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Forensic odontology

Byung-Yoon Roh, Won-Joon Lee, Jeong-Uk Seo, U-Young Lee, Sang-Seob Lee
The National Forensic Service (NFS) of Korea is a government agency responsible for examining and evaluating evidence obtained at crime scenes. The Section of Forensic Odontology of the Medical Examiner's Office conducts forensic odontological analyses of human remains, and mainly criminal cases are handled. In this study, 588 forensic odontological cases referred to NFS during 2011-2015 were analyzed for referral pattern, evidence material, examination criteria, and other factors and were compared with respective data from 2007 to 2010...
March 2, 2018: Legal Medicine
Nilufer Gev Pajnigara, Apeksha S Balpande, Mukta B Motwani, Anuraag Choudhary, Samantha Thakur, Natasha G Pajnigara
Aim: The present study attempts to compare the bite mark overlays generated by three different methods. The objectives of the study were to compare the three commonly used techniques for overlay generation and to evaluate the interobserver reliability in assessing bite marks by these methods. Materials and Methods: Overlays were produced from the biting surfaces of six upper and six lower anterior teeth of 30 dental study models using the following three methods: (a) Hand tracing from wax impressions, (b) radiopaque impression method and (c) computer-based method...
September 2017: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology: JOMFP
J G Dietrichkeit Pereira, T S Frontanilla Recalde, P Barreto Costa, V Jacometti, L Vigorito Magalhães, R H Alves Da Silva
BACKGROUND: Forensic Odontology is a topic present in the majority of Dental Schools in Brazil, and due to this reality, some universities develop activities related to undergraduate and graduate students, from the Dentistry course until the Ph.D. degree. AIM: To present the education experience related to Forensic Odontology at School of Dentistry of Ribeirão Preto (USP - University of São Paulo), showing the strategies and activities in the different degrees (Dental course, Forensic Odontology Specialization Program, Specific Professional Training, Master, and Ph...
December 1, 2017: Journal of Forensic Odonto-stomatology
C Capitaneanu, G Willems, P Thevissen
BACKGROUND: In human identification sex estimation plays an important role in the search for ante-mortem data. AIM: To systematically review studies describing and testing/validating methods of odontological sex estimation. The set research question was: What odontological sex estimation method is the most accurate? MATERIALS AND METHODS: An electronic search until November 29th 2016 was performed in 5 databases: MEDLINE/PubMed, Cochrane, SciELO, LILACS and Grey literature...
December 1, 2017: Journal of Forensic Odonto-stomatology
M Saadeh, J G Ghafari, R V Haddad, F Ayoub
BACKGROUND: The use of the palatal rugae in forensic odontology is based on their unique and individual characteristics. Few studies have assessed the palatal rugae in Mediterranean populations and none in the Lebanese population. OBJECTIVE: Assess the shape and other morphological features of the palatal rugae in a Lebanese adult population, and compare them with reported similar features in other populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rugae characteristics were assessed on the maxillary dental casts of 217 non-growing subjects (95 males, 122 females, age 25...
July 1, 2017: Journal of Forensic Odonto-stomatology
Shaik Kamal Sha, B Vengal Rao, M Sirisha Rao, K V Halini Kumari, Sudarshan Kumar Chinna, Divya Sahu
Personal identification methods may not be efficient when bodies are decomposed, burned, in cases of mass disasters when soft tissue cannot provide reliable information or has been lost. Various methods currently employed in forensic odontology for personal identification include comparing with antemortem dental charts, rugoscopy, denture labeling, DNA analysis from dental pulp, bite mark analysis, etc., Recently, there is growing interest in the study of enamel rod end patterns. These enamel rod end patterns are termed as "Tooth prints" and the study of these prints is known as "Ameloglyphics" (amelo: Enamel, Glyphics: Carvings)...
November 2017: Journal of Pharmacy & Bioallied Sciences
Joe Adserias-Garriga, Christian Thomas, Douglas H Ubelaker, Sara C Zapico
When human remains are found, the priority of the investigation is to ascertain the identity of the deceased. A positive identification is a key factor in providing closure for the family of the deceased; it is also required to issue the death certificate and therefore, to settle legal affairs. Moreover, it is difficult for any forensic investigation involving human remains to be solved without the determination of an identity. Therefore, personal identification is necessary for social, legal and forensic reasons...
December 9, 2017: Archives of Oral Biology
Carl N Stephan
The tallied facial soft tissue thicknesses (or T-Tables) represent grand means of published facial soft tissue thickness sample means. These sample means have been drawn from across the full-breadth of the facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) literature, including forensic science, anthropology and odontology. The report of new summary statistics for >1290 new sub-adults and >2200 new adults since the last T-Table calculation, in 2008 for sub-adults and 2013 for adults respectively, makes their update timely...
September 29, 2017: Forensic Science International
Michael J Saks, Thomas Albright, Thomas L Bohan, Barbara E Bierer, C Michael Bowers, Mary A Bush, Peter J Bush, Arturo Casadevall, Simon A Cole, M Bonner Denton, Shari Seidman Diamond, Rachel Dioso-Villa, Jules Epstein, David Faigman, Lisa Faigman, Stephen E Fienberg, Brandon L Garrett, Paul C Giannelli, Henry T Greely, Edward Imwinkelried, Allan Jamieson, Karen Kafadar, Jerome P Kassirer, Jonathan 'Jay' Koehler, David Korn, Jennifer Mnookin, Alan B Morrison, Erin Murphy, Nizam Peerwani, Joseph L Peterson, D Michael Risinger, George F Sensabaugh, Clifford Spiegelman, Hal Stern, William C Thompson, James L Wayman, Sandy Zabell, Ross E Zumwalt
Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field...
December 2016: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
Roberto Cesar Biancalana, Sergio Augusto Freitas Vincenti, Ricardo Henrique Alves da Silva, Fernanda Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza
In the post-mortem examination of the dental arches of accident victims in cold locations, dental restorative materials can be found. Cold temperatures can be capable of causing color changes of aesthetic materials, such as composite resin (CR) and glass ionomer cement (GIC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the cold action on the color stability of CR and GIC restorations, in order to discriminate them and enable the adequate comparison between antemortem and post-mortem data. Sixty bovine teeth (30 CR and 30 GIC) were prepared (6 × 6 × 2 mm) and separated into groups (n = 10)...
October 2017: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
John Berketa, Denice Higgins
Fatalities due to fire events such as bushfires, domestic and industrial fires and vehicle accident related incineration, leave victims with limited prospects of being accurately identified. Due to their morphology and anatomical position teeth are uniquely protected in incineration cases and via comparison to dental records often provide the only scientifically valid means of identification. However, extreme heat and direct exposure to flame can render the teeth extremely fragile and vulnerable to damage and loss especially during collection and transportation to the mortuary...
October 2017: Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
Lauren Stow, Denice Higgins
BACKGROUND: Human identification can be reliably established by dental comparison; success is significantly impacted by inadequate antemortem information. Previous Australian research revealed suboptimal recording of features important for forensic dental identification and compliance with Dental Board of Australia guidelines. We hence created and evaluated an online education programme aimed at improving oral health practitioner recording. METHODS: An Interactive Learning Module (ILM) was constructed and released to three focus groups representing practitioners with varying experience levels - Australian Society of Forensic Odontology members, third year dental students and the wider dental community...
July 7, 2017: Australian Dental Journal
Emiliya Taneva, Carla Evans, Grace Viana
The study of identical twins can point out potential limitations in biometrics and forensic odontology. This case report presents three-dimensional (3D) palatal rugae analysis in monozygotic twins utilizing digital models obtained directly by scanning the maxillary dental arch with the iTero® intraoral digital scanner. The results show that the rugae patterns contain related but not identical features between the pair of identical twins. Dental study models taken on a regular basis for diagnosis and treatment planning in dentistry include the palatal rugae, which could be valuable to forensics in identical twin identification cases...
2017: Case Reports in Dentistry
Antoine Saadé, Pascal Baron, Ziad Noujeim, Dany Azar
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Assessing dental and bone ages is frequently required in a wide range of fields such as odontology, forensic science, as well as orthopedics. The aim of this study was to evaluate applicability of two methods of bone age assessment and two methods of dental age (DA) assessment for Lebanese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Skeletal age (SA) of 260 orthodontic patients (124 males, 136 females divided into four groups each) was consecutively assessed using Greulich and Pyle and Fishman's SMI methods...
May 2017: Journal of International Society of Preventive & Community Dentistry
Gargi S Sarode, Sachin C Sarode, Shakira Choudhary, Shankargouda Patil, Rahul Anand, Himadri Vyas
CONTEXT: Forensic odontology plays a pivotal role in the identification of victims in mass disasters with the help of "Preserved dental records" available with the general dental practitioners (GDPs). However, the status of such dental records of forensic importance has not been studied extensively. AIM: To study the current status of awareness and practice of dental record maintenance by GDPs of Pune. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 100 randomly selected GDPs from Pune...
January 2017: Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
Sanda Usha Rani, Guttikonda Venkateswara Rao, Dumpala Rakesh Kumar, Taneeru Sravya, Yeluri Sivaranjani, Manchikatla Praveen Kumar
BACKGROUND: Age and sex determinations are important tools in forensic odontology which help in the identification of an individual. Radiographic method of sex and age estimation is a noninvasive simple technique. Measurements of the maxillary sinuses can be used for the estimation of age and gender when other methods are inconclusive. Maxillary sinus dimensions were used as an important tool in the identification of unknown. AIM: This study aims to estimate age and sex using the dimensions and volume of the maxillary sinus in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)...
January 2017: Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
Atul Bhardwaj, M S Priya, S Karthiga Kannan, Smita Singh, Saquib B Ahmed Shaikh, Mousa Abu Fadaleh
CONTEXT: Forensic odontology is one of the branches of dentistry, which played a very important role in identification of individuals in accident, natural and mass disaster, and civil unrest and in genocide crimes. In the absence of natural teeth, marking or labeling of denture plays a vital role in the personal identification. BACKGROUND: Various types of marking or labeling methods are reported. However, many are not according to the criteria put forth by American Dental Association or other professional association...
January 2017: Journal of Forensic Dental Sciences
Radhika Kalyani Kommalapati, Deepthi Katuri, Kiran Kumar Kattappagari, Lalith Prakash Chandra Kantheti, Rajasekhar Babu Murakonda, Chandra Sekhar Poosarla, Ravi Teja Chitturi, Sridhar Reddy Gontu, Venkata Ramana Reddy Baddam
BACKGROUND: Forensic odontology plays important role in identification of human remains in mass disasters such as air crash, tsunami, and accidents. Palatal rugae act as an ideal requisite for human identification as they are present in all victims and are resistant to changes such as aging and trauma. The study aimed to analyze differences in shape and number of palatal rugae in population from Andhra Pradesh and Telangana states. METHODS: This study was conducted in SIBAR institute of Dental Sciences, Guntur, India in 2012 on 200 subjects, gender matched and equally divided as 100 from Andhra Pradesh and 100 from Telangana states...
May 2017: Iranian Journal of Public Health
K P Divakar
Forensic Odontology a branch of Forensic sciences uses the skill of the dentist in personal identification during mass calamities, sexual assault and child abuse to name a few. This branch not stranger to many has been growing tenfold in its potential and its ability to bring the forlorn to justice where a dental remains is the only available evidence. It's role and importance in the judiciary is fast growing and hence in depth knowledge in this field seems more than justified.
March 2017: International Journal of Biomedical Science: IJBS
Smitha Reddy, Bhuvan Shome, Jayaprakash Patil, Pradeep Koppolu
INTRODUCTION: Exploration and determination of the relationship between stature and length of tooth is essential in Paleontology, Forensic Odontology and Endodontology. This study aimed to determine any association between stature and posterior tooth length in a group of patients who required root canal treatment. METHODS: Age, sex and standing height of adults were considered for posterior tooth length measurement. Molars and Premolars of apparently normal males (n=115 for molars, n= 75 for premolars) and females (n=124 for molars, n=80 for premolars), aged 20-50 years with intact cuspal morphology, which required RCT were selected for this study...
2017: Pan African Medical Journal
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