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nicotine patch

Ping Ma, Darla E Kendzor, Insiya B Poonawalla, David S Balis, Michael S Businelle
INTRODUCTION: Individuals who use the nicotine patch are more likely to quit smoking than those who receive placebo or no medication. However, studies have not yet examined the association between actual daily nicotine patch wear time during the early phase of a smoking cessation attempt and later smoking abstinence. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature. METHODS: Participants who enrolled in a safety-net hospital smoking cessation program were followed for 13 weeks (i...
October 18, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
N Berndt, H de Vries, L Lechner, F Van Acker, E S Froelicher, F Verheugt, A Mudde, C Bolman
BACKGROUND: Without assistance, smokers being admitted to the hospital for coronary heart disease often return to regular smoking within a year. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the 12-month effectiveness of a telephone and a face-to-face counselling intervention on smoking abstinence among cardiac patients. Differential effects for subgroups varying in their socioeconomic status and intention to quit smoking were also studied. METHODS: A randomised controlled trial was used...
October 17, 2016: Netherlands Heart Journal
Erin C Quinn, Rachel Sacks, Shannon M Farley, Sayone Thihalolipavan
Approximately 80,000 New York City smokers are Chinese or Russian speakers. To increase utilization of smoking cessation services among these populations, the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene developed linguistically and culturally tailored outreach strategies to promote and enhance its annual Nicotine Patch and Gum Program. In 2010, online web applications in Chinese and Russian were introduced. In 2011, input was sought from the community to develop Russian-language radio and newspaper ads, and a Russian-speaking liaison provided phone-assisted online enrollment support...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Community Health
Joan S Tucker, William G Shadel, Frank H Galvan, Diana Naranjo, Christian Lopez, Claude Setodji
Nicotine replacement therapy is an effective intervention for smoking cessation, but adherence tends to be low. This article presents results from a pilot evaluation of a brief smoking cessation treatment to improve adherence to the nicotine patch among Latino smokers living with HIV/AIDS. Forty smokers were randomized to receive either a standard 5 As counseling session and 8-week treatment of nicotine patch, or a similar intervention that added a 10-min module to the 5 As counseling that focused on improving adherence to the nicotine patch...
October 13, 2016: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors
Nicola Lindson-Hawley, Jamie Hartmann-Boyce, Thomas R Fanshawe, Rachna Begh, Amanda Farley, Tim Lancaster
BACKGROUND: Although smoking cessation is currently the only guaranteed way to reduce the harm caused by tobacco smoking, a reasonable secondary tobacco control approach may be to try and reduce the harm from continued tobacco use amongst smokers unable or unwilling to quit. Possible approaches to reduce the exposure to toxins from smoking include reducing the amount of tobacco used, and using less toxic products, such as pharmaceutical, nicotine and potential reduced-exposure tobacco products (PREPs), as an alternative to cigarettes...
October 13, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Marita Hefler, Robyn Hopkins, David P Thomas
OBJECTIVES: In 2013, the Northern Territory was the first Australian jurisdiction to introduce a smoke-free policy for all correctional facilities. We report on a process evaluation to identify what worked well, key challenges and unintended consequences. METHODS: We interviewed 87 people, comprising remand, medium-security and low-security prisoners; visiting family members; and prison staff (including prison management and health workers). A realist evaluation approach was used...
April 15, 2016: Public Health Research & Practice
Meghan J Chenoweth, Rachel F Tyndale
Worldwide, approximately one billion people smoke cigarettes. Cigarette smoking persists in part because long-term smoking cessation rates are modest on existing treatments. Smoking cessation outcomes are influenced by genetic factors, including genetic variation in enzymes that metabolize nicotine and smoking cessation medications, as well as in receptor targets for nicotine and treatment medications. For example, smokers with genetically slow nicotine metabolism have higher cessation success on behavioural counseling and nicotine patches compared with smokers with genetically fast nicotine metabolism...
October 3, 2016: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences
Sun S Kim, Somporn Sitthisongkram, Kunsook Bernstein, Hua Fang, Won S Choi, Douglas Ziedonis
INTRODUCTION: Korean women are reluctant to pursue in-person smoking cessation treatment due to stigma attached to women smokers and prefer treatment such as telephone and online smoking cessation programs that they can access secretively at home. However, there is some evidence that face-to-face interaction is the most helpful intervention component for them to quit smoking. METHODS: This study is a pilot clinical trial that examined the acceptability and feasibility of a videoconferencing smoking cessation intervention for Korean American women and compared its preliminary efficacy with a telephone-based intervention...
2016: International Journal of Women's Health
Sharon E Cummins, Anthony C Gamst, Kendra Brandstein, Gregory B Seymann, Hillary Klonoff-Cohen, Carrie A Kirby, Elisa K Tong, Edward Chaplin, Gary J Tedeschi, Shu-Hong Zhu
INTRODUCTION: Most smokers abstain from smoking during hospitalization but relapse upon discharge. This study tests the effectiveness of two proven treatments (i.e., nicotine patches and telephone counseling) in helping these patients stay quit after discharge from the hospital, and assesses a model of hospital-quitline partnership. STUDY DESIGN: This study had a 2×2 factorial design in which participants were stratified by recruitment site and smoking rate and randomly assigned to usual care, nicotine patches only, counseling only, or patches plus counseling...
October 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
James Loughead, Mary Falcone, E Paul Wileyto, Benjamin Albelda, Janet Audrain-McGovern, Wen Cao, Matthew M Kurtz, Ruben C Gur, Caryn Lerman
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Deficits in cognitive function are observed during nicotine withdrawal and present a challenge to successful smoking cessation. This clinical trial evaluated a cognitive exercise training (CT) program to improve smoking cessation rates. METHODS: Adult treatment-seeking smokers (n=213) were randomized to receive nicotine patch therapy and 12 weeks of either computerized CT or computerized relaxation (control) training. Smoking status was biochemically verified at the end of treatment and 6-month follow-up...
August 27, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Jamie Hartmann-Boyce, Hayden McRobbie, Chris Bullen, Rachna Begh, Lindsay F Stead, Peter Hajek
BACKGROUND: Electronic cigarettes (ECs) are electronic devices that heat a liquid into an aerosol for inhalation. The liquid usually comprises propylene glycol and glycerol, with or without nicotine and flavours, and stored in disposable or refillable cartridges or a reservoir. Since ECs appeared on the market in 2006 there has been a steady growth in sales. Smokers report using ECs to reduce risks of smoking, but some healthcare organizations, tobacco control advocacy groups and policy makers have been reluctant to encourage smokers to switch to ECs, citing lack of evidence of efficacy and safety...
September 14, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Sarah B Windle, Kristian B Filion, Joseph G Mancini, Lauren Adye-White, Lawrence Joseph, Genevieve C Gore, Bettina Habib, Roland Grad, Louise Pilote, Mark J Eisenberg
CONTEXT: Treatment guidelines recommend the use of combination therapies for smoking cessation, particularly behavioral therapy (BT) as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. However, these guidelines rely on previous reviews with important limitations. This study's objective was to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapies compared with monotherapies, using the most rigorous data available. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs of pharmacotherapies, BTs, or both were conducted...
September 8, 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Christi A Patten, Carrie A Bronars, Kristin S Vickers Douglas, Michael H Ussher, James A Levine, Susannah J Tye, Christine A Hughes, Tabetha A Brockman, Paul A Decker, Ramona S DeJesus, Mark D Williams, Thomas P Olson, Matthew M Clark, Angela M Dieterich
INTRODUCTION: Few studies have evaluated exercise interventions for smokers with depression or other psychiatric comorbidities. This pilot study evaluated the potential role of supervised vigorous exercise as a smoking cessation intervention for depressed females. METHODS: Thirty adult women with moderate-severe depressive symptoms were enrolled and randomly assigned to 12 weeks of thrice weekly, in person sessions of vigorous intensity supervised exercise at a YMCA setting (EX; n = 15) or health education (HE; n = 15)...
September 9, 2016: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Monica Webb Hooper, Michael H Antoni, Kolawole Okuyemi, Noella A Dietz, Ken Resnicow
INTRODUCTION: This study tested the efficacy of group-based culturally specific cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for smoking cessation among low-income African Americans. METHODS: Participants (N = 342; 63.8% male; M = 49.5 years old; M cigarettes per day = 18) were randomly assigned to eight sessions of group-based culturally specific or standard CBT, plus 8 weeks of transdermal nicotine patches. Biochemically verified 7-day point prevalence abstinence (ppa) was assessed at the end-of-therapy (ie, CBT) (EOT), and 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups...
July 15, 2016: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Philip H Smith, Andrea H Weinberger, Ju Zhang, Erin Emme, Carolyn M Mazure, Sherry A McKee
INTRODUCTION: Converging clinical and biological evidence suggest sex is an important factor when selecting a pharmacological intervention for smoking cessation. The current investigation used network meta-analyses to estimate sex differences in the comparative efficacy of transdermal nicotine (TN), varenicline, and sustained release (SR) bupropion for smoking cessation. METHODS: Systematically searched previously published reviews and databases (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of bupropion-SR, TN, and varenicline for cigarette smoking cessation in primary care/general community samples were included...
July 11, 2016: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Arthur L Brody, Todd Zorick, Robert Hubert, Gerhard S Hellemann, Shabnam Balali, Sarah S Kawasaki, Lizette Y Garcia, Ryutaro Enoki, Paul Abraham, Paulina Young, Charles McCreary
INTRODUCTION: The majority of people with schizophrenia have a diagnosis of tobacco dependence during their lifetime. A major obstacle to reducing the burden of cigarette smoking in this population is that these smokers have lower quit rates when undergoing standard treatment compared to smokers with no mental illness. We sought to determine if combination extended treatment (COMB-EXT) and home visits (HV) would lead to improved outcomes in smokers with schizophrenia. METHODS: Thirty-four cigarette smokers with schizophrenia completed either COMB-EXT with HV, COMB-EXT without HV, or treatment as usual (TAU) (random assignment)...
August 3, 2016: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Luis R Vaz, Paul Aveyard, Sue Cooper, Jo Leonardi-Bee, Tim Coleman
INTRODUCTION: In nonpregnant "quitters," adherence to nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increases smoking cessation. We investigated relationships between adherence to placebo or NRT patches and cessation in pregnancy, including an assessment of reverse causation and whether any adherence: cessation relationship is moderated when using nicotine or placebo patches. METHODS: Using data from 1050 pregnant trial participants, regression models investigated associations between maternal characteristics, adherence and smoking cessation...
October 2016: Nicotine & Tobacco Research: Official Journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco
Umesh Wadgave, L Nagesh
Today tobacco use is the single greatest preventable cause of death in the world. Tobacco use is often incorrectly perceived to be solely a personal choice. This is contradicted by the fact that when fully aware of the health impact, most tobacco users want to quit but find it difficult to stop due to the addictiveness of nicotine. Henceforth, Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) came into existence which temporarily replaces much of the nicotine from tobacco to reduce motivation to consume tobacco and nicotine withdrawal symptoms, thus easing the transition from cigarette smoking to complete abstinence...
July 2016: International Journal of Health Sciences
Lisa M Fucito, Benjamin A Toll, Corey R Roos, Andrea C King
INTRODUCTION: Smokers' treatment expectancies may influence their choice of a particular medication as well as their medication experience. AIMS: This study examined the role of smokers' treatment expectancies to their smoking cessation outcomes in a completed, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of naltrexone for smoking cessation, controlling for perceptions of treatment assignment. METHODS: Treatment seeking cigarette smokers (N = 315) were randomized to receive either naltrexone (50 mg) or placebo in combination with nicotine patch and behavioral counseling...
September 2016: Journal of Smoking Cessation
Jian-Rong Zhou, Tetsuya Shirasaki, Fumio Soeda, Kazuo Takahama
In this study, we investigated the effects of suplatast on acutely dissociated single neurons of sensory and paratracheal ganglia using a patch-clamp technique. Suplatast had little effect on various responses caused by capsaicin, acid, bradykinin, serotonin and adenosine 5'-triphosphate in rat sensory neurons. Suplatast, even at 10-3 M, also did not induce any current at various membrane potentials in rat and guinea pig paratracheal ganglia neurons. Further, acetylcholine- and bradykinin-induced depolarizations were not affected by suplatast...
August 26, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology
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