Read by QxMD icon Read

CRC subtypes

Hironori Aoki, Eiichiro Yamamoto, Hiro-O Yamano, Tamotsu Sugai, Tomoaki Kimura, Yoshihito Tanaka, Hiro-O Matsushita, Kenjiro Yoshikawa, Ryo Takagi, Eiji Harada, Michiko Nakaoka, Yuko Yoshida, Taku Harada, Gota Sudo, Makoto Eizuka, Akira Yorozu, Hiroshi Kitajima, Takeshi Niinuma, Masahiro Kai, Masanori Nojima, Hiromu Suzuki, Hiroshi Nakase
BACKGROUND: Colorectal serrated lesions (SLs) are important premalignant lesions whose clinical and biological features are not fully understood. AIMS: We aimed to establish accurate colonoscopic diagnosis and treatment of SLs through evaluation of associations among the morphological, pathological, and molecular characteristics of SLs. METHODS: A total of 388 premalignant and 18 malignant colorectal lesions were studied. Using magnifying colonoscopy, microsurface structures were assessed based on Kudo's pit pattern classification system, and the Type II pit pattern was subcategorized into classical Type II, Type II-Open (Type II-O) and Type II-Long (Type II-L)...
March 15, 2018: Digestive Diseases and Sciences
J Smeby, A Sveen, M A Merok, S A Danielsen, I A Eilertsen, M G Guren, R Dienstmann, A Nesbakken, R A Lothe
BACKGROUND: The prognostic impact of KRAS and BRAFV600E mutations in primary colorectal cancer (CRC) varies with microsatellite instability (MSI) status. The gene expression-based consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) of CRC define molecularly and clinically distinct subgroups, and represent a novel stratification framework in biomarker analysis. We investigated the prognostic value of these mutations within the CMS groups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Totally 1197 primary tumors from a Norwegian series of CRC stage I-IV were analyzed for MSI and mutation status in hotspots in KRAS (codons 12, 13 and 61) and BRAF (codon 600)...
March 5, 2018: Annals of Oncology: Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
Catherine S Grasso, Marios Giannakis, Daniel K Wells, Tsuyoshi Hamada, Xinmeng Jasmine Mu, Michael Quist, Jonathan A Nowak, Reiko Nishihara, Zhi Rong Qian, Kentaro Inamura, Teppei Morikawa, Katsuhiko Nosho, Gabriel Abril-Rodriguez, Charles Connolly, Helena Escuin-Ordinas, Milan S Geybels, William M Grady, Li Hsu, Siwen Hu-Lieskovan, Jeroen R Huyghe, Yeon Joo Kim, Paige E Krystofinski, Mark Dm Leiserson, Dennis J Montoya, Brian B Nadel, Matteo Pellegrini, Colin C Pritchard, Cristina Puig-Saus, Elleanor H Quist, Benjamin J Raphael, Stephen J Salipante, Daniel Sanghoon Shin, Eve Shinbrot, Brian Shirts, Sachet Shukla, Janet L Stanford, Wei Sun, Jennifer Tsoi, Alexander Upfill-Brown, David A Wheeler, Catherine J Wu, Ming Yu, Syed H Zaidi, Jesse M Zaretsky, Stacey B Gabriel, Eric S Lander, Levi A Garraway, Thomas J Hudson, Charles S Fuchs, Antoni Ribas, Shuji Ogino, Ulrike Peters
To understand the genetic drivers of immune recognition and evasion in colorectal cancer (CRC), we analyzed 1,211 CRC primary tumor samples, including 179 classified as microsatellite instability-high (MSI-high). This set includes The Cancer Genome Atlas CRC cohort of 592 samples, completed and analyzed here. MSI-high, a hypermutated, immunogenic subtype of CRC, had a high rate of significantly mutated genes in important immune modulating pathways and in the antigen presentation machinery, including biallelic losses of B2M and HLA genes due to copy number alterations and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH)...
March 6, 2018: Cancer Discovery
Micaela Freitas, Fábio Ferreira, Sónia Carvalho, Fernanda Silva, Paula Lopes, Luís Antunes, Sofia Salta, Francisca Diniz, Lúcio Lara Santos, José Flávio Videira, Rui Henrique, Carmen Jerónimo
BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most incident cancers, associated with significant morbidity and mortality, and usually classified into three main molecular pathways: chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Currently, available screening methods are either costly or of limited specificity, impairing global implementation. More cost-effective strategies, including DNA methylation-based tests, might prove advantageous...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Translational Medicine
Gabriele Romano, Sharmeen Chagani, Lawrence N Kwong
The study and comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer biology strongly rely on mouse modeling. An ideal mouse model should have molecular, histopathological, and etiological characteristics as close as possible to those of the corresponding human tumors. Among solid tumors, colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the malignancies that best suits reproduction in an animal model: it evolves through a progressive set of molecular events and is generally associated with a precise histopathology and a neat cataloging of stages and grades...
February 21, 2018: Oncogene
Hossein Molavi Vardanjani, AliAkbar Haghdoost, Kamran Bagheri-Lankarani, Maryam Hadipour
Background: Population aging and more prevalent westernized lifestyle would be expected to result in a markedly rising burden of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the future years. The aim of this study is to estimate the limited-time prevalence of CRC in Iran between 2015 and 2020. Materials and Methods: Aggregated CRC incidence data were extracted from the Iranian national cancer registry (IR.NCR) reports for 2003-2009 and from GLOBOCAN-2012 database for 2012. Incidence trends were analyzed by age groups, genders, histopathologic, and topographic subtypes to estimate annual percentage changes...
2018: Advanced Biomedical Research
P R Carr, E Alwers, S Bienert, J Weberpals, M Kloor, H Brenner, M Hoffmeister
Introduction: The association of lifestyle factors with molecular pathological subtypes of colorectal cancer (CRC), such as microsatellite instability (MSI), could provide further knowledge about the colorectal carcinogenic process. The aim of this review was to evaluate possible associations between lifestyle factors and risk of sporadic CRC by MSI status. Methods: PubMed and Web of Science were searched for studies investigating the association between alcohol, body mass index (BMI), dietary fiber, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physical activity, red meat, smoking, or statin use, with MSI-high (MSI-H) and microsatellite stable (MSS) CRC...
February 9, 2018: Annals of Oncology: Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology
Bingjun Bai, Lina Shan, Binbin Xie, Xuefeng Huang, Weifang Mao, Xiaowei Wang, Da Wang, Hongbo Zhu
KRAS mutations serve a function in tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer (CRC) and guide the use of targeted drugs. However, the prognostic value of KRAS mutations and their subtypes remain controversial. The present study aimed to investigate the correlations between KRAS mutations and clinicopathological characteristics, and their prognostic significance in Chinese patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC). A total of 135 patients with mCRC were analyzed for KRAS mutations. Mutations in codon 12 and 13 were identified in 45 (33...
March 2018: Oncology Letters
Matthew Alderdice, Susan D Richman, Simon Gollins, Peter Stewart, Chris Hurt, Richard Adams, Amy McCorry, Aideen Roddy, Dale Vimalachandran, Claudio Isella, Enzo Medico, Tim Maughan, Darragh G McArt, Mark Lawler, Philip D Dunne
Colorectal cancer (CRC) biopsies underpin accurate diagnosis, but are also relevant for patient stratification in molecularly-guided clinical trials. The consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) and colorectal cancer intrinsic subtypes (CRIS) transcriptional signatures have potential clinical utility for improving prognostic/predictive patient assignment. However, their ability to provide robust classification, particularly in pre-treatment biopsies from multiple regions or at different time points remains untested...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Pathology
Ting-Ting Yan, Lin-Lin Ren, Chao-Qin Shen, Zhen-Hua Wang, Ya-Nan Yu, Qian Liang, Jia-Yin Tang, Ying-Xuan Chen, Dan-Feng Sun, Witold Zgodziński, Marek Majewski, Piotr Radwan, Ilona Kryczek, Ming Zhong, Jinxian Chen, Qiang Liu, Weiping Zou, Hao-Yan Chen, Jie Hong, Jing-Yuan Fang
Colorectal cancer (CRC) includes an invasive stem-like/mesenchymal subtype but its genetic drivers, functional and clinical relevance are uncharacterized. Here we report the definition of an altered microRNA (miR) signature defining this subtype which includes a major genomic loss of miR-508. Mechanistic investigations showed that this microRNA affected the expression of cadherin CDH1 and the transcription factors ZEB1, SALL4, BMI1 and BMI1. Loss of miR-508 in CRC was associated with upregulation of the novel hypoxia-induced long non-coding RNA AK000053...
January 26, 2018: Cancer Research
Kentaro Inamura
Colorectal cancers (CRCs) are the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Rather than being a single, uniform disease type, accumulating evidence suggests that CRCs comprise a group of molecularly heterogeneous diseases that are characterized by a range of genomic and epigenomic alterations. This heterogeneity slows the development of molecular-targeted therapy as a form of precision medicine. Recent data regarding comprehensive molecular characterizations and molecular pathological examinations of CRCs have increased our understanding of the genomic and epigenomic landscapes of CRCs, which has enabled CRCs to be reclassified into biologically and clinically meaningful subtypes...
January 20, 2018: Cancers
Jennifer M Franks, Guoshuai Cai, Michael L Whitfield
Motivation: Molecular subtypes of cancers and autoimmune disease, defined by transcriptomic profiling, have provided insight into disease pathogenesis, molecular heterogeneity, and therapeutic responses. However, technical biases inherent to different gene expression profiling platforms present a unique problem when analyzing data generated from different studies. Currently, there is a lack of effective methods designed to eliminate platform-based bias. We present a method to normalize and classify RNA-seq data using machine learning classifiers trained on DNA microarray data and molecular subtypes in two datasets: breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) and colorectal cancer (CRC)...
January 17, 2018: Bioinformatics
Pieter-Jan van Dam, Sofie Daelemans, Elizabeth Ross, Yannick Waumans, Steven Van Laere, Emily Latacz, Roanne Van Steen, Christel De Pooter, Mark Kockx, Luc Dirix, Peter B Vermeulen
The encroachment of a growing tumor upon the cells and structures of surrounding normal tissue results in a series of histopathological growth patterns (HGPs). These morphological changes can be assessed in hematoxylin-and-eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections from primary and metastatic tumors and have been characterized in a range of tissue types including liver, lung, lymph node and skin. HGPs in different tissues share certain general characteristics like the extent of angiogenesis, but also appropriate tissue-specific mechanisms which ultimately determine differences in the biology of HGP subtypes...
January 17, 2018: Seminars in Cancer Biology
Petra Jones, Janet E Cade, Charlotte E L Evans, Neil Hancock, Darren C Greenwood
Evidence on adherence to diet-related cancer prevention guidelines and associations with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is limited and conflicting. The aim of this cohort analysis is to evaluate associations between adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) 2007 recommendations and incident CRC. The UK Women's Cohort Study comprises over 35 372 women who filled in a FFQ at baseline in 1995. They were followed up for CRC incidence for a median of 17·4 years, an individual score linking adherence to eight of the WCRF/AICR recommendations was constructed...
February 2018: British Journal of Nutrition
Lay Cheng Lim, Yang Mooi Lim
Tumour heterogeneity is an important feature of colorectal cancer (CRC) manifested by dynamic changes in gene expression, protein expression, and availability of different tumour subtypes. Recent publications in the past ten years have revealed proteome heterogeneity between different colorectal tumours and within the same tumour site. This paper reviews recent research works on the proteome heterogeneity in CRC, which includes the heterogeneity within a single tumour (intratumour heterogeneity), between different anatomical sites at the same organ, and between primary and metastatic sites (intertumour heterogeneity)...
January 5, 2018: Proteomics
Jenny M Riley, Ashley W Cross, Chrystal M Paulos, Mark P Rubinstein, John Wrangle, E Ramsay Camp
Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common malignancy and the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Large multi-omic databases, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas and the International Colorectal Cancer Subtyping Consortium, have identified distinct molecular subtypes related to anatomy. The identification of genomic alterations in CRC is now critical because of the recent success and US Food and Drug Administration approval of pembrolizumab and nivolumab for microsatellite-instable tumors...
January 9, 2018: Cancer
Elizabeth Alwers, Min Jia, Matthias Kloor, Hendrik Bläker, Hermann Brenner, Michael Hoffmeister
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease with different mechanisms of pathogenesis. Classification systems have been proposed based on molecular features of tumors, but none are used in clinical practice. We performed a systematic review of studies on the associations between molecular classifications of CRC and patient survival. METHODS: We searched the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases for combinations of terms related to CRC, molecular markers, subtype classifications, and survival (overall survival, disease-specific survival, disease-free survival)...
January 3, 2018: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Janneke F Linnekamp, Sander R van Hooff, Pramudita R Prasetyanti, Raju Kandimalla, Joyce Y Buikhuisen, Evelyn Fessler, Prashanthi Ramesh, Kelly A S T Lee, Grehor G W Bochove, Johan H de Jong, Kate Cameron, Ronald van Leersum, Hans M Rodermond, Marek Franitza, Peter Nürnberg, Laura R Mangiapane, Xin Wang, Hans Clevers, Louis Vermeulen, Giorgio Stassi, Jan Paul Medema
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a highly heterogeneous disease both from a molecular and clinical perspective. Several distinct molecular entities, such as microsatellite instability (MSI), have been defined that make up biologically distinct subgroups with their own clinical course. Recent data indicated that CRC can be best segregated into four groups called consensus molecular subtypes (CMS1-4), each of which has a unique biology and gene expression pattern. In order to develop improved, subtype-specific therapies and to gain insight into the molecular wiring and origin of these subtypes, reliable models are needed...
January 5, 2018: Cell Death and Differentiation
Pawel Karpinski, Joanna Rossowska, Maria Malgorzata Sasiadek
Recent, large-scale expression-based subtyping has advanced our understanding of the genomic landscape of colorectal cancer (CRC) and resulted in a consensus molecular classification that enables the categorization of most CRC tumors into one of four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS). Currently, major progress in characterization of immune landscape of tumor-associated microenvironment has been made especially with respect to microsatellite status of CRCs. While these studies profoundly improved the understanding of molecular and immunological profile of CRCs heterogeneity less is known about repertoire of the tumor infiltrating immune cells of each CMS...
December 1, 2017: Oncotarget
Helei Hou, Dong Liu, Chuantao Zhang, Yanxia Jiang, Guifang Lu, Na Zhou, Xiaonan Yang, Xiaoping Zhang, Zhuokun Li, Hongmei Zhu, Zhaoyang Qian, Xiaochun Zhang
Objective: Colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with both RAS and BRAF wild-type tumors determined by non-next generation sequencing (NGS) testing may still not respond due to the presence of additional mutated genes such as PIK3CA or PTEN . In this study, a broad, hybrid capture-based NGS assay was used to identify RAS, BRAF and additional targetable genetic alterations from Chinese CRC tissues. Methods: Fifty-seven cases of CRC were enrolled, and all the patients signed the informed consent...
December 1, 2017: Oncotarget
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"