed: 1) Physicians and patients share their humanity; 2) People are self-integrated in both personal and professional lives; 3) People are dynamic, thoughtful, and emotional; 4) People are finite; and 5) People are moral beings...
December 2017: Canadian Medical Education Journal
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