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"Study abroad"

Janice M Haley, Pamela H Cone
Learning from experience is a positive approach when preparing for mobile clinic service in a developing country. Mobile clinics provide healthcare services to people in hard to reach areas around the world, but preparation for their use needs to be done in collaboration with local leaders and healthcare providers. For over 16 years, Azusa Pacific University School of Nursing has sponsored mobile clinics to rural northern Haiti with the aim to provide culturally sensitive healthcare in collaboration with Haitian leaders...
August 28, 2016: Nurse Education in Practice
Johis Ortega, Emma McKim Mitchell, Nilda Peragallo
Most articles on nursing student study abroad experiences are one-sided case studies focusing on students and faculty from developed countries who travel to less developed countries. This article presents the perspectives of students from theUnited States, Chile, Mexico, and Taiwan, both sides of the international exchange experience. Students described the real-world, hands-on experience of immersion in a different health system and professional culture as transformational and having a significant impact on their nursing career goals...
July 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Linda S Johanson
Researchers have related participation in study abroad experiences to many positive outcomes for nursing students; however, educators are faced with the task of not only developing meaningful study abroad opportunities but sustaining and improving them as well. Educators can evaluate repeat study abroad programs by comparing experiences, looking for trends, and conjecturing rationales. To illustrate this process, an example of a study abroad opportunity that has been repeated over 11 years is presented. The first six years have been compared to the most recent five years, revealing three categories of change for evaluation and the resulting course improvements...
September 2016: Nursing Education Perspectives
Hendrika J Maltby
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 29, 2016: Nurse Educator
Pamela H Cone, Janice M Haley
Mobile clinics have been used successfully to provide healthcare services to people in hard to reach areas around the world, but their use is sometimes controversial. There are advantages to using mobile clinics among rural underserved populations, and providing access to those who are vulnerable will improve health and decrease morbidity and mortality. However, some teams use inappropriate approaches to international service. For over 15 years, Azusa Pacific University School of Nursing has sponsored mobile clinics to rural northern Haiti with the aim to provide culturally sensitive healthcare in collaboration with Haitian leaders...
September 3, 2016: Nurse Education in Practice
Tina M Kruger, Sarah Gilland, Jacquelyn B Frank, Bridget C Murphy, Courtney English, Jana Meade, Kaylee Morrow, Evan Rush
In May 2014, a short-term study-abroad experience was conducted in Finland through a course offered at Indiana State University (ISU). Students and faculty from ISU and Eastern Illinois University participated in the experience, which was created to facilitate a cross-cultural comparison of long-term-care settings in the United States and Finland. With its outstanding system of caring for the health and social needs of its aging populace, Finland is a logical model to examine when considering ways to improve the quality of life for older adults who require care in the United States ...
September 16, 2016: Gerontology & Geriatrics Education
Hendrika J Maltby, Joy M de Vries-Erich, Karen Lund
AIM: To understand the experience of American nursing students who complete a study abroad trip to a low-income country, Bangladesh, versus a high-income country, the Netherlands in the development of cultural consciousness. METHODS: Hermeneutic (interpretive) phenomenology was used to explore the journals of 44 students' experiences and reflections. RESULTS: The comprehensive understanding of the naïve and structural analysis revealed that, no matter where these students travelled, they increased their cultural consciousness...
October 2016: Nurse Education Today
Giovanni Aresi, Simon Moore, Elena Marta
BACKGROUND: University students who complete study abroad experiences are potentially exposed to behaviors, in particular alcohol and drug use, that place their health at risk. There is a need to identify risk and protective factors and highlight knowledge gaps. METHODS: A systematic review adopting the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology. Relevant bibliographic databases and online repositories were systematically searched for both qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed studies...
December 5, 2016: Substance Use & Misuse
Kerry A Milner, Kim Foito, Sherylyn Watson
Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland...
October 2016: Journal of Christian Nursing: a Quarterly Publication of Nurses Christian Fellowship
Giovanni Aresi, Francesco Fattori, Maura Pozzi, Simon C Moore
The aim was to explore shared representations of alcohol use in students who were to travel abroad to study. Focus group data from Italian students (N = 69) were collected. Analyses used Grounded Theory Methodology and were informed by the four key components of Social Representation Theory (cognition, emotion, attitude and behavioural intentions). The study abroad experience was described as one that would involve an increase in alcohol consumption compared to pre-departure levels. Reasons given included greater social and leisure opportunities involving alcohol, reduced social control and features of the host country environment...
September 5, 2016: Journal of Health Psychology
Windsor W Sherrill, Rachel M Mayo, Khoa D Truong, Anne P Pribonic, Christine A Schalkoff
OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to explore medical students' attitudes and beliefs toward Latino patients, specifically: to assess students' levels of knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos; to determine students' exposure to and previous experience with Latinos; and to evaluate whether factors such as study abroad, living abroad, previous clinical experience with Latinos, and language proficiency predict Latino knowledge, cultural competence, and comfort with Latinos. METHODS: This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design...
2016: International Journal of Medical Education
Seán Kelleher, Serena FitzGerald, Josephine Hegarty
BACKGROUND: Future health care professionals need to be broadly-educated, adaptable individuals who have significant experience in the world beyond the classroom. Study abroad is an ideal means of developing some of the skills and attitudes that are not only valued among health professionals, but also have global applicability. Although internationalisation through study abroad is widely publicised as a preferred means of developing globally competent third level graduates very little is known about the factors that influence students' predisposition to study abroad, students decision making process and how various factors influence that process...
September 2016: Nurse Education Today
Arnd Schulte-Bockolt, Konrad H Soergel, Juergen Stein
Over the past 140 years, the close academic and clinical interactions in Internal Medicine between German-speaking countries and the United States have been through three distinct stages. From 1870 until the First World War, German medical research, teaching, and university organization served as a model for U.S. medical schools and practice. However, after World War I, medical education reforms were implemented in the U.S., and due also to radical economic and political changes at home, German medicine lost its pioneering role...
June 16, 2016: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift
Sachiko Takehara, Fac Wright, Yoko Kawaguchi, Yuji Ishida, Ikuko Morio, Junji Tagami
OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to acquire a deeper understanding of Japanese students' motivation to study abroad and to provide baseline information for nurturing globally-minding dental students. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Students from the first to the sixth year (n = 332), at the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, were invited to participate in the study and were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire, written in Japanese...
October 2016: International Dental Journal
Giovanni Aresi, Simon Moore, Elena Marta
AIMS: To examine changes in alcohol intake and consequences in Italian students studying abroad. METHODS: Italian exchange students planning to study abroad were invited to report on their drinking and alcohol-related negative consequences before and after their time abroad. RESULTS: After excluding those who abstained throughout, data on 121 students were analysed and showed that they tended to consume more alcohol and experience more alcohol-related negative consequences compared to their pre-departure levels...
June 3, 2016: Alcohol and Alcoholism: International Journal of the Medical Council on Alcoholism
H Oka, Y Ishida, G Hong, P T T Nguyen
PURPOSE: Dental faculties in Japan have organised many short-term international exchange programs to enable their undergraduates to study abroad. However, not many students apply for those programs. In this present study, we attempted to clarify the factors that discourage undergraduate dental students from studying abroad. METHODS: We administered a questionnaire survey to 512 undergraduate dental students in three national universities located in different areas in Japan...
June 1, 2016: European Journal of Dental Education: Official Journal of the Association for Dental Education in Europe
Jing Gan, Shao-Lin Ye, Rong Luo, De-Zhi Mu, Chao-Min Wan
OBJECTIVE: To introduce co-word analysis into the analysis of the current research status of childhood tuberculous meningitis, to compare the similarities and differences in research topics of the field in China and abroad over the past decade, and to discover the advantages and weak links in the study field in China. METHODS: PubMed, CNKI, VIP, and Wanfang Data were searched for the articles which met the inclusion criteria. Ucinet 6.0 and Netdraw were used for co-occurrence analysis, and the co-article relationship between high-frequency key words was visualized...
May 2016: Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Contemporary Pediatrics
A Takenouchi, M Sakurai/Matsukubo, T Matsukubo
PURPOSE: Globalization of Japanese dental hygienists is important to match the demands in the present society. The purpose of this study was to gauge opinions on international programmes of Japanese dental hygiene students and educators. METHOD: Data were collected using a survey that was sent to all eight Japanese universities of oral hygiene in December 2014. Participants were composed of 466 university students majoring in oral hygiene (463 women; three men; mean age: 21 years) and 45 educators teaching dental hygiene education (mean age: 50 years)...
May 3, 2016: International Journal of Dental Hygiene
Monne Wihlborg, Elizabeth Friberg
A sound pedagogical framework must be explored and identified to implement opportunities for collaborative learning through international exchange. This paper identifies the framework used by two universities, in Sweden and the United States. Virtual learning environments and meaningful learning activities can be constructed using web-based learning platforms. The goal for this initiative was 'internationalisation on home plan' for nursing faculty and students that opened up internationalised learning opportunities for all students, including those who do not participate in study abroad/mobility activities...
June 2016: Nurse Education Today
Lulu Song, Rachel Pulverman, Christina Pepe, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, Kathy Hirsh-Pasek
Learning a language is more than learning its vocabulary and grammar. For example, compared to English, Spanish uses many more path verbs such as ascender ('to move upward') and salir ('to go out'), and expresses manner of motion optionally. English, in contrast, has many manner verbs (e.g., run, jog) and expresses path in prepositional phrases (e.g., out of the barn). The way in which a language encodes an event is known as its lexicalization pattern or bias. Using a written sentence elicitation task, we asked whether adult Spanish learners whose L1 was English adopted Spanish lexicalization biases, and what types of L2 exposure facilitated the learning of lexicalization biases...
2016: Language Learning and Development: the Official Journal of the Society for Language Development
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