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Zooarchaeology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29915348/the-emergence-of-animal-management-in-the-southern-levant
#1
Natalie D Munro, Guy Bar-Oz, Jacqueline S Meier, Lidar Sapir-Hen, Mary C Stiner, Reuven Yeshurun
Our compilation of zooarchaeological data from a series of important archaeological sites spanning the Epipaleolithic through Pre-Pottery Neolithic B periods in the Mediterranean Hills of the southern Levant contributes to major debates about the beginnings of ungulate management in Southwest Asia. The data support an onset of ungulate management practices by the Early PPNB (10,500-10,000 cal. BP), more than 500 years earlier than previously thought for this region. There is a clear developmental connection between reduced hunting intensity and the uptake of ungulate management, confirming that this process began in response to local, density-dependent demographic factors...
June 18, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29862544/hindlimb-bone-maturation-during-postnatal-life-in-the-greater-rhea-rhea-americana-aves-palaeognathae-implications-for-palaeobiological-and-zooarchaeological-interpretations
#2
Mariana B J Picasso, Claudio Gustavo Barbeito
The objective of this study was to study the morphological pattern of bone maturation of the hindlimb bones of Rhea americana and find out how it can affect bone morphology after a taphonomic process. Juvenile specimens (n = 10) ranging from one month old to eight months old were studied. For comparison, bones from adults and juveniles from museum specimens (n = 4 and n = 6, respectively) were studied. In fresh bones, ossification centres were identified in the proximal and distal epiphyses of the tibiotarsi and in the proximal epiphysis of the tarsometatarsi, whereas the distal region of the femora and tarsometatarsi showed abundance of cartilage...
June 3, 2018: Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738619/prioritizing-sites-for-conservation-based-on-similarity-to-historical-baselines-and-feasibility-of-protection
#3
Traci Popejoy, Charles R Randklev, Thomas M Neeson, Caryn C Vaughn
The shifting baseline syndrome concept advocates for the use of historical knowledge to inform conservation baselines, but does not address the feasibility of restoring sites to those baselines. In many regions, conservation feasibility varies among sites due to differences in resource availability, statutory power, and land-owner participation. We use zooarchaeological records to identify a historical baseline of the freshwater mussel community's composition before Euro-American influence at a river-reach scale...
May 8, 2018: Conservation Biology: the Journal of the Society for Conservation Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29685752/dental-calculus-indicates-widespread-plant-use-within-the-stable-neanderthal-dietary-niche
#4
Robert C Power, Domingo C Salazar-García, Mauro Rubini, Andrea Darlas, Katerina Harvati, Michael Walker, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Amanda G Henry
The ecology of Neanderthals is a pressing question in the study of hominin evolution. Diet appears to have played a prominent role in their adaptation to Eurasia. Based on isotope and zooarchaeological studies, Neanderthal diet has been reconstructed as heavily meat-based and generally similar across different environments. This image persists, despite recent studies suggesting more plant use and more variation. However, we have only a fragmentary picture of their dietary ecology, and how it may have varied among habitats, because we lack broad and environmentally representative information about their use of plants and other foods...
June 2018: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29568045/tracing-intensive-fish-and-meat-consumption-using-zn-isotope-ratios-evidence-from-a-historical-breton-population-rennes-france
#5
Klervia Jaouen, Rozenn Colleter, Anita Pietrzak, Marie-Laure Pons, Benoît Clavel, Norbert Telmon, Éric Crubézy, Jean-Jacques Hublin, Michael P Richards
Here we report Sr and Zn isotope ratios of teeth of medieval to early modern Breton people a population whose diet is known from historical, archeological and collagen isotope data. Most of the population, buried in the Dominican convent of Rennes, France, consists of parliamentary nobles, wealthy commoners and ecclesiastics, who had a diet rich in animal products. Our aim is to assess how the Zn isotope ratios of their teeth compare to those of other French historical populations previously studied, which were characterized by cereal-based diets, and those of modern French individuals, who daily eat animal products...
March 22, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29447760/climatic-controls-on-later-stone-age-human-adaptation-in-africa-s-southern-cape
#6
Brian M Chase, J Tyler Faith, Alex Mackay, Manuel Chevalier, Andrew S Carr, Arnoud Boom, Sophak Lim, Paula J Reimer
Africa's southern Cape is a key region for the evolution of our species, with early symbolic systems, marine faunal exploitation, and episodic production of microlithic stone tools taken as evidence for the appearance of distinctively complex human behavior. However, the temporally discontinuous nature of this evidence precludes ready assumptions of intrinsic adaptive benefit, and has encouraged diverse explanations for the occurrence of these behaviors, in terms of regional demographic, social and ecological conditions...
January 2018: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29446556/the-origins-and-early-elaboration-of-projectile-technology
#7
Corey A O'Driscoll, Jessica C Thompson
The ability of Homo sapiens to kill prey at a distance is arguably one of the catalysts for our current ecological dominance. Many researchers have suggested its origins lie in the African Middle Stone Age or the European Middle Palaeolithic (∼300-30 thousand years ago), but the perishable components of armatures rarely preserve. Most research on this subject therefore emphasises analysis of armature tip size, shape, and diagnostic impacts or residues. Other lines of evidence have included human skeletal anatomy or analyses of the species composition of faunal assemblages...
January 2018: Evolutionary Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29438388/ancient-dna-analysis-of-indigenous-rockfish-use-on-the-pacific-coast-implications-for-marine-conservation-areas-and-fisheries-management
#8
Antonia T Rodrigues, Iain McKechnie, Dongya Y Yang
Rockfish (Sebastes spp.) are a common marine fish in nearshore and continental shelf environments in the North Pacific Ocean. They are frequently identified in coastal archaeological sites in western North America; however, the morphological similarity of rockfish species limits conventional zooarchaeological identifications to the genus level. This study applies ancient DNA analysis to 96 archaeological rockfish specimens from four sites on separate islands in an archipelago on western Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29348633/contrasting-patterns-of-prehistoric-human-diet-and-subsistence-in-northernmost-europe
#9
Mirva Pääkkönen, Auli Bläuer, Bjørnar Olsen, Richard P Evershed, Henrik Asplund
Current archaeological evidence indicates the transition from hunting-fishing-gathering to agriculture in Northern Europe was a gradual process. This transition was especially complex in the prehistoric North Fennoscandian landscape where the high latitude posed a challenge to both domestic animal breeding and cereal cultivation. The conditions varied, the coastal dwellers had access to rich marine resources and enjoyed a milder climate due to the Gulf Stream, while those living in the inland Boreal forest zone faced longer and colder winters and less diversity in animal and plant resources...
January 18, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29167363/long-term-archives-reveal-shifting-extinction-selectivity-in-china-s-postglacial-mammal-fauna
#10
Samuel T Turvey, Jennifer J Crees, Zhipeng Li, Jon Bielby, Jing Yuan
Ecosystems have been modified by human activities for millennia, and insights about ecology and extinction risk based only on recent data are likely to be both incomplete and biased. We synthesize multiple long-term archives (over 250 archaeological and palaeontological sites dating from the early Holocene to the Ming Dynasty and over 4400 historical records) to reconstruct the spatio-temporal dynamics of Holocene-modern range change across China, a megadiverse country experiencing extensive current-day biodiversity loss, for 34 mammal species over three successive postglacial time intervals...
November 29, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29109249/hominid-butchers-and-biting-crocodiles-in-the-african-plio-pleistocene
#11
Yonatan Sahle, Sireen El Zaatari, Tim D White
Zooarchaeologists have long relied on linear traces and pits found on the surfaces of ancient bones to infer ancient hominid behaviors such as slicing, chopping, and percussive actions during butchery of mammal carcasses. However, such claims about Plio-Pleistocene hominids rely mostly on very small assemblages of bony remains. Furthermore, recent experiments on trampling animals and biting crocodiles have shown each to be capable of producing mimics of such marks. This equifinality-the creation of similar products by different processes-makes deciphering early archaeological bone assemblages difficult...
December 12, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29045476/spread-of-domestic-animals-across-neolithic-western-anatolia-new-zooarchaeological-evidence-from-u%C3%A4-urlu-h%C3%A3-y%C3%A3-k-the-island-of-g%C3%A3-k%C3%A3-eada-turkey
#12
Levent Atici, Suzanne E Pilaar Birch, Burçin Erdoğu
The zooarchaeological research presented here investigates Neolithic and Chalcolithic (ca. 6500-5000 cal. BC) animal exploitation strategies at Uğurlu Höyük on the Turkish island of Gökçeada in the northeastern Aegean Sea. Toward this end, we first discuss the results of our analysis of the zooarchaeological assemblages from Uğurlu Höyük and then consider the data within a wider regional explanatory framework using a diachronic approach, comparing them with those from western and northwestern Anatolian sites...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28979085/dietary-diversity-on-the-swahili-coast-the-fauna-from-two-zanzibar-trading-locales
#13
M E Prendergast, E M Quintana Morales, A Crowther, M C Horton, N L Boivin
Occupants of coastal and island eastern Africa-now known as the 'Swahili coast'-were involved in long-distance trade with the Indian Ocean world during the later first millennium CE. Such exchanges may be traced via the appearance of non-native animals in the archaeofaunal record; additionally, this record reveals daily culinary practises of the members of trading communities and can thus shed light on subsistence technologies and social organisation. Yet despite the potential contributions of faunal data to Swahili coast archaeology, few detailed zooarchaeological studies have been conducted...
July 2017: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874524/direct-dating-of-neanderthal-remains-from-the-site-of-vindija-cave-and-implications-for-the-middle-to-upper-paleolithic-transition
#14
Thibaut Devièse, Ivor Karavanić, Daniel Comeskey, Cara Kubiak, Petra Korlević, Mateja Hajdinjak, Siniša Radović, Noemi Procopio, Michael Buckley, Svante Pääbo, Tom Higham
Previous dating of the Vi-207 and Vi-208 Neanderthal remains from Vindija Cave (Croatia) led to the suggestion that Neanderthals survived there as recently as 28,000-29,000 B.P. Subsequent dating yielded older dates, interpreted as ages of at least ∼32,500 B.P. We have redated these same specimens using an approach based on the extraction of the amino acid hydroxyproline, using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (Prep-HPLC). This method is more efficient in eliminating modern contamination in the bone collagen...
October 3, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28867279/investigating-hominin-carnivory-in-the-okote-member-of-koobi-fora-kenya-with-an-actualistic-model-of-carcass-consumption-and-traces-of-butchery-on-the-elbow
#15
Stephen R Merritt
Previous zooarchaeological analysis at Koobi Fora indicates that Okote Member hominins were the primary agents of bone assemblage formation, gained early access to large and small mammal flesh, and consumed both high- and low-ranked carcass parts. The discovery of additional butchered specimens prompted the re-analysis presented here of three large and well-preserved zooarchaeological assemblages from the Okote member, GaJi14, FwJj14N and FwJj14S, to revisit paleoecological hypotheses about tool-assisted carnivory...
November 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28817590/reconstructing-asian-faunal-introductions-to-eastern-africa-from-multi-proxy-biomolecular-and-archaeological-datasets
#16
Mary E Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Laurent Frantz, Heidi Eager, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M Quintana Morales, Verena J Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A Dimopoulos, Richard M Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright, Jeremy B Searle, Johannes Krause, Greger Larson, Nicole L Boivin
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological and economic impacts of introduced species...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707706/the-bone-degenerative-processes-in-senile-fishes-from-holocene-brazilian-shell-mounds
#17
O Aguilera, I Rocha, M S Lopes, I Lima, R T Lopes, A S Machado, R B Guimarães, M A C Crapez, M C Tenório, A Nepomuceno
Zooarchaeological collections from shell mounds in Rio de Janeiro (2,470-4,632 cal BP) contain a high prevalence of swollen fish bones belonging to the Atlantic spadefish (Chaetodipterus faber), crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) and fat snook (Centropomus parallelus). Given the lack of knowledge of the bone degenerative process in senile fishes, this study analysed hyperostotic bone in zooarchaeological and modern specimens to obtain high-resolution morphology and microstructure reconstruction. We used microCT as well as X-ray diffraction to characterize the crystallographic changes associated with fish senility...
July 14, 2017: Journal of Fish Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594831/a-morphometric-system-to-distinguish-sheep-and-goat-postcranial-bones
#18
Lenny Salvagno, Umberto Albarella
Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goat is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methodological contributions have been published at different times and by various people to facilitate this task, largely relying on a macro-morphological approach. This is now routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists but, although it certainly has its value, has also been shown to have limitations. Morphological discriminant criteria can vary in different populations and correct identification is highly dependent upon a researcher's experience, availability of appropriate reference collections, and many other factors that are difficult to quantify...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539653/a-second-mortuary-hiatus-on-lake-baikal-in-siberia-and-the-arrival-of-small-scale-pastoralism
#19
Robert J Losey, Andrea L Waters-Rist, Tatiana Nomokonova, Artur A Kharinskii
The spread of pastoralism in Asia is poorly understood, including how such processes affected northern forager populations. Lake Baikal's western shore has a rich Holocene archaeological record that tracks these processes. The Early Bronze Age here is evidenced by numerous forager burials. The Early Iron Age (EIA) is thought to mark the arrival of pastoralists, but archaeological remains from this period have received little analysis. New radiocarbon dates for EIA human remains from 23 cemeteries indicate that no burials were created along this shore for ~900 years...
May 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464354/white-tailed-deer-as-a-taphonomic-agent-photographic-evidence-of-white-tailed-deer-gnawing-on-human-bone
#20
Lauren A Meckel, Chloe P McDaneld, Daniel J Wescott
Ungulate gnawing on bone has been reported in the taphonomic and zooarchaeological literature, but there are no known reports of ungulates altering human remains. Herein, we report on the first known photographic evidence of deer gnawing human remains. As described in nonhuman scavenging literature, forking of the bone characterizes the taphonomic effect of deer gnawing in this case, which is distinct from the effect caused by other scavengers. This type of osteophagia during the winter season is consistent with previously documented behavior of deer gnawing on nonhuman bone, possibly to obtain minerals absent in their diet...
January 2018: Journal of Forensic Sciences
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