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Functional neurologist

Rachel Newby, Jane Alty, Peter Kempster
Mind-brain dualism has dominated historical commentary on dystonia, a dichotomous approach that has left our conceptual grasp of it stubbornly incomplete. This is particularly true of functional dystonia, most diagnostically challenging of all functional movement disorders, in which the question of inherent psychogenicity remains a focus of debate. Phenomenological signs considered in isolation lack the specificity to distinguish organic and nonorganic forms, and dystonia's variability has frustrated attempts to develop objective laboratory-supported standards...
October 18, 2016: Movement Disorders: Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
Alessandro Didonna, Puneet Opal
Importance: The hereditary progressive ataxias comprise genetic disorders that affect the cerebellum and its connections. Even though these diseases historically have been among the first familial disorders of the nervous system to have been recognized, progress in the field has been challenging because of the large number of ataxic genetic syndromes, many of which overlap in their clinical features. Observations: We have taken a historical approach to demonstrate how our knowledge of the genetic basis of ataxic disorders has come about by novel techniques in gene sequencing and bioinformatics...
October 17, 2016: JAMA Neurology
Jacob Taylor, William S Anderson, Jason Brandt, Zoltan Mari, Gregory M Pontone
Although Parkinson disease (PD) is defined clinically by its motor symptoms, it is increasingly recognized that much of the disability and worsened quality of life experienced by patients with PD is attributable to psychiatric symptoms. The authors describe a model of multidisciplinary care that enables these symptoms to be effectively managed. They describe neuropsychiatric complications of PD itself and pharmacologic and neurostimulation treatments for parkinsonian motor symptoms and discuss the management of these complications...
September 3, 2016: American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry
Neeraj Nagpal
Physicians and Internists in India have tended to brush under the carpet legal issues affecting their profession. Of concern to all Physicians is the judgment in a recent case where the NCDRC has stated that if MD Medicine Physicians write Physician & Cardiologist on their letterhead it is Quackery. What is MD Medicine degree holder in India qualified and trained to treat ? These are issues which need debate and that can only be initiated once we recognize that there is a problem. Either an MD Medicine is a cardiologist or he is not...
February 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
L H Goldstein, J D C Mellers
The management of patients with functional neurologic disorders poses many challenges. Psychologic treatments may well start at the point of delivery of the diagnosis, when careful explanations about the nature of the disorder have to be given to the patient and possibly also relatives/carers. Different conceptual models may assist in explaining the factors underlying the presentation, two of which (functional and dissociative) are briefly outlined here. The challenges for neurologists and psychiatrists of delivering a psychologic formulation as part of the diagnosis delivery are considered, along with the importance of clear communication between professionals involved in the patient's care...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
C Bass, P Halligan
Interest in malingering has grown in recent years, and is reflected in the exponential increase in academic publications since 1990. Although malingering is more commonly detected in medicolegal practice, it is not an all-or-nothing presentation and moreover can vary in the extent of presentation. As a nonmedical disorder, the challenge for clinical practice remains that malingering by definition is intentional and deliberate. As such, clinical skills alone are often insufficient to detect it and we describe psychometric tests such as symptom validity tests and relevant nonmedical investigations...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
M Dieterich, J P Staab, T Brandt
Functional and psychiatric disorders that cause vestibular symptoms (i.e., vertigo, unsteadiness, and dizziness) are common. In fact, they are more common than many well-known structural vestibular disorders. Neurologists and otologists are more likely to encounter patients with vestibular symptoms due to persistent postural-perceptual dizziness or panic disorder than Ménière's disease or bilateral vestibular loss. Successful approaches to identifying functional and psychiatric causes of vestibular symptoms can be incorporated into existing practices without much difficulty...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
M Dattilo, V Biousse, B B Bruce, N J Newman
Nonorganic visual loss (NOVL) is the cause of a large number of referrals to neurologists and ophthalmologists and is a frequent area of overlap between neurologists, ophthalmologists, and psychiatrists. NOVL is the presence of visual impairment without an organic cause for disease despite a thorough and comprehensive investigation. A diagnosis of NOVL requires both the absence of any findings on examination and proof of the integrity and functioning of the visual system. Although sometimes a challenging diagnosis to make, there are a number of techniques and maneuvers which can be utilized fairly easily, either at the bedside or in the clinic, to help determine if a patient has NOVL...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Stone
The history of functional neurologic disorders in the 20th century from the point of view of the neurologist is U-shaped. A flurry of interest between the 1880s and early 1920s gave way to lack of interest, skepticism, and concern about misdiagnosis. This was mirrored by increasing professional and geographic divisions between neurology and psychiatry after the First World War. In the 1990s the advent of imaging and other technology highlighted the positive nature of a functional diagnosis. Having been closer in the early 20th century but later more separate, these disorders are now once again the subject of academic and clinical interest, although arguably still very much on the fringes of neurology and neuropsychiatry...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
C G Goetz
Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the 19th-century's premier international neurologist. One of his areas of focused interest was the neurologic disorder, hysteria, a condition with distinctive neurologic signs, but no established structural lesions identified at autopsy. Charcot considered hysteria as a physiologic disorder that affected specific neuroanatomic areas of the brain comparable to the same areas that were damaged by structural neurologic disorders provoking the same or similar signs. He considered hysteria primarily a hereditary disorder, but environmental factors including physical and emotional stress served as provoking factors...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Emanuele D'Amico, Aurora Zanghì, Francesco Patti, Mario Zappia
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease of the central nervous system with unknown etiology. It could be associated with severe disability and losses of physical, psychological and social role functioning over time. People with MS share experiences in common with people affected by diseases with a shorter and clearer terminal phase. Therefore, it is appropriate to offer a palliative care approach to people with severe MS and their caregivers. Areas covered: Benefits for severe MS patients and their caregivers were shown when palliative care was included in their care...
October 8, 2016: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Jeffrey M Ellenbogen
Sleep medicine can be a particularly rewarding clinical area for neurologists. After all, the driving organ of sleep is the brain. Many of the sleep disorders are primary brain disorders, whereas other sleep disorders (and their medications) influence brain function. But without an organized approach, even the engaged and motivated neurologist can easily become frustrated when dealing with patients whose concerns center on an undesirable degree of sleepiness. Lost in the thicket of information provided during the patient-doctor encounter, many physicians are unable to direct the history toward particular diagnostic hypotheses...
October 2016: Seminars in Neurology
Ran Sun, Xiao-Yan Peng, Qi-Sheng You, Li-Qun Jiao, Da-Chuan Liu
A 70 year old male was diagnosed with carotid stenosis and underwent carotid artery stenting (CAS). Severe postoperative complications arose subsequent to the procedure, including decreased visual acuity and symptoms of a visual field defect, and the patient was eventually diagnosed with retinal artery embolism. CAS reduces carotid plaque; however, the subsequent shedding of carotid plaque may cause retinal artery embolism, resulting in the serious loss of visual function in patients. This complication is of paramount importance and requires great consideration from the neurologist and the patients undergoing CAS...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Emily Johnson, Yousef Hannawi, Nirma Carballido Martinez, Eva K Ritzl
Cefepime has been associated with encephalopathy and with nonconvulsive seizure activity, primarily in patients with renal impairment. Here, we report a case of cefepime-associated encephalopathy in a patient with normal renal function with stimulus-induced rhythmic activity seen on electroencephalogram, which resolved on discontinuation of cefepime. We bring this to the attention of the neurohospitalist community, as cefepime is widely used in the hospital setting, and cefepime-related neurotoxicity may go overlooked, especially in patients with normal renal function...
October 2016: Neurohospitalist
R K W Schwarting, S Busse
When parts of the brain suffer from damage, certain functional deficits or impairments are the expected and typical outcome. A myriad of examples show such negative consequences, which afford the daily tasks of neurologists, neuropsychologists, and also behavioral neuroscientists working with experimental brain lesions. Compared to lesion-induced deficits, examples for functional enhancements or facilitation after brain lesions are rather rare and usually not well studied. Here, the mammalian hippocampus seems to provide an exception, since substantial evidence shows that its damage can have facilitatory behavioral effects under certain conditions...
September 28, 2016: Behavioural Brain Research
Alexis Schnitzler, François Genêt, Claire Jourdan, Loic Josserand, Philippe Azouvi
OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of joint stiffness following stroke is not known. Post-stroke spasticity is considered to be an important contributing factor to disability. MATERIALS/PATIENTS AND METHODS: To evaluate the prevalence of joint stiffness in persons with a history of stroke in the whole French population, and the impact of joint stiffness on function. METHODS: The "Disability Health" survey was carried out in people's homes (DHH) and in institutions (DHI) in France...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Ammar Al-Chalabi, Orla Hardiman, Matthew C Kiernan, Adriano Chiò, Benjamin Rix-Brooks, Leonard H van den Berg
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects upper and lower motor neurons, but also frontotemporal and other regions of the brain. The extent to which each neuronal population is affected varies between individuals. The subsequent patterns of disease progression form the basis of diagnostic criteria and phenotypic classification systems, with considerable overlap in the clinical terms used. This overlap can lead to confusion between diagnosis and phenotype...
October 2016: Lancet Neurology
Kiran Maski, Judith A Owens
Sleep problems are frequently encountered as presenting complaints in child neurology clinical practice. They can affect the functioning and quality of life of children, particularly those with primary neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders, since coexisting sleep problems can add substantially to neurocognitive and behavioural comorbidities. Additionally, symptoms of some sleep disorders such as parasomnias and narcolepsy can be confused with those of other neurological disorders (eg, epilepsy), posing diagnostic challenges for paediatric neurologists...
October 2016: Lancet Neurology
Gavin Giovannoni, Helmut Butzkueven, Suhayl Dhib-Jalbut, Jeremy Hobart, Gisela Kobelt, George Pepper, Maria Pia Sormani, Christoph Thalheim, Anthony Traboulsee, Timothy Vollmer
INTRODUCTION: We present international consensus recommendations for improving diagnosis, management and treatment access in multiple sclerosis (MS). Our vision is that these will be used widely among those committed to creating a better future for people with MS and their families. METHODS: Structured discussions and literature searches conducted in 2015 examined the personal and economic impact of MS, current practice in diagnosis, treatment and management, definitions of disease activity and barriers to accessing disease-modifying therapies (DMTs)...
September 2016: Multiple Sclerosis and related Disorders
J P Staab
Behavioral factors have long been recognized as affecting spatial orientation and balance function. Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic studies conducted worldwide over the last 30 years have substantially advanced our knowledge about the inherently strong connectivity among threat/anxiety, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory systems in the brain. Clinical investigations have shed greater light on the nature of functional and psychiatric disorders that manifest or magnify vestibular morbidity. Concepts of these syndromes have changed over 150 years...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
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