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Zooarchaeology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29167363/long-term-archives-reveal-shifting-extinction-selectivity-in-china-s-postglacial-mammal-fauna
#1
Samuel T Turvey, Jennifer J Crees, Zhipeng Li, Jon Bielby, Jing Yuan
Ecosystems have been modified by human activities for millennia, and insights about ecology and extinction risk based only on recent data are likely to be both incomplete and biased. We synthesize multiple long-term archives (over 250 archaeological and palaeontological sites dating from the early Holocene to the Ming Dynasty and over 4400 historical records) to reconstruct the spatio-temporal dynamics of Holocene-modern range change across China, a megadiverse country experiencing extensive current-day biodiversity loss, for 34 mammal species over three successive postglacial time intervals...
November 29, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29109249/hominid-butchers-and-biting-crocodiles-in-the-african-plio-pleistocene
#2
Yonatan Sahle, Sireen El Zaatari, Tim D White
Zooarchaeologists have long relied on linear traces and pits found on the surfaces of ancient bones to infer ancient hominid behaviors such as slicing, chopping, and percussive actions during butchery of mammal carcasses. However, such claims about Plio-Pleistocene hominids rely mostly on very small assemblages of bony remains. Furthermore, recent experiments on trampling animals and biting crocodiles have shown each to be capable of producing mimics of such marks. This equifinality-the creation of similar products by different processes-makes deciphering early archaeological bone assemblages difficult...
November 6, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29045476/spread-of-domestic-animals-across-neolithic-western-anatolia-new-zooarchaeological-evidence-from-u%C3%A4-urlu-h%C3%A3-y%C3%A3-k-the-island-of-g%C3%A3-k%C3%A3-eada-turkey
#3
Levent Atici, Suzanne E Pilaar Birch, Burçin Erdoğu
The zooarchaeological research presented here investigates Neolithic and Chalcolithic (ca. 6500-5000 cal. BC) animal exploitation strategies at Uğurlu Höyük on the Turkish island of Gökçeada in the northeastern Aegean Sea. Toward this end, we first discuss the results of our analysis of the zooarchaeological assemblages from Uğurlu Höyük and then consider the data within a wider regional explanatory framework using a diachronic approach, comparing them with those from western and northwestern Anatolian sites...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28979085/dietary-diversity-on-the-swahili-coast-the-fauna-from-two-zanzibar-trading-locales
#4
M E Prendergast, E M Quintana Morales, A Crowther, M C Horton, N L Boivin
Occupants of coastal and island eastern Africa-now known as the 'Swahili coast'-were involved in long-distance trade with the Indian Ocean world during the later first millennium CE. Such exchanges may be traced via the appearance of non-native animals in the archaeofaunal record; additionally, this record reveals daily culinary practises of the members of trading communities and can thus shed light on subsistence technologies and social organisation. Yet despite the potential contributions of faunal data to Swahili coast archaeology, few detailed zooarchaeological studies have been conducted...
July 2017: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28874524/direct-dating-of-neanderthal-remains-from-the-site-of-vindija-cave-and-implications-for-the-middle-to-upper-paleolithic-transition
#5
Thibaut Devièse, Ivor Karavanić, Daniel Comeskey, Cara Kubiak, Petra Korlević, Mateja Hajdinjak, Siniša Radović, Noemi Procopio, Michael Buckley, Svante Pääbo, Tom Higham
Previous dating of the Vi-207 and Vi-208 Neanderthal remains from Vindija Cave (Croatia) led to the suggestion that Neanderthals survived there as recently as 28,000-29,000 B.P. Subsequent dating yielded older dates, interpreted as ages of at least ∼32,500 B.P. We have redated these same specimens using an approach based on the extraction of the amino acid hydroxyproline, using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (Prep-HPLC). This method is more efficient in eliminating modern contamination in the bone collagen...
October 3, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28867279/investigating-hominin-carnivory-in-the-okote-member-of-koobi-fora-kenya-with-an-actualistic-model-of-carcass-consumption-and-traces-of-butchery-on-the-elbow
#6
Stephen R Merritt
Previous zooarchaeological analysis at Koobi Fora indicates that Okote Member hominins were the primary agents of bone assemblage formation, gained early access to large and small mammal flesh, and consumed both high- and low-ranked carcass parts. The discovery of additional butchered specimens prompted the re-analysis presented here of three large and well-preserved zooarchaeological assemblages from the Okote member, GaJi14, FwJj14N and FwJj14S, to revisit paleoecological hypotheses about tool-assisted carnivory...
November 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28817590/reconstructing-asian-faunal-introductions-to-eastern-africa-from-multi-proxy-biomolecular-and-archaeological-datasets
#7
Mary E Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Laurent Frantz, Heidi Eager, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eriéndira M Quintana Morales, Verena J Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A Dimopoulos, Richard M Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright, Jeremy B Searle, Johannes Krause, Greger Larson, Nicole L Boivin
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological and economic impacts of introduced species...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28707706/the-bone-degenerative-processes-in-senile-fishes-from-holocene-brazilian-shell-mounds
#8
O Aguilera, I Rocha, M S Lopes, I Lima, R T Lopes, A S Machado, R B Guimarães, M A C Crapez, M C Tenório, A Nepomuceno
Zooarchaeological collections from shell mounds in Rio de Janeiro (2,470-4,632 cal BP) contain a high prevalence of swollen fish bones belonging to the Atlantic spadefish (Chaetodipterus faber), crevalle jack (Caranx hippos) and fat snook (Centropomus parallelus). Given the lack of knowledge of the bone degenerative process in senile fishes, this study analysed hyperostotic bone in zooarchaeological and modern specimens to obtain high-resolution morphology and microstructure reconstruction. We used microCT as well as X-ray diffraction to characterize the crystallographic changes associated with fish senility...
July 14, 2017: Journal of Fish Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28594831/a-morphometric-system-to-distinguish-sheep-and-goat-postcranial-bones
#9
Lenny Salvagno, Umberto Albarella
Distinguishing between the bones of sheep and goat is a notorious challenge in zooarchaeology. Several methodological contributions have been published at different times and by various people to facilitate this task, largely relying on a macro-morphological approach. This is now routinely adopted by zooarchaeologists but, although it certainly has its value, has also been shown to have limitations. Morphological discriminant criteria can vary in different populations and correct identification is highly dependent upon a researcher's experience, availability of appropriate reference collections, and many other factors that are difficult to quantify...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28539653/a-second-mortuary-hiatus-on-lake-baikal-in-siberia-and-the-arrival-of-small-scale-pastoralism
#10
Robert J Losey, Andrea L Waters-Rist, Tatiana Nomokonova, Artur A Kharinskii
The spread of pastoralism in Asia is poorly understood, including how such processes affected northern forager populations. Lake Baikal's western shore has a rich Holocene archaeological record that tracks these processes. The Early Bronze Age here is evidenced by numerous forager burials. The Early Iron Age (EIA) is thought to mark the arrival of pastoralists, but archaeological remains from this period have received little analysis. New radiocarbon dates for EIA human remains from 23 cemeteries indicate that no burials were created along this shore for ~900 years...
May 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464354/white-tailed-deer-as-a-taphonomic-agent-photographic-evidence-of-white-tailed-deer-gnawing-on-human-bone
#11
Lauren A Meckel, Chloe P McDaneld, Daniel J Wescott
Ungulate gnawing on bone has been reported in the taphonomic and zooarchaeological literature, but there are no known reports of ungulates altering human remains. Herein, we report on the first known photographic evidence of deer gnawing human remains. As described in nonhuman scavenging literature, forking of the bone characterizes the taphonomic effect of deer gnawing in this case, which is distinct from the effect caused by other scavengers. This type of osteophagia during the winter season is consistent with previously documented behavior of deer gnawing on nonhuman bone, possibly to obtain minerals absent in their diet...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Forensic Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28342040/ancient-parasites-from-endemic-deer-from-cueva-parque-diana-archeological-site-patagonia-argentina
#12
María Ornela Beltrame, Eleonor Tietze, Alberto Enrique Pérez, Agustín Bellusci, Norma Haydée Sardella
The narrow Andean-Patagonian temperate rainforest strip in the west of southern South America is inhabited by two endemic species of cervids, the southern pudu (Pudu puda) and the huemul (Hippocamelus bisulcus), both cataloged as near threatened and threatened species, respectively. One of the possible causes of their declined number is the susceptibility to livestock diseases. Significant zooarchaeological records of both deer have been found throughout the Holocene from Patagonia. The present contribution reports the first paleoparasitological results obtained from coprolites of endemic deer from the archeological site "Cueva Parque Diana," Neuquén Province, Argentina, and discusses the possible diseases found in ancient times...
May 2017: Parasitology Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28316883/middle-pleistocene-protein-sequences-from-the-rhinoceros-genus-stephanorhinus-and-the-phylogeny-of-extant-and-extinct-middle-late-pleistocene-rhinocerotidae
#13
Frido Welker, Geoff M Smith, Jarod M Hutson, Lutz Kindler, Alejandro Garcia-Moreno, Aritza Villaluenga, Elaine Turner, Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser
BACKGROUND: Ancient protein sequences are increasingly used to elucidate the phylogenetic relationships between extinct and extant mammalian taxa. Here, we apply these recent developments to Middle Pleistocene bone specimens of the rhinoceros genus Stephanorhinus. No biomolecular sequence data is currently available for this genus, leaving phylogenetic hypotheses on its evolutionary relationships to extant and extinct rhinoceroses untested. Furthermore, recent phylogenies based on Rhinocerotidae (partial or complete) mitochondrial DNA sequences differ in the placement of the Sumatran rhinoceros (Dicerorhinus sumatrensis)...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28164155/historical-ecology-and-the-conservation-of-large-hermaphroditic-fishes-in-pacific-coast-kelp-forest-ecosystems
#14
Todd J Braje, Torben C Rick, Paul Szpak, Seth D Newsome, Joseph M McCain, Emma A Elliott Smith, Michael Glassow, Scott L Hamilton
The intensive commercial exploitation of California sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) has become a complex, multimillion-dollar industry. The fishery is of concern because of high harvest levels and potential indirect impacts of sheephead removals on the structure and function of kelp forest ecosystems. California sheephead are protogynous hermaphrodites that, as predators of sea urchins and other invertebrates, are critical components of kelp forest ecosystems in the northeast Pacific. Overfishing can trigger trophic cascades and widespread ecological dysfunction when other urchin predators are also lost from the system...
February 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27922064/ancient-tortoise-hunting-in-the-southwest-pacific
#15
Stuart Hawkins, Trevor H Worthy, Stuart Bedford, Matthew Spriggs, Geoffrey Clark, Geoff Irwin, Simon Best, Patrick Kirch
We report the unprecedented Lapita exploitation and subsequent extinction of large megafauna tortoises (?Meiolania damelipi) on tropical islands during the late Holocene over a 281,000 km(2) region of the southwest Pacific spanning from the Vanuatu archipelago to Viti Levu in Fiji. Zooarchaeological analyses have identified seven early archaeological sites with the remains of this distinctive hornless tortoise, unlike the Gondwanan horned meiolaniid radiation to the southwest. These large tortoise radiations in the Pacific may have contributed to the rapid dispersal of early mobile Neolithic hunters throughout southwest Melanesia and on to western Polynesia...
December 6, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27732648/at-the-feet-of-the-fortress-analysis-of-inka-period-ca-ad-1430-1536-archaeofaunal-assemblages-from-residential-unit-1-ru1-pucara-de-tilcara-jujuy-argentina
#16
Carlos Raúl Belotti López de Medina, Lautaro López Geronazzo, Clarisa Otero
This paper reports the results of a zooarchaeological analysis conducted on the occupation layer of a compound structure (Residential Unit 1) of the Pucara de Tilcara archaeological site (Jujuy Province, northwestern Argentina). Its occupation span extends between the 13th and 15th centuries AD, but evidence diagnostic of the Inka Period (AD 1430-1536) is predominant. Residential Unit 1 was a house-workshop that hosted specialized crafts like metallurgy and lapidary during the Inka Period. It was proposed in previous works that artisans living at Pucara de Tilcara were provisioned with agropastoral products by the Inka administration...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27638212/palaeoproteomic-evidence-identifies-archaic-hominins-associated-with-the-ch%C3%A3-telperronian-at-the-grotte-du-renne
#17
Frido Welker, Mateja Hajdinjak, Sahra Talamo, Klervia Jaouen, Michael Dannemann, Francine David, Michèle Julien, Matthias Meyer, Janet Kelso, Ian Barnes, Selina Brace, Pepijn Kamminga, Roman Fischer, Benedikt M Kessler, John R Stewart, Svante Pääbo, Matthew J Collins, Jean-Jacques Hublin
In Western Europe, the Middle to Upper Paleolithic transition is associated with the disappearance of Neandertals and the spread of anatomically modern humans (AMHs). Current chronological, behavioral, and biological models of this transitional period hinge on the Châtelperronian technocomplex. At the site of the Grotte du Renne, Arcy-sur-Cure, morphological Neandertal specimens are not directly dated but are contextually associated with the Châtelperronian, which contains bone points and beads. The association between Neandertals and this "transitional" assemblage has been controversial because of the lack either of a direct hominin radiocarbon date or of molecular confirmation of the Neandertal affiliation...
October 4, 2016: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27616353/shift-of-grey-seal-subspecies-boundaries-in-response-to-climate-culling-and-conservation
#18
Katharina Fietz, Anders Galatius, Jonas Teilmann, Rune Dietz, Anne Kristine Frie, Anastasia Klimova, Per J Palsbøll, Lasse F Jensen, Jeff A Graves, Joseph I Hoffman, Morten Tange Olsen
Identifying the processes that drive changes in the abundance and distribution of natural populations is a central theme in ecology and evolution. Many species of marine mammals have experienced dramatic changes in abundance and distribution due to climatic fluctuations and anthropogenic impacts. However, thanks to conservation efforts, some of these species have shown remarkable population recovery and are now recolonizing their former ranges. Here, we use zooarchaeological, demographic and genetic data to examine processes of colonization, local extinction and recolonization of the two northern European grey seal subspecies inhabiting the Baltic Sea and North Sea...
September 2016: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27275784/late-pleistocene-early-holocene-migratory-behavior-of-ungulates-using-isotopic-analysis-of-tooth-enamel-and-its-effects-on-forager-mobility
#19
Suzanne E Pilaar Birch, Preston T Miracle, Rhiannon E Stevens, Tamsin C O'Connell
Zooarchaeological and paleoecological investigations have traditionally been unable to reconstruct the ethology of herd animals, which likely had a significant influence on the mobility and subsistence strategies of prehistoric humans. In this paper, we reconstruct the migratory behavior of red deer (Cervus elaphus) and caprids at the Pleistocene-Holocene transition in the northeastern Adriatic region using stable oxygen isotope analysis of tooth enamel. The data show a significant change in δ18O values from the Pleistocene into the Holocene, as well as isotopic variation between taxa, the case study sites, and through time...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27009229/millennial-scale-faunal-record-reveals-differential-resilience-of-european-large-mammals-to-human-impacts-across-the-holocene
#20
Jennifer J Crees, Chris Carbone, Robert S Sommer, Norbert Benecke, Samuel T Turvey
The use of short-term indicators for understanding patterns and processes of biodiversity loss can mask longer-term faunal responses to human pressures. We use an extensive database of approximately 18,700 mammalian zooarchaeological records for the last 11,700 years across Europe to reconstruct spatio-temporal dynamics of Holocene range change for 15 large-bodied mammal species. European mammals experienced protracted, non-congruent range losses, with significant declines starting in some species approximately 3000 years ago and continuing to the present, and with the timing, duration and magnitude of declines varying individually between species...
March 30, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
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