Read by QxMD icon Read

Ethics palliative care

Stephanie Stiel, Mareike Nurnus, Christoph Ostgathe, Carsten Klein
BACKGROUND: Clinical practice of Palliative Sedation (PS) varies between institutions worldwide and sometimes includes problematic practices. Little available research points at different definitions and frameworks which may contribute to uncertainty of healthcare professionals in the application of PS. This analysis investigates what demographic factors and characteristics of treatment practices differ between institutions with high versus low sedation rates estimates in Palliative and Hospice Care in Germany...
March 13, 2018: BMC Palliative Care
Kristi Soileau, Nanette Elster
The hospice philosophy embraces palliative care for the terminally ill, for whom quality of life is the central focus of comfort care management. Often, caregivers hesitate or simply do not elect to extend oral care for patients nearing the end of life, due to difficulties encountered in patient compliance, a sense of futility in doing so, staff time constraints in prioritizing care, underfunding, or a lack of education as to how and why such care should be delivered to the hospice patient. This article aims to show physiological and psychosocial reasons why the hospice patient has a need for properly and regularly implemented oral care and why dental professionals have an ethical responsibility to address the current void that exists in hospice-centered oral care...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Palliative Care
John W Wax, Amy W An, Nicole Kosier, Timothy E Quill
Voluntary stopping of eating and drinking (VSED) is a deliberate, self-initiated attempt to hasten death in the setting of suffering refractory to optimal palliative interventions or prolonged dying that a person finds intolerable. Individuals who consider VSED tend to be older, have a serious but not always imminently terminal illness, place a high value on independence, and have significant illness burden. VSED can theoretically be performed independent of clinician assistance and therefore avoids many of the ethical and legal concerns associated with physician-assisted dying or other palliative measures of last resort, However, VSED is an intense process fraught with new sources of somatic and emotional suffering for individuals and their caregivers, so VSED is best supervised by an experienced, well-informed clinician who can provide appropriate pre-intervention assessment, anticipatory guidance, medical treatment of symptoms, and emotional support...
March 2018: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Ludovica De Panfilis, Roberto Satolli, Massimo Costantini
BACKGROUND: This article proposes a retrospective analysis of a compassionate use (CU), using a case study of request for Avelumab for a patient suffering from Merkel Cell Carcinoma. The study is the result of a discussion within a Provincial Ethics Committee (EC) following the finding of a high number of requests for CU program. The primary objective of the study is to illustrate the specific ethical and clinical profiles that emerge from the compassionate use program (CUP) issue. The secondary goals are: a) to promote a moral reflection among physicians who require approval for the CUP and b) provide the basis for recommendations on how to request CUP...
March 9, 2018: BMC Medical Ethics
Stephanie Stiel, Maria Heckel, Kim Nikola Wendt, Martin Weber, Christoph Ostgathe
BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes are usually considered to be the gold standard assessment. However, for the assessment of quality of dying and death, ratings of informal caregivers (ICGs) or health-care professionals (HCPs) must be considered for ethical and methodological reasons. This article aims to present results of ICGs' and HCPs' estimates of the questionnaire, quality of dying and death (QoDD) on patients who died in PCUs and to compare the level of agreement of both ratings/raters...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
R Xia, D H Wang
With the improvement of diagnosis and treatment, tumor has become a chronic disease, and an increasing number of older patients will live with tumors. This change has led to an increase in demand for intensive care unit (ICU) and a challenge to the traditional ICU treatment concept. The option of ICU consists of two parts. The first is the option for admission. Since classic predictors of mortality are no longer relevant, we suggest broadening the criteria for ICU admission. Patients during the first course of cancer therapies should be treated with a full-code status similar to that of other patients without malignancy...
February 23, 2018: Zhonghua Zhong Liu za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Oncology]
Cory Taylor, Jamie C Fertal, Solomon Liao
BACKGROUND: Withdrawal of life-support for an individual with refractory schizophrenia following attempted suicide remains controversial. Discussion regarding prognosis of mental illness and the distinction between somatic and mental illness brings out many ethical issues. This paper will examine the role and weight of severe persistent mental illness in the withdrawal of life support following attempted suicide. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 30-year-old gentleman with deafness and schizophrenia was admitted with multiple self-inflicted visceral stab wounds...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management
N Rose Gaston, Jill M Randall, Lisa R Kiesel
Physician-assisted suicide (PAS) is explicitly legal in five states and by court decision in one. Legislative bills have been introduced in other states including Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. This quantitative study was designed to understand Midwest, hospice and palliative care at end-of-life social workers' attitudes toward PAS, preferred terminology, perception of preparedness for the implementation, and awareness of PAS legislation in their state. Sixty-two social workers from Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin completed an anonymous online survey...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Social Work in End-of-life & Palliative Care
Laurel Willig, Erin Paquette, D Micah Hester, Bradley A Warady, John D Lantos
A 3-month-old boy with failure to thrive was referred to a nephrology clinic after a diagnostic workup for failure to thrive revealed a serum urea nitrogen level of 95 mg/dL and creatinine level of 3.6 mg/dL. A renal ultrasound revealed marked bilateral hydronephrosis with little remaining renal cortex in either kidney. A voiding cystourethrogram revealed evidence of posterior urethral valves. The child had no evident comorbidities. Fulguration of the valves was successfully performed but did not lead to improvement in kidney function...
February 28, 2018: Pediatrics
Angelika Feichtner, Dietmar Weixler, Alois Birklbauer
In some cases terminally ill patients fear of prolonged dying and suffering can manifest itself in the voluntary refusal of food and fluids, aiming to accelerate the dying process. This represents a considerable area of conflict, because of the ethical responsibility to not aid a person's death but also to respect a patients autonomy.There is a clear separation between an assisted suicide and following a patient's wishes. Not to accept the voluntary refusal of FVNF would have to be considered as forced treatment of patients while they are capable of self-determination...
February 27, 2018: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
Christine S Davis, Meghan J Snider, Lynná King, Allison Shukraft, James D Sonda, Laurie Hicks, Lauren Irvin
The death of a child creates especially poignant feelings and extreme stress, distress, and devastation for family members and healthcare providers. In addition, serious or long-term illness forces a reconstruction of our experiences with time and space. In this paper, we report on a long-term ethnographic study of a Pediatric Palliative Care Team (PPCT). Using the concepts of spatiality and temporality; Deleuze's concepts of smooth and striated spaces; Innis's concepts of space and time biases; Foucault's concept of heterotopian space-places with multiple layers of meaning; and a related concept of heterokairoi-moments in time with multiple possibilities-we consider how the PPCT constructs and reconstructs meaning in the midst of chaos, ethical dilemmas, and heartbreaking choices...
February 27, 2018: Health Communication
Philip Kinghorn, Joanna Coast
BACKGROUND: Sen's capability approach is underspecified; one decision left to those operationalising the approach is how to identify sets of relevant and important capabilities. Sen has suggested that lists be developed for specific policy or research objectives through a process of public reasoning and discussion. Robeyns offers further guidance in support of Sen's position, suggesting that lists should be explicit, discussed and defended; methods be openly scrutinised; lists be considered both in terms of what is ideal and what is practical ('generality'); and that lists be exhaustive...
2018: PloS One
Gudrun Kreye, Eva-Katharina Masel, Klaus Hackner, Beate Stich, Friedemann Nauck
Recently, the use of methadone in cancer patients has increased due to in vitro studies indicating that methadone is capable of inducing cell death. However, thus far there are no relevant clinical studies indicating that the use of methadone can prolong survival in cancer patients. Based on low-quality evidence, methadone is a drug that has similar analgesic benefits to morphine and has a role in the management of cancer pain in adults. Other opioids such as morphine, hydromorphone, and fentanyl are easier to manage but may be more expensive than methadone in many economies...
February 19, 2018: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
Martina Radner, Annette Henry
We report about an infant who was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (Werdnig-Hoffmann) at the age of 7 weeks. In a detailed discussion with the physicians the parents decided against mechanical ventilation in the event of either acute or chronical respiratory failure. During care at home all palliative actions were taken to optimize the quality of life for the child. The boy died at the age of 7 months at home. Whether continuous mechanical ventilation in a child with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 should be the individual decision of the parents or whether it should never be offered by the physicians is discussed controversially in the present medical literature...
February 15, 2018: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
Sarah Jane Mitchell, Anne-Marie Slowther, Jane Coad, Shazaan Akhtar, Elizabeth Hyde, Dena Khan, Jeremy Dale
Patient and public involvement (PPI) is important both in research and in quality improvement activities related to healthcare services . While PPI activities do not require formal ethical approval, they can raise a number of ethical concerns, through the introduction of complex technical medical concepts, challenging language or sensitive subject areas. There is very little published literature to guide ethical practice in this area. We have been conducting PPI with children and young people throughout a research study in paediatric palliative care...
February 9, 2018: Archives of Disease in Childhood. Education and Practice Edition
Mohsin Choudry, Aishah Latif, Katharine G Warburton
For many who pertain to particular theological paradigms, their faith cannot be compartmentalised, but is mobilised to inform all aspects of their being, most notably their ethical and moral persuasions. As clinicians, the concept that there are good and bad deaths is already known; understanding the origin and depth of non-physical suffering, and aiming to alleviate it is not possible without learning the individual experiences and beliefs that go with it. Spiritual care forms a fundamental consideration in the endeavor to address the holistic experience of those patients receiving palliative care...
February 2018: Clinical Medicine: Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London
Filipa Macedo, Catarina Nunes, Katia Ladeira, Filipa Pinho, Nadine Saraiva, Nuno Bonito, Luísa Pinto, Francisco Gonçalves
In the advanced stages of illness, patients often face challenging decisions regarding their treatment and overall medical care. Terminal ill patients are commonly affected by infections. However, in palliative care, the use of antimicrobials can be an ethical dilemma. Deciding whether to treat, withhold, or withdraw the antimicrobial treatment for an infection can be difficult. Antimicrobial administration can lead to adverse outcomes but the two main benefits, longer survival and symptom relief, are the main reasons why physicians prescribe antimicrobial when treating terminally ill patients...
February 12, 2018: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
Esra Akin Korhan, Çağatay Üstün, Derya Uzelli Yilmaz
Respecting and valuing an individual's existential dignity forms the basis of nursing and medical practice and of nursing care. The objective of the study was to determine the approach to human dignity that nurses and physicians have while providing palliative care. This qualitative study was performed using a phenomenological research design. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted in 9 nurses and 5 physicians with human dignity approach in palliative care. Following the qualitative Colaizzi method of analyzing the data, the statements made by the nurses and physicians during the interviews were grouped under 8 categories...
March 2018: Holistic Nursing Practice
Elissa Kolva, Barry Rosenfeld, Rebecca Saracino
OBJECTIVE: Despite the clinical, ethical, and legal magnitude of end-of-life decision-making, the capacity of terminally ill patients to make the medical decisions they often face is largely unknown. In practice, clinicians are responsible for determining when their patients are no longer competent to make treatment decisions, yet the accuracy of these assessments is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore decision-making capacity and its assessment in terminally ill cancer patients...
December 27, 2017: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
V Danel-Brunaud, L Touzet, L Chevalier, C Moreau, D Devos, S Vandoolaeghe, L Defebvre
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 31, 2018: Revue Neurologique
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"