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Intubation critical care

Michael T Long, Matthew P Murray
Tongue entrapments within bottles are very rare childhood mishaps. The most immediate hazard in a tongue entrapment is airway obstruction. Tongue entrapment is an airway emergency; contingency planning to maintain airway patency, oxygenation, and ventilation is critical. Here, we report the case of a 5-year-old girl presenting to a pediatric emergency department with an increasingly popular novelty soda bottle, featuring a unique and dangerous design, entrapped on her tongue. Operative removal was anticipated...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Laurence Ducharme-Crevier, Michele G Mills, Priya M Mehta, Craig M Smith, Mark S Wainwright
BACKGROUND: The primary objective of this study was to characterize changes in cerebral blood flow measured using transcranial Doppler in children with central nervous system infections. We hypothesized that children with central nervous system infections have abnormal cerebral blood flow, associated with a greater frequency of complications and poor neurological outcome. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective study of children admitted to the neonatal or pediatric intensive care unit with central nervous system infection and undergoing transcranial Doppler as part of routine care between March 2011 and July 2015...
September 4, 2016: Pediatric Neurology
Gerardo Bosco, Giacomo Garetto, Alessandro Rubini, Antonio Paoli, Prachiti Dalvi, Devanand Mangar, Enrico M Camporesi
INTRODUCTION: Some patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) might require repetitive hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) while receiving critical care. In such cases, the presence of a hyperbaric chamber located inside or near an ICU is preferable; however, this set-up is not always possible. In Padua, the "Associazione Tecnici IPerbarici" hyperbaric centre is a stand-alone facility outside of a hospital. Despite this, selected ICU patients receive HBOT at this facility. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records from 2003 to 2013 of 75 consecutive, critically-ill patients, 28 of whom were initially intubated and mechanically ventilated whilst undergoing HBOT...
September 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
Anahita Rouzé, Julien De Jonckheere, Farid Zerimech, Julien Labreuche, Erika Parmentier-Decrucq, Benoit Voisin, Emmanuelle Jaillette, Patrice Maboudou, Malika Balduyck, Saad Nseir
BACKGROUND: Despite intermittent control of tracheal cuff pressure (P cuff) using a manual manometer, cuff underinflation (<20 cmH2O) and overinflation (>30 cmH2O) frequently occur in intubated critically ill patients, resulting in increased risk of microaspiration and tracheal ischemic lesions. The primary objective of our study was to determine the efficiency of an electronic device in continuously controlling P cuff. The secondary objective was to determine the impact of this device on the occurrence of microaspiration of gastric or oropharyngeal secretions...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
Jeffrey Siegler, Melissa Kroll, Susan Wojcik, Hawnwan Philip Moy
INTRODUCTION: In the prehospital setting, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) professionals rely on providing positive pressure ventilation with a bag-valve-mask (BVM). Multiple emergency medicine and critical care studies have shown that lung-protective ventilation protocols reduce morbidity and mortality. Our primary objective was to determine if a group of EMS professionals could provide ventilations with a smaller BVM that would be sufficient to ventilate patients. Secondary objectives included 1) if the pediatric bag provided volumes similar to lung-protective ventilation in the hospital setting and 2) compare volumes provided to the patient depending on the type of airway (mask, King tube, and intubation)...
October 3, 2016: Prehospital Emergency Care
Wayne Varndell, Margaret Fry, Doug Elliott
AIM: This systematic review examined the psychometric properties and suitability of the available observational pain instruments for potential use with nonverbal critically ill adult patients in the emergency department. BACKGROUND: In the emergency department assessing pain in critically ill patients is challenging, especially those unable to communicate the presence of pain. Critically ill patients are commonly unable to verbally communicate pain due to altered oral communication (e...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Simone Thomas, Wolfgang Sauter, Ulrike Starrost, Marcus Pohl, Jan Mehrholz
BACKGROUND: Treatment of critical illness on intensive-care-units (ICU) results often in persistent invasive endotracheal intubation which might delay rehabilitation and increases the risk of mortality. Recent longitudinal studies have described the recovery of critically ill people, but the detailed time course of decannulation in patients with chronic critical illness with ICU- acquired muscle weakness (ICUAW) is not well known. AIM: The aim of our study was therefore to describe the decannulation times and associated risk factors in patients who are chronic critically ill with ICU acquired weakness...
September 27, 2016: European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Ahmed Hasanin, Sabah Abdel Raouf Mohamed, Akram El-Adawy
Pain is a common and undertreated problem in critically ill patients. Pain assessment in critically ill patients is challenging and relies on complex scoring systems. The aim of this work was to find out the possible role of the perfusion index (PI) measured by a pulse oximeter (Masimo Radical 7; Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA) in pain assessment in critically ill patients. A prospective observational study was carried out on 87 sedated non-intubated patients in a surgical intensive care unit. In addition to routine monitoring, a Masimo pulse oximeter probe was used for PI measurement...
September 24, 2016: Journal of Clinical Monitoring and Computing
Lisa Wolf, Connie M Ulrich, Christine Grady
Excellent patient care within the emergency department requires interdisciplinary training, teamwork, and communication to manage the chaos of the environment. Specifically, invasive procedures required to manage airway, breathing, and circulation via intubation, chest compressions, and establishing intravenous access can provide a direct benefit to save lives but also have the potential to harm both patients and health care clinicians alike; emergency health care clinicians can be exposed to significant amounts of blood and body fluids as well as other threats of physical and psychological harm...
September 2016: Hastings Center Report
Andrew C Faust, Pearl Rajan, Lyndsay A Sheperd, Carlos A Alvarez, Phyllis McCorstin, Rebecca L Doebele
BACKGROUND: Recent attention to adverse effects of intensive care unit (ICU) sedation has led to the use of strategies that target a "lighter" depth of sedation. Among these strategies are "analgosedation" protocols, which prioritize pain management and preferentially use IV opioids before administration of continuously infused sedatives such as propofol or midazolam. We hypothesized that using an analgosedation protocol would result in a shorter duration of mechanical ventilation than a protocol with greater emphasis on IV sedatives METHODS: : We conducted a retrospective study comparing the duration of mechanical ventilation before and after implementation of an analgosedation protocol in a 24-bed medical ICU...
October 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Tyler J Loftus, Scott C Brakenridge, Frederick A Moore, Stephen J Lemon, Linda L Nguyen, Stacy A Voils, Janeen R Jordan, Chasen A Croft, R Stephen Smith, Phillip A Efron, Alicia M Mohr
BACKGROUND: Despite the excellent negative predictive value of sterile respiratory cultures, antibiotics often are continued after negative endotracheal aspirate (ETA) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for critically ill trauma patients. We hypothesized that persistent elevation of the Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS) would predict continued antibiotic therapy after a negative respiratory culture for intubated trauma patients, and that prolonged antibiotics would provide no benefit...
September 16, 2016: Surgical Infections
M M Harish, S Janarthanan, Suhail Sarwar Siddiqui, Harish K Chaudhary, Natesh R Prabu, Jigeeshu V Divatia, Atul Prabhakar Kulkarni
BACKGROUND: The transport of critically ill patients for procedures or tests outside the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is potentially hazardous; hence, the transport process must be organized and efficient. Plenty of data is available on pre- and inter-hospital transport of patients; the data on intrahospital transport of patients are limited. We audited the complications and benefits of intrahospital transport of critically ill patients in our tertiary care center over 6 months. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty adult critically ill cancer patients transported from the ICU for either diagnostic or therapeutic procedure over 6 months were included...
August 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
G Fatima Shirly Anitha, Lakshmi Velmurugan, Shanthi Sangareddi, Krishnamurthy Nedunchelian, Vinoth Selvaraj
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an emerging popular concept, which includes bi-level positive airway pressure or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In settings with scarce resources for NIV machines, CPAP can be provided through various indigenous means and one such mode is flow inflating device - Jackson-Rees circuit (JR)/Bain circuit. The study analyses the epidemiology, various clinical indications, predictors of CPAP failure, and stresses the usefulness of flow inflating device as an indigenous way of providing CPAP...
August 2016: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Robert S Green, Dean A Fergusson, Alexis F Turgeon, Lauralyn A McIntyre, George J Kovacs, Donald E Griesdale, Ryan Zarychanski, Michael B Butler, Nelofar Kureshi, Mete Erdogan
INTRODUCTION: Respiratory failure is a common problem in emergency medicine (EM) and critical care medicine (CCM). However, little is known about the resuscitation of critically ill patients prior to emergency endotracheal intubation (EETI). Our aim was to describe the resuscitation practices of EM and CCM physicians prior to EETI. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was developed and tested for content validity and retest reliability by members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group...
September 2016: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine
Kathleen Winter, James D Cherry, Kathleen Harriman
BACKGROUND:  All U.S. women are recommended to receive Tdap vaccine at 27-36 weeks gestation during each pregnancy to reduce the risk of pertussis to their infants. The impact of this strategy on severity of disease among infected infants has not been evaluated. METHODS:  We use a retrospective cohort study design evaluating whether pertussis-infected infants born in 2011-2015 whose mothers received Tdap vaccine during pregnancy had less severe pertussis, resulting in a lower risk of hospitalization or intensive care unit (ICU) admission compared to infants born to unvaccinated mothers...
September 13, 2016: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Jonathan Messika, David Hajage, Nataly Panneckoucke, Serge Villard, Yolaine Martin, Emilie Renard, Annie Blivet, Jean Reignier, Natacha Maquigneau, Annabelle Stoclin, Christelle Puechberty, Stéphane Guétin, Aline Dechanet, Amandine Fauquembergue, Stéphane Gaudry, Didier Dreyfuss, Jean-Damien Ricard
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) tolerance is a key factor of NIV success. Hence, numerous sedative pharmacological or non-pharmacological strategies have been assessed to improve NIV tolerance. Music therapy in various health care settings has shown beneficial effects. In invasively ventilated critical care patients, encouraging results of music therapy on physiological parameters, anxiety, and agitation have been reported. We hypothesize that a musical intervention improves NIV tolerance in comparison to conventional care...
2016: Trials
Eriko Miyata, Atsushi Tanaka, Hiroki Emori, Akira Taruya, Shinji Miyai, Nobuo Sakagoshi
OBJECTIVE: Pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery is the leading cause of mortality. Postoperative aspiration pneumonia becomes a critical issue in the management of cardiovascular surgery in the aging society. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors of aspiration pneumonia after cardiovascular surgery for elderly patients. METHODS: This study consisted of 123 elderly patients (>65 years old) who survived their final extubation following cardiovascular surgery at Kinan Hospital...
September 9, 2016: General Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
G Jansen, B Schmidt, F Mertzlufft, T Boesing, M Barthel
Tracheal agenesis (TA) is a very rare congenital malformation of unknown aetiology. It is often associated with polymalformative syndromes; the neonates commonly present a critical condition during post-natal treatment. Pathology revolves around the triad of aphonia, respiratory distress syndrome and impossibility of endotracheal intubation. In contrast to the most important differential diagnosis, i. e., congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS), surgical airway management is also impossible due to the absence of tracheal structures...
October 2016: Der Anaesthesist
Yuko Ono, Takuya Sugiyama, Yasuyuki Chida, Tetsuya Sato, Hiroaki Kikuchi, Daiji Suzuki, Masakazu Ikeda, Koichi Tanigawa, Kazuaki Shinohara
BACKGROUND: A reduction in medical staff such as occurs in hospitals during nights and weekends (off hours) is associated with a worse outcome in patients with several unanticipated critical conditions. Although difficult airway management (DAM) requires the simultaneous assistance of several appropriately trained medical caregivers, data are scarce regarding the association between off-hour presentation and endotracheal intubation (ETI)-related adverse events, especially in the trauma population...
2016: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
Robert S Green, Dean A Fergusson, Alexis F Turgeon, Lauralyn A McIntyre, George J Kovacs, Donald E Griesdale, Ryan Zarychanski, Michael B Butler, Nelofar Kureshi, Mete Erdogan
OBJECTIVES: Various medications and devices are available for facilitation of emergent endotracheal intubations (EETIs). The objective of this study was to survey which medications and devices are being utilized for intubation by Canadian physicians. METHODS: A clinical scenario-based survey was developed to determine which medications physicians would administer to facilitate EETI, their first choice of intubation device, and backup strategy should their first choice fail...
August 30, 2016: CJEM
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