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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24330862/epic3-national-evidence-based-guidelines-for-preventing-healthcare-associated-infections-in-nhs-hospitals-in-england
#1
H P Loveday, J A Wilson, R J Pratt, M Golsorkhi, A Tingle, A Bak, J Browne, J Prieto, M Wilcox, UK Department of Health
National evidence-based guidelines for preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England were originally commissioned by the Department of Health and developed during 1998-2000 by a nurse-led multi-professional team of researchers and specialist clinicians. Following extensive consultation, they were first published in January 2001(1) and updated in 2007.(2) A cardinal feature of evidence-based guidelines is that they are subject to timely review in order that new research evidence and technological advances can be identified, appraised and, if shown to be effective for the prevention of HCAI, incorporated into amended guidelines...
January 2014: Journal of Hospital Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21702355/reducing-infection-associated-with-central-venous-access-devices
#2
Katie Scales
Catheter-related bloodstream infection is a recognised complication associated with central venous access devices, and increases patient morbidity and mortality. The national evidence-based epic2 guidelines remain the most comprehensive guidance on the prevention of infection associated with central venous access devices. This article discusses how evidence-based care can reduce the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection.
May 11, 2011: Nursing Standard
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20220645/central-venous-access-devices-part-1-devices-for-acute-care
#3
REVIEW
Katie Scales
This two-part article provides an overview of central venous access devices (CVADs) for acute and longer-term use. Part 1 reviews the classifications of vascular access devices before focusing on CVADs for the acute care setting. The rationale for selecting the central route is explained. Clinical indications for the use of CVADs in acute care are discussed and an overview of the related therapies is provided. The practical procedure for insertion of an acute care CVAD is explained using a step-by-step approach...
January 28, 2010: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/18361387/skin-antisepsis-using-2-chlorhexidine-gluconate-in-70-isopropyl-alcohol
#4
REVIEW
Sheila Inwood
The insertion of peripheral and central venous access devices carries a high risk of healthcare-associated infection. One of the main risks of this procedure is the introduction of microorganisms from the patient's own skin. To combat this, and to reduce the rates of healthcare-associated infection, effective skin antisepsis using 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) has been recommended by the epic2: National Evidence-Based Guidelines for Preventing Healthcare-Associated Infections in NHS Hospitals in England (Pratt et al, 2007)...
December 13, 2007: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17505372/skin-antiseptics-used-prior-to-intravascular-catheter-insertion
#5
REVIEW
Debra Adams, T S J Elliot
The recent epic2 publication (Pratt et al, 2007) provides evidence-based guidelines for the prevention of healthcare-associated infections. One of the new recommendations related to the prevention of central venous catheter (CVC) associated infection states that 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% isopropyl alcohol (IPA) should be used for cutaneous antisepsis prior to device insertion. This article reviews cutaneous antisepsis prior to intravascular catheter placement.
March 8, 2007: British Journal of Nursing: BJN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17307562/epic2-national-evidence-based-guidelines-for-preventing-healthcare-associated-infections-in-nhs-hospitals-in-england
#6
R J Pratt, C M Pellowe, J A Wilson, H P Loveday, P J Harper, S R L J Jones, C McDougall, M H Wilcox
National evidence-based guidelines for preventing healthcare-associated infections (HCAI) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England were commissioned by the Department of Health (DH) and developed during 1998-2000 by a nurse-led multi-professional team of researchers and specialist clinicians. Following extensive consultation, they were published in January 2001. These guidelines describe the precautions healthcare workers should take in three areas: standard principles for preventing HCAI, which include hospital environmental hygiene, hand hygiene, the use of personal protective equipment, and the safe use and disposal of sharps; preventing infections associated with the use of short-term indwelling urethral catheters; and preventing infections associated with central venous catheters...
February 2007: Journal of Hospital Infection
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17085509/a-phytophthora-infestans-cystatin-like-protein-targets-a-novel-tomato-papain-like-apoplastic-protease
#7
Miaoying Tian, Joe Win, Jing Song, Renier van der Hoorn, Esther van der Knaap, Sophien Kamoun
There is emerging evidence that the proteolytic machinery of plants plays important roles in defense against pathogens. The oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans, the agent of the devastating late blight disease of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) and potato (Solanum tuberosum), has evolved an arsenal of protease inhibitors to overcome the action of host proteases. Previously, we described a family of 14 Kazal-like extracellular serine protease inhibitors from P. infestans. Among these, EPI1 and EPI10 bind and inhibit the pathogenesis-related (PR) P69B subtilisin-like serine protease of tomato...
January 2007: Plant Physiology
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