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Caffeine receptor

Diane J Davies, Jon R Heylings, Heather Gayes, Timothy J McCarthy, M Catherine Mack
A new in vitro model based on the electrical resistance properties of the skin barrier has been established in this laboratory. The model utilises a tape stripping procedure in dermatomed pig skin that removes a specific proportion of the stratum corneum, mimicking impaired barrier function observed in humans with damaged skin. The skin penetration and distribution of chemicals with differing physicochemical properties, namely; Benzoic acid, 3-Aminophenol, Caffeine and Sucrose has been assessed in this model...
October 14, 2016: Toxicology in Vitro: An International Journal Published in Association with BIBRA
M M van der Walt, G Terre'Blanche
Recent research exploring C8 substitution on the caffeine core identified 8-(2-phenylethyl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine as a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist. To elaborate further, we included various C8 two-chain-length linkers to enhance adenosine receptor affinity. The results indicated that the unsubstituted benzyloxy linker (1e A1Ki = 1.52 μM) displayed the highest affinity for the A1 adenosine receptor and the para-chloro-substituted phenoxymethyl (1d A2AKi = 1.33 μM) linker the best A2A adenosine receptor affinity...
September 23, 2016: European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
R M Downs, M A Hughes, S T Kinsey, M C Johnson, B L Baumgarner
Caffeine is a widely consumed stimulant that has previously been shown to promote cytotoxic stress and even cell death in numerous mammalian cell lines. Thus far there is little information available regarding the toxicity of caffeine in skeletal muscle cells. Our preliminary data revealed that treating C2C12 myotubes with 5 mM caffeine for 6 h increased nuclear fragmentation and reduced basal and maximal oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in skeletal myotubes. The purpose of this study was to further elucidate the pathways by which caffeine increased cell death and reduced mitochondrial respiration...
October 4, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Seigo Sugimachi, Yukihisa Matsumoto, Makoto Mizunami, Jiro Okada
Caffeine is a plant-derived alkaloid that is generally known as a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. In order to examine the effects of caffeine on higher CNS functions in insects, we used an appetitive olfactory learning paradigm for the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Crickets can form significant long-term memories (LTMs) after repetitive training sessions, during which they associate a conditioned stimulus (CS: odor) with an unconditioned stimulus (US: reward). Administration of hemolymphal injections of caffeine established LTM after only single-trial conditioning over a wide range of caffeine dosages (1...
October 2016: Zoological Science
K De Pauw, B Roelands, J Van Cutsem, U Marusic, T Torbeyns, R Meeusen
OBJECTIVE: A direct link between the mouth cavity and the brain for glucose (GLUC) and caffeine (CAF) has been established. The aim of this study is to determine whether a direct link for both substrates also exist between the nasal cavity and the brain. METHODS: Ten healthy male subjects (age 22 ± 1 years) performed three experimental trials, separated by at least 2 days. Each trial included a 20-s nasal spray (NAS) period in which solutions placebo (PLAC), GLUC, or CAF were provided in a double-blind, randomized order...
September 23, 2016: Psychopharmacology
Adriana Pinto de Freitas, Danielle Dias Pinto Ferreira, Arlete Fernandes, Robertta Silva Martins, Vladimir Pedro Peralva Borges-Martins, Matheus Figueiredo Sathler, Maurício Dos-Santos-Pereira, Roberto Paes-de-Carvalho, Elizabeth Giestal-de-Araujo, Ricardo Augusto de Melo Reis, Regina Celia Cussa Kubrusly
l-Glutamate and l-aspartate are the main excitatory amino acids (EAAs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and their uptake regulation is critical for the maintenance of the excitatory balance. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are widely distributed among central neurons and glial cells. GLAST and GLT1 are expressed in glial cells, whereas excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1) is neuronal. Different signaling pathways regulate glutamate uptake by modifying the activity and expression of EAATs...
September 20, 2016: Neuroscience
Amédée des Georges, Oliver B Clarke, Ran Zalk, Qi Yuan, Kendall J Condon, Robert A Grassucci, Wayne A Hendrickson, Andrew R Marks, Joachim Frank
The type-1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is an intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) release channel required for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we present cryo-EM reconstructions of RyR1 in multiple functional states revealing the structural basis of channel gating and ligand-dependent activation. Binding sites for the channel activators Ca(2+), ATP, and caffeine were identified at interdomain interfaces of the C-terminal domain. Either ATP or Ca(2+) alone induces conformational changes in the cytoplasmic assembly ("priming"), without pore dilation...
September 22, 2016: Cell
Michael D Schwartz, Sarah W Black, Simon P Fisher, Jeremiah B Palmerston, Stephen R Morairty, Marius C Hoener, Thomas S Kilduff
Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) agonists have been shown to have pro-cognitive, antipsychotic-like, anxiolytic, weight-reducing, glucose-lowering and wake-promoting activities. We used Taar1 knockout (KO) and over-expressing (OE) mice and TAAR1 agonists to elucidate the role of TAAR1 in sleep/wake. EEG, EMG, body temperature (Tb) and locomotor activity (LMA) were recorded in Taar1 KO, OE and WT mice. Following a 24 h recording to characterize basal sleep/wake parameters, mice were sleep-deprived (SD) for 6 h...
September 23, 2016: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Thomas M Roston, Wenting Guo, Andrew D Krahn, Ruiwu Wang, Filip Van Petegem, Shubhayan Sanatani, S R Wayne Chen, Anna Lehman
BACKGROUND: Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an ion channelopathy usually caused by gain-of-function mutations ryanodine receptor type-2 (RyR2). Left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC) is an often genetic cardiomyopathy. A rare LVNC-CPVT overlap syndrome may be caused by exon 3 deletion in RyR2. We sought to characterize the phenotypic spectrum and molecular basis of a novel RyR2 mutation identified in a family with both conditions. METHODS: Several members of an affected family underwent clinical and genetic assessments...
September 8, 2016: Journal of Electrocardiology
Alireza Baratloo, Alaleh Rouhipour, Mohammad Mehdi Forouzanfar, Saeed Safari, Marzieh Amiri, Ahmed Negida
CONTEXT: Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive legal drug in the world. Caffeine's role in controlling pain has received less attention in the past, yet is being increasingly considered. This article briefly reviewed the literature to clarify the role of caffeine as a drug for pain control and attract investigators to this topic. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: The data on Caffeine as an adjuvant therapy or as a main component for pain modulation has been narratively reviewed...
June 2016: Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
A Kollmann-Camaiora, E Alsina, A Domínguez, B Del Blanco, M J Yepes, J L Guerrero, A García
Malignant hyperthermia is a hypermetabolic syndrome that appears in susceptible patients after exposure to certain anaesthetic drugs (succinylcholine, inhalation anaesthetics). Its incidence in Spain is 1 in 40,000 adults, with a 10% mortality rate. It is induced by an abnormal regulation of the ryanodine receptors, producing a massive release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the striate muscle. Clinical manifestations include: CO2 increase, tachycardia, haemodynamic instability, metabolic and respiratory acidosis, profuse sweating, hyperpyrexia, CPK increase, myoglobinuria, kidney failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and ending in cardiac arrest...
September 12, 2016: Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación
G Chauhan, K Ray, S Sahu, K Roy, V Jain, M Wadhwa, U Panjwani, K Kishore, S B Singh
Sleep deprivation (SD) upsurges intracellular levels of adenosine, impairs adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) and cognition while caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist improves cognition and adult NCP during SD. We examined the selective antagonistic effects of adenosine A1R using 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT) on impairment of spatial reference memory and adult NCP during 48h SD. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were sleep deprived for 48h, using an automatic cage vibrating stimulus based on animal activity...
September 10, 2016: Neuroscience
Sebastian Hückesfeld, Marc Peters, Michael J Pankratz
Bitter is a taste modality associated with toxic substances evoking aversive behaviour in most animals, and the valence of different taste modalities is conserved between mammals and Drosophila. Despite knowledge gathered in the past on the peripheral perception of taste, little is known about the identity of taste interneurons in the brain. Here we show that hugin neuropeptide-containing neurons in the Drosophila larval brain are necessary for avoidance behaviour to caffeine, and when activated, result in cessation of feeding and mediates a bitter taste signal within the brain...
2016: Nature Communications
Tom M McLellan, John A Caldwell, Harris R Lieberman
Caffeine is consumed by over 80% of U.S. adults. This review examines the effects caffeine has on cognitive and physical function, since most real-world activities require complex decision making, motor processing and movement. Caffeine exerts its effects by blocking adenosine receptors. Following low (∼40mg or ∼0.5mgkg(-1)) to moderate (∼300mg or 4mgkg(-1)) caffeine doses, alertness, vigilance, attention, reaction time and attention improve, but less consistent effects are observed on memory and higher-order executive function, such as judgment and decision making...
September 6, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Aikaterini Thanou, Stavros Stavrakis, John W Dyer, Melissa E Munroe, Judith A James, Joan T Merrill
BACKGROUND: Decreased heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with adverse outcomes in cardiovascular diseases and has been observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We examined the relationship of HRV with SLE disease activity and selected cytokine pathways. METHODS: Fifty-three patients from the Oklahoma Lupus Cohort were evaluated at two visits each. Clinical assessments included the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index, physician global assessment (PGA), and Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment-SLEDAI Flare Index...
2016: Arthritis Research & Therapy
Takashi Murayama, Nagomi Kurebayashi, Haruo Ogawa, Toshiko Yamazawa, Hideto Oyamada, Junji Suzuki, Kazunori Kanemaru, Katsuji Oguchi, Masamitsu Iino, Takashi Sakurai
Type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) is a Ca(2+) release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and is mutated in some muscle diseases, including malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD). Over 200 mutations associated with these diseases have been identified, and most mutations accelerate Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release (CICR), resulting in abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, it remains largely unknown how specific mutations cause different phenotypes. In this study, we investigated the CICR activity of 14 mutations at 10 different positions in the central region of RYR1 (10 MH and four MH/CCD mutations) using a heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells...
November 2016: Human Mutation
Xiaowei Zhong, Bo Sun, Alexander Vallmitjana, Tao Mi, Wenting Guo, Mingke Ni, Ruiwu Wang, Ang Guo, Henry J Duff, Anne M Gillis, Long-Sheng Song, Leif Hove-Madsen, Raul Benitez, S R Wayne Wayne Chen
Beat-to-beat alternations in the amplitude of the cytosolic Ca(2+) transient (Ca(2+) alternans) are thought to be the primary cause of cardiac alternans that can lead to cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. Despite its important role in arrhythmogenesis, the mechanism underlying Ca(2+) alternans remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), the major Ca(2+) release channel responsible for cytosolic Ca(2+) transients, in cardiac alternans. Using a unique mouse model harboring a suppression-of-function (SOF) RyR2 mutation (E4872Q), we assessed the effect of genetically suppressing RyR2 function on Ca(2+) and action potential duration (APD) alternans in intact hearts, and electrocardiogram (ECG) alternans in vivo...
August 31, 2016: Biochemical Journal
Wolfgang Oertel, Jörg B Schulz
Over a period of more than 50 years, the symptomatic treatment of the motor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD) has been optimized using pharmacotherapy, deep brain stimulation, and physiotherapy. The arsenal of pharmacotherapies includes L-Dopa, several dopamine agonists, inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B and catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT), and amantadine. In the later course of the disease, motor complications occur, at which stage different oral formulations of L-Dopa or dopamine agonists with long half-life, a transdermal application or parenteral pumps for continuous drug supply can be subscribed...
October 2016: Journal of Neurochemistry
Barbara Suess, Anne Brockhoff, Wolfgang Meyerhof, Thomas Hofmann
Sensory studies showed the volatile fraction of lemon grass and its main constituent, the odor-active citronellal, to significantly decrease the perceived bitterness of a black tea infusion as well as caffeine solutions. Seven citronellal-related derivatives were synthesized and shown to inhibit the perceived bitterness of caffeine in a structure-dependent manner. The aldehyde function at carbon 1, the (R)-configuration of the methyl-branched carbon 3, and a hydrophobic carbon chain was found to favor the bitter inhibitory activity of citronellal, e...
August 27, 2016: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Mohsin H K Roshan, Amos Tambo, Nikolai P Pace
Parkinson's disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]...
2016: Open Neurology Journal
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