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Current Research in Neurology

Bin Lin, Heng Yu, Yuting Lin, Chao Cai, Huoquan Lu, Xinbo Zhu
The aim of the present study was to assess the neuroprotective effects of tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) in a mouse model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and to investigate the involvement of Golgi reassembly and stacking protein 65 (GRASP65) and the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway. Cerebral I/R injury was induced using the Pulsinelli four‑vessel occlusion method. After 5 min of reperfusion, mice received THC (5, 10 or 25 mg/kg) or saline by intraperitoneal injection...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Medicine Reports
Michael Martin, Heiner Fangerau, Axel Karenberg
BACKGROUND: This paper summarizes the current state of research into the role of German neurology during National Socialism (NS) on the basis of extensive secondary literature and key original sources. SUMMARY: As early as 1933, many neurologists and neuroscientists who had been branded as 'non-Aryan' and/or politically persecuted had to leave Germany, were driven to suicide or killed in concentration camps. Two years later, the regulatory merger with the Psychiatrists' Association caused the cautious attempts of the institutionally hampered discipline for autonomy to end in complete failure...
October 16, 2016: European Neurology
Michael W Collins, Anthony P Kontos, David O Okonkwo, Jon Almquist, Julian Bailes, Mark Barisa, Jeffrey Bazarian, O Josh Bloom, David Brody, Robert Cantu, Javier Cardenas, Jay Clugston, Randall Cohen, Ruben Echemendia, R J Elbin, Richard Ellenbogen, Janna Fonseca, Gerard Gioia, Kevin Guskiewicz, Robert Heyer, Gillian Hotz, Grant L Iverson, Barry Jordan, Geoffrey Manley, Joseph Maroon, Thomas McAllister, Michael McCrea, Anne Mucha, Elizabeth Pieroth, Kenneth Podell, Matthew Pombo, Teena Shetty, Allen Sills, Gary Solomon, Danny G Thomas, Tamara C Valovich McLeod, Tony Yates, Ross Zafonte
BACKGROUND: Conventional management for concussion involves prescribed rest and progressive return to activity. Recent evidence challenges this notion and suggests that active approaches may be effective for some patients. Previous concussion consensus statements provide limited guidance regarding active treatment. OBJECTIVE: To describe the current landscape of treatment for concussion and to provide summary agreements related to treatment to assist clinicians in the treatment of concussion...
October 12, 2016: Neurosurgery
Robert S Miletich
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are now available for routine clinical applications in neurology. This article discusses their diagnostic use in dementia, brain tumors, epilepsy, parkinsonism, cerebrovascular disease, and traumatic brain injury. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuromolecular imaging, also known as nuclear neurology, involves clinical imaging of both basal regional physiology (perfusion, metabolism, and transport mechanisms) and specific neurochemical physiology (currently, only the dopamine transporter)...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Christina L Szperka, Amy A Gelfand, Andrew D Hershey
OBJECTIVE: To describe current patterns of use of nerve blocks and trigger point injections for treatment of pediatric headache. BACKGROUND: Peripheral nerve blocks are often used to treat headaches in adults and children, but the available studies and practice data from adult headache specialists have shown wide variability in diagnostic indications, sites injected, and medication(s) used. The purpose of this study was to describe current practice patterns in the use of nerve blocks and trigger point injections for pediatric headache disorders...
October 12, 2016: Headache
Abinaya Chandrasekaran, Hasan X Avci, Marcel Leist, Julianna Kobolák, Andras Dinnyés
Astrocytes have a central role in brain development and function, and so have gained increasing attention over the past two decades. Consequently, our knowledge about their origin, differentiation and function has increased significantly, with new research showing that astrocytes cultured alone or co-cultured with neurons have the potential to improve our understanding of various central nervous system diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, or Alexander disease. The generation of astrocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) opens up a new area for studying neurologic diseases in vitro; these models could be exploited to identify and validate potential drugs by detecting adverse effects in the early stages of drug development...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Abdelrahman Ibrahim Abushouk, Ahmed Negida, Hussien Ahmed
The current outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in South America is one of the most serious public health emergencies since the Ebola outbreak of West Africa [2014]. ZIKV belongs to the flaviviridae family and has two lineages (Asian and African). The virus was first discovered in Uganda [1947] and the first human infection was identified in Nigeria [1952]. The current epidemic is the third of its type after that of Yap Island, Micronesia [2007] and French Polynesia [2013]. Phylogenetic studies revealed that the current strain shares about 99...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Clinical Virology: the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology
T R J Nicholson, V Voon
Functional neurologic disorder (FND), also known as conversion disorder, is common and often associated with a poor prognosis. It has been relatively neglected by research and as such there is a conspicuous lack of evidence-based treatments. Physical and psychologic therapies are the main treatment modalities, over and above reassurance and sensitive explanation of the diagnosis. However there are two other historic treatments that have seen a recent resurgence of interest and use. The first is electric stimulation, which was initially pioneered with direct stimulation of nerves but now used indirectly (and therefore noninvasively) in the form of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
J Stone
The history of functional neurologic disorders in the 20th century from the point of view of the neurologist is U-shaped. A flurry of interest between the 1880s and early 1920s gave way to lack of interest, skepticism, and concern about misdiagnosis. This was mirrored by increasing professional and geographic divisions between neurology and psychiatry after the First World War. In the 1990s the advent of imaging and other technology highlighted the positive nature of a functional diagnosis. Having been closer in the early 20th century but later more separate, these disorders are now once again the subject of academic and clinical interest, although arguably still very much on the fringes of neurology and neuropsychiatry...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
T Frodl
Advances in neuropsychiatric research are supposed to lead to significant improvements in understanding functional neurologic disorders and their diagnosis. However, epigenetic and genetic research on conversion disorders and somatoform disorders is only at its start. This review demonstrates the current state within this field and tries to bridge a gap from what is known on gene-stress interactions in other psychiatric disorders like depression. The etiology of conversion disorders is hypothesized to be multifactorial...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
K Roelofs, J Pasman
Conversion disorder (CD) has traditionally been ascribed to psychologic factors such as trauma, stress, or emotional conflict. Although reference to the psychologic origin of CD has been removed from the criteria list in DSM-5, many theories still incorporate CD as originating from adverse events. This chapter provides a critical review of the literature on stressful life events in CD and discusses current cognitive and neurobiologic models linking psychologic stressors with conversion symptomatology. In addition, we propose a neurobiologic stress model integrating those cognitive models with neuroendocrine stress research and propose that stress and stress-induced changes in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function may result in cognitive alterations, that in turn contribute to experiencing conversion symptoms...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
M Merino-Andreu, A Alvarez-Ruiz de Larrinaga, J A Madrid-Perez, M A Martinez-Martinez, F J Puertas-Cuesta, A J Asencio-Guerra, O Romero Santo-Tomas, M J Jurado-Luque, F J Segarra-Isern, T Canet-Sanz, P Gimenez-Rodriguez, J Teran-Santos, M L Alonso-Alvarez, D Garcia-Borreguero Diaz-Varela, B Barriuso-Esteban
One of the main objectives of the Spanish Sleep Society is to promote healthy sleep in both the general population and in health professionals. This document aims to conduct a review of the current scientific literature on sleep habits that can serve as the basis on which to establish a set of general recommendations, regarding healthy sleep, for use by the general population in Spain as well as to identify the main challenges faced by research into sleep habits. The document has been developed by a multidisciplinary team made up of members of the Spanish Sleep Society who are experts in paediatric sleep medicine, clinical neurophysiology, pulmonology, neurology, chronobiology, physiology and psychology...
October 3, 2016: Revista de Neurologia
Irene Gonsalvez, Roey Baror, Peter Fried, Emiliano Santarnecchi, Alvaro Pascual-Leone
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a looming public health crisis that currently lacks an effective treatment. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (NBS), particularly transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), offers a promising alternative approach to pharmacological interventions for an increasing number of neurological and psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is summarize data from therapeutic trials of NBS in AD and other dementing illnesses. Despite the potential of NBS, there is limited theoretical framework and a lack of guidelines for its applications to AD...
September 30, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Carolyn E Wilshire, Tony Ward
In some patients with chronic physical complaints, detailed examination fails to reveal a well-recognized underlying disease process. In this situation, the physician may suspect a psychological cause. In this review, we critically evaluated the evidence for this causal claim, focusing on complaints presenting as neurological disorders. There were four main conclusions. First, patients with these complaints frequently exhibit psychopathology but not consistently more often than patients with a comparable "organic" diagnosis, so a causal role cannot be inferred...
September 2016: Perspectives on Psychological Science: a Journal of the Association for Psychological Science
Brenda Hartman, Mary Donnelly-VanderLoo, Tiffany Watson, Colleen O'Connor, Janet Madill
The risk for impaired vitamin B12 status increases with age, as does the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Long-term use of PPIs is associated with several nutritional deficiencies including B12. Currently, there are no recommendations for B12 screening among patients taking PPIs. Data were abstracted on B12 concentrations, B12-containing supplement use, medications, and select hematological values from a retrospective chart review of 658 adults, 391 with serum B12 concentrations, admitted to 6 different medical units at 2 regional hospitals in Southwestern Ontario between 2010 and 2012...
June 23, 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
J Fluss, M Dinomais, M Kossotoroff, C Vuillerot, S Darteyre, S Chabrier
Over the last decade considerable advances have been made in the identification, understanding and management of pediatric arterial ischemic stroke. Such increasing knowledge has also brought new perspectives and interrogations in the current acute and rehabilitative care of these patients. Areas covered: In developed countries, focal cerebral arteriopathy is one of the most common causes of arterial ischemic stroke in childhood and imaging features are well characterized. However, there are ongoing debates regarding its underlying mechanisms, natural evolution and proper management...
October 12, 2016: Expert Review of Neurotherapeutics
Alberto Luis Fernandez, Aldo Ferreres, Alejandra Morlett-Paredes, Diego Rivera, Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla
OBJECTIVE: To describe the history, current situation, and future challenges of Argentinian neuropsychology. METHOD: A brief historical description highlighting the most representative authors and publications is made. In addition, a survey was administered to a sample of 135 neuropsychologists practicing neuropsychology in Argentina. The survey explored the current neuropsychological practices among the respondents. RESULTS: Results show that most Argentinian neuropsychologists are: psychologists, women, and work in the clinical field in the country's major cities...
August 10, 2016: Clinical Neuropsychologist
Jayden A Clark, Elise J Yeaman, Catherine A Blizzard, Jyoti A Chuckowree, Tracey C Dickson
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an aggressive multifactorial disease converging on a common pathology: the degeneration of motor neurons (MNs), their axons and neuromuscular synapses. This vulnerability and dysfunction of MNs highlights the dependency of these large cells on their intracellular machinery. Neuronal microtubules (MTs) are intracellular structures that facilitate a myriad of vital neuronal functions, including activity dependent axonal transport. In ALS, it is becoming increasingly apparent that MTs are likely to be a critical component of this disease...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
H Kafa, J T-W Wang, K T Al-Jamal
The recent advances in nanotechnology have allowed new fields of research to investigate cutting edge brain-specific therapies and to tackle the complex brain-related disorders. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain resulting in only few drugs reaching the market to tackle brain disorders. Nanoparticles (NPs) provide a flexible platform for conjugating drugs and targeting ligands and have been extensively researched to facilitate BBB crossing and effective delivery to the brain...
2016: International Review of Neurobiology
A Lalatsa, E Barbu
Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing...
2016: International Review of Neurobiology
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